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BUSINESS
August 2, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Warning: Copyright threats on DVDs and TV broadcasts may be misstating the law. A high-tech trade group made that charge Wednesday to the Federal Trade Commission, alleging deceptive trade practices for the scary copyright warnings before movies and during sports broadcasts. The Computer and Communications Industry Assn. said it was trying to protect the public's legal rights from overzealous media companies, which in turn said they were simply trying to protect their content.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2008 | Times Wire Services
Google Inc. won preliminary approval of a settlement of copyright lawsuits by publishers and authors in which it will pay $125 million to resolve claims over the company's book-scanning project. U.S. District Judge John Sprizzo in New York issued the order tentatively approving the deal and scheduled a hearing for June 11, when he will further consider the pact's fairness. Mountain View, Calif.-based Google has said the settlement, announced Oct. 28, will enable it to make millions of books searchable and printable online.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995
Who would have thought copyright law could be so interesting? Just ask Esti Miller of Culver City. She has plenty to say on the subject. Miller's essay on the North American Free Trade Agreement recently won the prestigious American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers' Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition. Miller compared NAFTA with the 1957 Treaty of Rome, which established the European economic community, and the subsequent 1992 Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2006 | From Reuters
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit alleging that Google Inc.'s Web search systems infringe a publisher's copyright, a minor victory for the company, which faces numerous suits charging that its services trample the rights of authors. In a ruling issued March 10 and made known Thursday, Judge R. Barclay Surrick of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania rejected 11 allegations contained in a civil complaint by Gordon Roy Parker of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan signed legislation Monday to expand copyright protection of U.S.-produced literary and artistic works, calling the event "a watershed for us." Reagan signed the 1988 Berne Convention Implementation Act at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in a ceremony attended by congressmen and members of the artistic community who had worked to get the legislation passed.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2008 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
He is the world's most famous personality, better known in this country than anyone living or dead, real or fictional. Market researchers say his 97% recognition rate in the U.S. edges out even Santa Claus. He is the one -- and, for now, only -- Mickey Mouse. As Mickey turns 80 this fall, the most beloved rodent in show business is widely regarded as a national treasure. But he is owned lock, stock and trademark ears by the corporate heirs of his genius creator, Walt Disney.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated. While Hollywood executives and film stars chatter about who's going to win Oscars, the buzz in geekier circles is focused on a low-budget film that, despite being at the other end of the quality scale from "Gravity" and "12 Years a Slave," could set a worrisome legal precedent. The 13-minute trailer for "Innocence of Muslims," a crude piece of anti-Islamic agit-prop, is best known for triggering outraged protests across the Middle East and northern Africa.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2007 | From Reuters
A U.S. appeals court has rejected a bid by Internet activists to roll back federal laws that extended copyright protection over "orphan works," or books and other media that are no longer in print. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court decision to dismiss Kahle vs. Gonzales, which argued that legal changes made in the 1990s had vastly extended copyright protections at the expense of free speech rights.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2005 | From Reuters
Software makers asked Congress to make it easier to track down people who copy their products over the Internet, joining the entertainment industry in an effort to stiffen copyright protections. The Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group whose members include Microsoft Corp. and Apple Computer Inc., said Internet service providers like America Online should be required to reveal the names of customers who may be distributing copyright software through "peer to peer" networks such as Kazaa.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1997 | Bloomberg News
President Clinton on Tuesday signed legislation that would allow for punishment of people who post copyrighted works on the Internet, even if they don't make money off the site. The measure extends copyright law to permit prosecution of individuals who "with criminal intent" seek to infringe others' copyrights, whether or not they make money off the posting, said bill sponsor Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.). The bill doesn't alter the "fair use" doctrine of copyright law, Goodlatte said.
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