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NEWS
December 4, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's story is brought to you by the letter "C." C for the Change taking place at Sesame Workshop, the parent of "Sesame Street." And for the Competition in children's television that is fueling that change. More than three decades ago, Sesame Workshop, then known as Children's Television Workshop, revolutionized TV for preschoolers with its curriculum-based, commercial-free PBS show that used Jim Henson's lovable Muppets to make learning numbers and letters fun.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 1999 | From Reuters
A DVD industry group said Tuesday it has filed suit against dozens of Web site operators for allegedly posting a DVD copying program that the group says is illegal and could destroy the fast-growing new format. At the heart of the complaint is a program written by a Norwegian programmer that foils the encryption that prevents DVDs, or digital videodiscs, from being copied.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2000 | RITA CIOLLI, NEWSDAY
In a big win for the entertainment industry, a federal judge ruled Thursday that it was illegal for a Web site publisher to either post, or link to, the software code that breaks the electronic locks on DVDs. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan said this closely watched test case about copyright law and digital media should send a message that using the Internet to copy music and films is "stealing."
BUSINESS
October 31, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Rank Group's Hard Rock Cafe International unit is suing Pacific Sunwear of California Inc., a retailer of teenage clothing, for selling merchandise under the "Hard Rap Cafe" label. Rank's Hard Rock has invested more than $50 million in promotions featuring its trademarked logos on merchandise that includes hats, sweatshirts and key chains, the company claims. Hard Rock Cafe T-shirts "have achieved a unique cult-like aura and popularity," Hard Rock contends in its lawsuit, filed last week in U.S.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2001 | Jon Healey
Napster Inc. enlisted the help of Berkeley-based Gracenote in blocking copyrighted songs from its online music-sharing service, as required by a federal court injunction. A single song might be traded on the Napster service under a wide variety of names, yet the pretrial injunction requires Napster to block all such variants when notified by the labels or music publishers.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Cadence Design Systems Inc. said a federal judge ordered Avant Corp. to stop selling and using its ArcCell software, an expected move in Cadence's copyright infringement suit against Avant. The order from U.S. District Judge Ronald Whyte in San Jose clarifies and reinforces his preliminary injunction of Dec. 19.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1987 | From Associated Press
A Texas firm that owns exclusive U.S. rights to the Corona trademark for marketing everything but the beer itself said it has obtained a court order to halt other companies from using the trendy blue and yellow logo. Los Angeles attorney Joseph A. Yanny said in a prepared statement that he has filed a lawsuit in federal court in Los Angeles on behalf of Procermex Inc., of San Antonio to keep other companies from selling clothes bearing the popular Mexican beer's logo. Earlier this month, U.S.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2000 | Elizabeth Douglass
Telecommunications giant AT&T Corp. agreed to pay a "significant" settlement to a Los Angeles inventor who sued the phone company for using his patented technology in a variety of computerized telephone and call-processing systems. The inventor, Ronald A. Katz, said he is "overjoyed" by the settlement but that he is bound by a confidentiality pact to not disclose the amount and terms of the AT&T agreement.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2000 | Reuters
Motorola Inc. said it filed lawsuits in federal courts in several states, including California, to stop the sale of its radio-service software on the online auction Web site EBay. The radio software is a computer program used with IBM-compatible computers to program Motorola's two-way radios. Motorola licenses the software to its partners and customers on a restricted basis.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | Dave Wilson, Dave Wilson is The Times' personal technology columnist
Part of the Napster story is indeed about keeping digitized material--in this case, music--from being stolen. But it's also about a well-funded campaign by big business to maximize profits by curtailing consumer rights. Corporations want to earn as much as they can from their intellectual property by turning all our entertainment--print, music, video--into pay-per-view.
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