Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCopyright
IN THE NEWS

Copyright

BUSINESS
March 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Three men whom prosecutors dubbed the "Robin Hoods of cyberspace" pleaded guilty to putting copyrighted computer software on the Internet so that people around the world could make copies for free. All three said they made no money on the scheme and did it just for the sport of it. Seth Kleinberg, 26, of Los Angeles, Jeffrey Lerman, 20, of New York and Albert Bryndza, 32, of New York pleaded guilty to federal copyright charges.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Yamaha Motor Corp. is suing two distributors of motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles and a dealership, accusing them of violating its copyright and trademark rights by selling Chinese-made knockoffs of Yamaha-brand vehicles. The complaint was filed this week in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles against Yamoto Motor Corp., Patriot Motorcycles Corp. and Family Motor Sports Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | From Associated Press
"The Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown was accused in Britain's High Court on Monday of taking material for his blockbuster conspiracy thriller from a 1982 book about the Holy Grail. The accusation was made in a breach of copyright lawsuit filed against "The Da Vinci Code" publisher Random House. If the lawsuit succeeds in getting an injunction barring use of the disputed material, the scheduled May 19 release of "The Da Vinci Code" film starring Tom Hanks and Ian McKellan could be threatened.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood studios and software developers squared off against Internet traditionalists Wednesday as a congressional panel began debate on a bill aimed at updating copyright laws to protect music recordings, software, movies and other creative works from piracy on the Internet.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bikram Choudhury, the Indian yoga guru who became a multimillionaire by popularizing "hot yoga" in America, has settled with a coalition of yoga studios that challenged the copyright to his version of the discipline -- an art form that is thousands of years old.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
An organization of more than 8,000 authors accused Google Inc. of "massive copyright infringement," saying the powerful Internet search engine could not put its books in the public domain for commercial use without permission. The lawsuit, filed by Author's Guild Inc. in U.S. District Court in New York, asked the court to block Google from copying the books. Google, based in Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
The House on Tuesday approved legislation designed to protect books, music, software and other creative works from Internet pirates who illegally copy and distribute the products. Entertainment companies such as Time Warner Inc., software developers such as Microsoft Corp. and book publishers would benefit from the legislation as the popularity of electronic commerce takes off and online pirates proliferate.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
America Online, the world's largest Internet service provider, may be liable for a posting of copyrighted stories by science fiction author Harlan Ellison because of an e-mail oversight, a U.S. appeals court said. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated part of the writer's case against AOL, ruling that the Time Warner Inc.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a last-ditch effort to stave off extinction, the controversial song-swapping service Napster Inc. promised a federal judge Friday that it will block access to at least 1 million copyrighted song files--a move that could mark the beginning of the end of Napster's life as a freewheeling vehicle for pirated music. Napster attorney David Boies told U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2003 | From Reuters
Hollywood's major film and TV studios sued cable TV operator Adelphia Communications Corp., accusing it of failing to pay for airing TV shows like Major League Baseball coverage and movies such as "Bull Durham." The lawsuit, filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, compounds troubles at Adelphia, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in June 2002 after defaulting on some $7 billion in bank loans. The Motion Picture Assn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|