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NEWS
June 25, 1991 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Yuppie flu," a shadowy but genuine ailment with no known cause or cure, is nothing new despite its trendy name.
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NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
Xerox Corp.'s program for managing diversity is one company's response to dramatic changes taking place in the U.S. work force. A report by the Hudson Institute, "Workforce 2000: Work and Workers for the 21st Century," predicts: * Only 15% of the net new entrants into the labor force over the next 10 years will be native-born white males, compared to 47% today.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene onstage: "Charles Henderson," a Xerox manager, is explaining to "Gloria Reed," a young black engineer, his decision to name another employee--a white man like himself--to a project to which she had hoped to be assigned. And, oh yes, one other thing: Gloria is going to be sharing a work space with a clerical worker, who also happens to be a black woman. Was this art imitating life? If so, the Xerox Corp. wants to make some changes.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day, someone might make a movie about Martin Bernal. It would probably be a small, British-made film. It would need a screenplay that captured, with a gesture or a word, the social and intellectual climate of the United States and England at the end of the 20th Century. But most of all, it would be a character study of an English-born scholar--son and grandson of two renowned intellectuals--who rocked the status quo and fell from grace. What Bernal rocked was the cradle of civilization.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"He who has been tortured," Jean Amery observed, "remains tortured." The epigraph, which appears at the outset of "In the Shadow of the Holocaust," is an eloquent summing up of the fate of the men and women who, by accident or miracle or act of heroism, managed to survive Auschwitz or Babi Yar or the Warsaw Ghetto. But what is the fate of the children of survivors, the young men and women who call themselves the "Second Generation?"
SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, aided by a confused referee who gave Cornell a fifth down with three seconds to play, the Big Red beat Dartmouth, 7-3, in a memorable football game at Hanover, N.H. Fifty years later, on Saturday, much the same thing happened at Columbia, Mo., when Colorado beat Missouri, 33-31, on a fifth-down touchdown. On the surface, the two finishes are strikingly similar: Seconds remaining . . . confused officials . . . a winning play . . . angry protests. There is one major difference.
BOOKS
June 24, 1990 | ALEX RAKSIN
It's difficult to find two cultures more dramatically different than America and Japan. While Americans in pursuit of the Dream will blithely slacken ties to extended family, the Japanese are preoccupied with winning respect within the family. While Americans celebrate promotions as symbols of money, prestige and freedom, the Japanese at least seem to accept them somberly, as burdens to be fulfilled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
Somewhere in the lofty towers of the central library at UC San Diego, an unfamiliar but pleasing sound came ringing forth Wednesday afternoon, and just about everyone turned to look. What they heard was not bells, although it sounded like bells. They were chimes from a computer-controlled carillon, which a 95-year-old La Jolla man donated to the school in memory of his wife.
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