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BUSINESS
August 1, 2003 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
Someone is gunning for Marion "Suge" Knight. The head of Death Row Records grew famous glamorizing gang violence. He called his artists "inmates." His company logo depicted a hooded convict strapped into an electric chair. His producers grafted violent lyrics onto driving rhythms, punctuated by shotgun blasts and wailing sirens. That was make-believe mayhem. Now, Knight is being stalked by the real thing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2009 | Matt Schudel, Schudel writes for the Washington Post.
Barbara A. Ringer had just graduated from Columbia University's law school in 1949 when she joined the Copyright Office at the Library of Congress. Within a few years, she set about revising an archaic set of laws that had been in place since 1909 -- before the invention of television or commercial radio, before copying machines and the modern recording industry, let alone cable TV, home computers and the Internet.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This week the entertainment industry finally is getting a version of something it has been craving since the original Napster transformed online piracy into a mass-market phenomenon: a new Copyright Alert System that turns Internet service providers into anti-piracy enforcers. It's not as powerful as the major record companies and Hollywood studios have proposed, and it ignores many sources of bootlegged music and movie files online. But it's a start. And if the industry's assumptions are correct, it could make a dent in the problem.
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