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Corcoran Gallery Of Art

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NEWS
February 5, 2001 | The Washington Post
Two top executives of America Online and their wives have jointly pledged $30 million to the Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art and Design, the largest single donation in the museum's 132-year history. The gift is earmarked for a $120-million addition to the facility. The donors are Robert and Veronique Pittman and Barry and Tracy Schuler of Great Falls, Va. Robert Pittman, 47, is to be co-chief operating officer of AOL Time Warner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By David Ng
In a surprise announcement, the financially troubled Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington has entered into an agreement to be taken over by the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University. The deal, announced on Wednesday, would mark the largest takeover of an arts institution in the nation's capital in recent memory. The Corcoran, which is a private, nonprofit organization, has experienced financial difficulties for years and had recently explored a potential partnership with the University of Maryland.
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NEWS
September 19, 1989 | ELIZABETH KASTOR, The Washington Post
The director and executive trustees of the embattled Corcoran Gallery of Art issued a statement Monday expressing "regret" for offending members of the arts community with their cancellation of a show of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs, and said: "Our course in the future will be to support art, artists and freedom of artistic expression."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The Corcoran Gallery of Art has apparently had a rare bout of clear-headed good sense: Its board of trustees has decided the Washington museum should remain in its historic building near the White House, the Associated Press reports. Museum leaders had caused an uproar by suggesting that the cash-strapped institution might attempt to sell the building and move to the suburbs. A six-month study appears to have persuaded them to stay put. The Corcoran's magnificent Beaux-Arts building was designed by Ernest Flagg and opened to the public in 1897 with President Grover Cleveland and his Cabinet in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1989 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Christina Orr-Cahall has taken the fall for the outlandish shenanigans of Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art during the past six months, observers immediately have begun to ask: Who will replace her as director of the once-venerable, now-sullied, museum? Alas, we ought to be asking something slightly different: Who in their right mind would want to? Let me explain. The Corcoran's problems are far from over.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The board of Washington's beleaguered Corcoran Gallery of Art played for time Monday, appointing a committee to study "some concerns," including whether the famed art center should fire its director. The decision to name a committee to study the fate of Christina Orr-Cahall--as well as issues of staff morale and exhibition policies--came at a meeting of the Corcoran board had been widely expected to result in the Orr-Cahall's dismissal or forced resignation.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The embattled director of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, whose cancellation of an exhibition that included sexually explicit photographs ignited a firestorm of controversy, resigned Monday. In a letter to Freeborn G. Jewett, president of the museum's board of trustees, Christina Orr-Cahall cited "extraneous and disruptive difficulties" of the last several months that had put the museum's future in doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
In 1869, philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran founded an art museum here to "promote the American genius." In time, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Corcoran School of Art, which today has more than 900 students, grew to become one of the most significant artistic forces on the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A major show of work of the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe--due to open here July 1--was canceled Tuesday in what apparently is the latest development in an escalating political controversy that has embroiled the National Endowment for the Arts. Cancellation of "Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment" was announced as a second dispute involving the endowment--this one over the endowment's support of a photograph of a crucifix seemingly immersed in urine--has grown in the last few days into a confrontation between the endowment and several conservative senators.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The in Washington has announced the resignation of its chief curator, who left as an apparent result of the gallery's decision to cancel a show of work by the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. The resignation of Jane Livingston was announced by the gallery late Wednesday. She is currently on a six-month leave of absence working, under a Guggenheim fellowship, on a book titled "The New York School: Photography, 1936-1963."
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | The Washington Post
Two top executives of America Online and their wives have jointly pledged $30 million to the Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art and Design, the largest single donation in the museum's 132-year history. The gift is earmarked for a $120-million addition to the facility. The donors are Robert and Veronique Pittman and Barry and Tracy Schuler of Great Falls, Va. Robert Pittman, 47, is to be co-chief operating officer of AOL Time Warner.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
Now that the stunning response to Frank Gehry's design for the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, has established that a single building can turn a fading industrial city into a mecca for the world's cultural elite, a host of art institutions seem determined to emulate Bilbao's success. Before Gehry's museum opened, nearly two years ago, few Americans could accurately pinpoint the city on a map. Today, it is at the center of everyone's cultural radar.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1989 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Christina Orr-Cahall has taken the fall for the outlandish shenanigans of Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art during the past six months, observers immediately have begun to ask: Who will replace her as director of the once-venerable, now-sullied, museum? Alas, we ought to be asking something slightly different: Who in their right mind would want to? Let me explain. The Corcoran's problems are far from over.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The embattled director of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, whose cancellation of an exhibition that included sexually explicit photographs ignited a firestorm of controversy, resigned Monday. In a letter to Freeborn G. Jewett, president of the museum's board of trustees, Christina Orr-Cahall cited "extraneous and disruptive difficulties" of the last several months that had put the museum's future in doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
In 1869, philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran founded an art museum here to "promote the American genius." In time, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Corcoran School of Art, which today has more than 900 students, grew to become one of the most significant artistic forces on the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The board of Washington's beleaguered Corcoran Gallery of Art played for time Monday, appointing a committee to study "some concerns," including whether the famed art center should fire its director. The decision to name a committee to study the fate of Christina Orr-Cahall--as well as issues of staff morale and exhibition policies--came at a meeting of the Corcoran board had been widely expected to result in the Orr-Cahall's dismissal or forced resignation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The Corcoran Gallery of Art has apparently had a rare bout of clear-headed good sense: Its board of trustees has decided the Washington museum should remain in its historic building near the White House, the Associated Press reports. Museum leaders had caused an uproar by suggesting that the cash-strapped institution might attempt to sell the building and move to the suburbs. A six-month study appears to have persuaded them to stay put. The Corcoran's magnificent Beaux-Arts building was designed by Ernest Flagg and opened to the public in 1897 with President Grover Cleveland and his Cabinet in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By David Ng
In a surprise announcement, the financially troubled Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington has entered into an agreement to be taken over by the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University. The deal, announced on Wednesday, would mark the largest takeover of an arts institution in the nation's capital in recent memory. The Corcoran, which is a private, nonprofit organization, has experienced financial difficulties for years and had recently explored a potential partnership with the University of Maryland.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | ELIZABETH KASTOR, The Washington Post
The director and executive trustees of the embattled Corcoran Gallery of Art issued a statement Monday expressing "regret" for offending members of the arts community with their cancellation of a show of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs, and said: "Our course in the future will be to support art, artists and freedom of artistic expression."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The in Washington has announced the resignation of its chief curator, who left as an apparent result of the gallery's decision to cancel a show of work by the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. The resignation of Jane Livingston was announced by the gallery late Wednesday. She is currently on a six-month leave of absence working, under a Guggenheim fellowship, on a book titled "The New York School: Photography, 1936-1963."
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