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Corinthian Colleges Inc

BUSINESS
January 25, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Santa Ana-based Corinthian Colleges Inc., which specializes in schools for healthcare professionals, said Monday that the Securities and Exchange Commission ended an informal inquiry without recommending action. Corinthian shares rose $1.74 to $18.86 on Nasdaq, their biggest gain in four months. The SEC was reviewing the company's projections, financial statements and communications with analysts and investors during the fiscal year ended June 30 and for the quarter ended Sept. 30.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Corinthian Colleges Inc., which specializes in schools for healthcare professionals, named board member Jack Massimino as president and chief executive, effective immediately. The shares fell nearly 12%. Massimino, 55, who has been on Corinthian's board for six years, succeeds David Moore, the Santa Ana-based company said. Moore, 66, will remain chairman. Massimino takes over as the company faces an investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission into financial statements.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Corinthian Colleges Inc., facing state and federal investigations, said Wednesday that its Bryman College campus in San Jose was again able to comply with the U.S. Education Department's rules to receive tuition reimbursements in advance. The Santa Ana company, one of the largest for-profit operators of trade and technical colleges in the U.S. and Canada, acknowledged in June that a government review had found that the San Jose campus failed to meet student financial aid requirements.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Corinthian Colleges Inc., already hit with federal and state investigations, said Monday that the Securities and Exchange Commission has launched an informal probe into the company. The SEC is looking at company statements and performance during the fiscal year that ended June 30 and for the quarter ending Sept. 30, Corinthian said in a statement. The company said it believed the SEC also was looking at a U.S.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2004 | Dana Calvo, Special to The Times
With a successful business as a personal chef, Elizabeth Simek was living the dream of every weekend gourmet. Her Busy B's Personal Chef Service was pulling in more than $50,000 a year. But Simek worried that it wouldn't last. So the Peoria, Ariz., entrepreneur set out to earn a bachelor's degree in business management through an online program from Florida Metropolitan University, one of dozens of trade and technical colleges run by Santa Ana-based Corinthian Colleges Inc.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2004 | Dana Calvo, Special to The Times
Corinthian Colleges Inc. reported a 6% increase in quarterly net income Wednesday despite heavy spending on its schools and turmoil caused by a federal investigation and several lawsuits. The Santa Ana-based education company's earnings were slightly better than Wall Street's recently diminished expectations, pushing its shares up $2.64, or 23%, to $14.01 on Nasdaq. For its fiscal fourth quarter ended June 30, Corinthian earned $19.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
K-Swiss Inc., an athletic-shoe maker that split its shares and doubled its dividend in December, cut its 2004 profit and sales forecasts after orders from Foot Locker Inc. dropped. Its shares fell 21%. K-Swiss expects to earn $1.40 to $1.50 a share this year, down from its earlier forecast of $1.50 to $1.65, on sales of $460 million to $480 million. The company reported net income of $1.32 a share on sales of $429.2 million in 2003. Shares of Westlake Village-based K-Swiss fell $5.06 to $19.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. stock exchanges, reacting to the recent dispute over trading in Corinthian Colleges Inc., said Tuesday that they would coordinate trading halts when there was "extraordinary market activity" in shares listed on Nasdaq. The seven markets that trade Nasdaq stocks agreed that the electronic market may halt trading in a stock if a systems failure could not be resolved within five minutes of notifying other markets.
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