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NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Gawker Media is asking a California federal judge to throw out a lawsuit filed by Quentin Tarantino over his leaked screenplay for "The Hateful Eight," arguing it only facilitated the reading of the unproduced screenplay and didn't enable any copyright infringement. Tarantino sued Gawker for contributory copyright infringement in January, after its Defamer blog published a post titled "Here Is the Leaked Quentin Tarantino 'Hateful Eight' Script" with download links to third-party websites hosting copies of the document.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
A federal judge has ruled that Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick, Dr. John H. Watson, are no longer protected by copyright, and that all elements of the famous sleuth's stories created by the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle before 1923 are now in the public domain. The court case required U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo to become something of a Sherlock Holmes expert, and in a 22-page ruling issued last week in Chicago, he began by summarizing the four novels and 56 short stories Conan Doyle wrote about the fictional detective: The character first appeared in 1887.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Two of the nation's preeminent legal experts on copyright law are siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, a start-up service that transmits local television signals via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court, UCLA School of Law professor David Nimmer and Peter Menell, a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, warned that if Aereo were found to be legal it could "decimate multiple industries. " The broadcasters are hoping that the high court will overturn last year's 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruling that found Aereo's transmissions and recordings are not "public performances" of copyrighted material.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Unlike last year, people hoping to jazz up their Academy Awards viewing parties this weekend with an oversized statuette resembling Oscar are now out of luck. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has settled a lawsuit it brought against an Edwardsville, Ill.-based events rental company for copyright infringement stemming from the alleged renting and selling of eight-foot statues that looked like the Oscar statuettes. The case against TheEventLine.com and its president, Robert Hollingsworth, was settled late last year and dismissed Nov. 19. In a lawsuit filed March 9 in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, the Academy had alleged that Hollingsworth continued to market, sell and rent the eight-foot statues after he'd been notified of the alleged infringement in a letter sent in March 2011.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Nullsoft Inc., maker of the MP3 music player Winamp, has agreed to stop distributing copies of a music-decoding program. The Sedona, Ariz., company is the defendant in a $20-million copyright infringement suit filed by PlayMedia Systems Inc. of Los Angeles. PlayMedia claims that Nullsoft founder Justin Frankel did not pay to use software code PlayMedia developed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996
Bruce Stokes of the Council on Foreign Relations made some surprising errors in his commentary about how China ignores U.S. copyright (Opinion, May 26). For example, he states that some movies are available on videocassette in China before they appear on the screen. How? To accomplish this would take a huge conspiracy involving post-production supervisors, processing labs and literally hundreds of technicians. Not likely! What I believe he meant to say was that movies on video often appear in China before the U.S. Regarding the short shrift he gave writers, composers, producers and directors, I can assure you nobody stands for copyrighted property being pirated.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
CBS has dropped its copyright infringement lawsuit againstABC's reality series "The Glass House," which the network had contended was a close copy of its"Big Brother" reality show. Executives maintained the low rating of "Glass House" made the suit unnecessary. "The viewers have spoken and delivered the ultimate form of justice against 'The Glass House,' " said the statement from CBS. "As a result, we filed in federal court this morning a voluntary dismissal without prejudice of our claims against ABC. " However, CBS left open the door for further legal action: "We reserve the right to re-file this claim against ABC/"The Glass House" or any other entity, that goes to such shocking lengths to duplicate our copyright material.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Wonderware Corp. in Irvine announced Wednesday that it has reached an out-of-court settlement ending more than two years of legal disputes over copyright issues with a pair of rival software developers. Terms of the settlements between Wonderware, Cyberlogic Technologies Inc. and Intellution Inc. were not disclosed. None of the companies admitted any wrongdoing or liability.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1988 | From Reuters
Under pressure from the United States, Thailand amended its copyright law Thursday to tighten control on production of fake designer clothes, books, music tapes and other goods. After days of fierce politicking by opposition politicians, parliament approved by a 183-134 vote an amendment to the 1978 Copyright Act effectively extending its protection to the United States. U.S. Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter had set a Dec.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated. While Hollywood executives and film stars chatter about who's going to win Oscars, the buzz in geekier circles is focused on a low-budget film that, despite being at the other end of the quality scale from "Gravity" and "12 Years a Slave," could set a worrisome legal precedent. The 13-minute trailer for "Innocence of Muslims," a crude piece of anti-Islamic agit-prop, is best known for triggering outraged protests across the Middle East and northern Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By August Brown
Back in 2010, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig gave a lecture on copyright law. Speaking at a conference for the organization Creative Commons, he used YouTube clips of fans dancing to Phoenix's song " Lisztomania" as an example of proper "fair use" principles. He later uploaded the full lecture, which included the clips, to YouTube.   Liberation Music, the firm that licenses the Phoenix song in Australia and New Zealand, disagreed with Lessig's take. The firm issued a YouTube takedown order , asking that the lecture video be removed, and later threatened their own lawsuit against Lessig.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - In a ruling that a dissenting judge called "unprecedented," a federal appeals court ordered Google Inc. on Wednesday to take down an anti-Muslim video that an actress said forced her to leave her home because of death threats. Google said it would appeal the ruling, but removed the video, "Innocence of Muslims," from YouTube and other platforms. The video has incited violent Muslim protests and has been banned by several Muslim countries. The 2 to 1 decision by the 9 t h U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the actress who appeared in the film never consented to being in it and her performance may be protected by copyright law. "While answering a casting call for a low-budget amateur film doesn't often lead to stardom, it also rarely turns an aspiring actress into the subject of a fatwa ," Chief Judge Alex Kozinski wrote for the majority.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Gawker's stock in trade is revealing things about celebrities and other public figures that they'd much rather keep private. And as long as what it prints is true, it's pretty much immune from libel lawsuits. Not so for copyright infringement, though. And though Gawker isn't the most sympathetic outlet, a new lawsuit against the site for linking to an infringing copy of an unreleased screenplay should send chills down the spines of every reporter who writes about copyright issues.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The big television networks have faced all number of challenges in recent years. But they could be done in by something called Aereo. Most people probably haven't heard of Aereo, which has been rolling out its video service for just over a year and still serves only 10 cities, none further west than Salt Lake. But millions will be hearing about it now, because on Jan. 10, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the broadcasters' complaints that Aereo's business dramatically breaches telecommunications and copyright law. The New York start-up offers its subscribers signals from their local over-the-air broadcasters in a way that is either a minor tweak of how they can get those signals on their own (that's Aereo's version)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By David G. Savage and Maura Dolan
WASHINGTON - The California-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is known for progressive rulings that champion individual rights over government and corporations, but when it comes to show business, the "Hollywood Circuit" - as it has been dubbed - stands accused of routinely siding with the home-turf entertainment industry. Judges famously sided with film studios in the early 1980s when the studios sued Sony for infringing their copyrights by selling the Betamax video recorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | Suzanne Muchnic
Most art piracy cases never reach the courts because infringement is difficult to prove or artists can't afford expensive lawsuits. Admirers of the late Lorser Feitelson's paintings, for example, have noted a similarity between his "lineform" abstractions and the twisted ribbon-like design on Coca-Cola cans, but the likeness has never been legally challenged. Neither has the similarity between one of Matt Mullican's images and the logo on Max Studio clothing.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2008 | Times Wire Services
Google Inc. won preliminary approval of a settlement of copyright lawsuits by publishers and authors in which it will pay $125 million to resolve claims over the company's book-scanning project. U.S. District Judge John Sprizzo in New York issued the order tentatively approving the deal and scheduled a hearing for June 11, when he will further consider the pact's fairness. Mountain View, Calif.-based Google has said the settlement, announced Oct. 28, will enable it to make millions of books searchable and printable online.
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Friday night at 9, millions of Americans will sit in front of their televisions and watch the tropical police drama "Hawaii Five-0" on their local CBS station. And over the next week, roughly 3 million more will watch the show on their own schedule. That's an unremarkable statistic today, considering that half of American homes have a digital video recorder. But until Jan. 17, 1984, it was an open question whether consumer electronics companies would even be allowed to sell such devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Joe Flint and Ryan Faughnder
The U.S. Supreme Court could settle the fate of a new technology company that television broadcasters fear would destroy their business. On Friday, the high court said it would hear arguments that Aereo Inc., a start-up firm, violates copyright law by enabling its customers to stream local television stations over the Internet and that it should be shut down. The major media companies seeking the court's review include CBS Corp., 21st Century Fox, Walt Disney Co. and Comcast Corp.  FACES TO WATCH 2014: Digital media Launched in 2012 and backed by media mogul Barry Diller, Aereo is currently available in 10 cities, including New York, where it is based.
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