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Corporate Donations

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NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A nonprofit advocacy group allied with President Obama revealed Thursday that it would decline corporate donations and release more information about its contributors, but the decision did not placate campaign finance reform advocates who said the organization still provided big donors a conduit for access to the White House. Jim Messina, who managed Obama's 2012 reelection campaign and is now chairman of Organizing for Action, announced the changes after a torrent of criticism from reform advocates, as well as Republicans, about the group's fundraising plans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 26, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
More than a month after the bombings that took three lives and wounded more than 260 people, thousands of runners got the chance to reclaim an experience that had been robbed of them -- crossing the finish line at the Boston Marathon. About 3,000 marathon participants and bombing victims gathered in light rain Saturday to run the final mile of the race while honoring those affected by the tragedy and emergency workers in an event known as OneRun, spokeswoman Kathleen McGonagle said.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Corporate donations to charitable causes edged up 2% last year to $6 billion, the third consecutive year of sluggish industry giving, according to a survey released Sunday. The slump was seen as partly reflecting the recession's drag on corporate profits, which has forced cutbacks in functions regarded as less essential than core company operations.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The nonprofit advocacy group that was formed to back President Obama's agenda, which was sharply criticized as a potential conduit for wealthy interests to influence the White House, has been financed overwhelmingly by thousands of small donors since its launch in late January. Organizing for Action took in just three six-figure donations through the end of March. The biggest, $250,000, came from a son of Warren Buffett's longtime business partner. Only about two dozen of the 770 fundraisers who collected major donations for Obama's reelection gave to the organization, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2003 | Jeffrey L. Rabin and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
Arnold Schwarzenegger's corporate backers, including a collection agency, a mortgage banking firm and the parent company of a major Orange County Mercedes-Benz dealership, have pumped major contributions into his pro-recall campaign in recent days. And Schwarzenegger continues to fund his own efforts generously: His campaign reported at the end of last week that the actor had donated $500,000 to his Total Recall Committee, which is supporting the removal of Gov.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republican Gov. Pete Wilson solicits potential investors in Asia, the chairman of the state Democratic Party contends that the governor's travels may have been illegally financed by corporate donations. Democratic Party leader Bill Press has demanded an investigation by the state Fair Political Practices Commission into the underwriting of Wilson's travel costs by 25 big-name corporate contributors.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The state's chief elections officer, accused of mishandling the presidential vote in Ohio, sent a fundraising letter for his own 2006 gubernatorial campaign that was accompanied by a request for illegal contributions. A pledge card with the letter from Secretary of State J. Kenneth Blackwell, a Republican who co-chaired the Bush-Cheney election campaign in Ohio, said, "Corporate and personal checks are welcome." Corporate donations are illegal in Ohio.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
A day after a Chicago official said Chick-fil-A would stop giving money to anti-gay marriage groups, the fast-food chain issued a statement saying that “for many months now” its corporate donations have “been mischaracterized.” In the statement , the Atlanta-based company said that while its “sincere intent has been to remain out of this political and social debate,” it keeps getting dragged back in. On Wednesday, Chicago Alderman...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
What if you have an AIDS benefit and not enough corporate donors donate? That seems to be Elizabeth Taylor's problem in Miami, where she is hosting a $5,000-a-head, star-studded gala on Sunday to raise money for AIDS care and research. It now appears, say organizers, that the fund-raiser won't reach its $3-million goal because corporate donors are balking.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A nonprofit advocacy group allied with President Obama revealed Thursday that it would decline corporate donations and release more information about its contributors, but the decision did not placate campaign finance reform advocates who said the organization still provided big donors a conduit for access to the White House. Jim Messina, who managed Obama's 2012 reelection campaign and is now chairman of Organizing for Action, announced the changes after a torrent of criticism from reform advocates, as well as Republicans, about the group's fundraising plans.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - The nonprofit advocacy group formed to bolster President Obama's agenda has reversed its decision to accept corporate donations and promised more transparency about its contributors after fielding a torrent of criticism about its fundraising structure. Jim Messina, chairman of Organizing for Action, announced the changes in an op-ed published Thursday on CNN.com . “There has been some confusion about what Organizing for Action is and is not,” he wrote.
OPINION
January 16, 2013 | By Sheila Krumholz
Getting elected president costs a lot of money, and so does being inaugurated. In 2009, President Obama's inaugural committee spent $45 million to kick off his first term. Even with scaled-back festivities (two balls instead of 10), this year's inauguration will still cost tens of millions. And that money must be raised in much the same way campaigns raise funds, with requests to supporters. Those who ante up include both corporations and well-heeled individuals. Do they expect something in return beyond the thrill of attending?
NATIONAL
January 10, 2013 | Matea Gold and Christi Parsons
Even before Barack Obama was sworn in as president the first time, he touted his efforts to "change business as usual in Washington" by setting strict rules for his inauguration: No corporate donations were allowed; individuals could give only $50,000. This time, Obama's inaugural committee is seeking million-dollar contributions from corporations and offering perks in return, such as tickets to the official ball. The six companies that have given so far include AT&T, Microsoft and Financial Innovations, a marketing company that received $15.7 million to produce merchandise for Obama's reelection campaign and is the official vendor for the inauguration.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Melanie Mason
President Obama will accept corporate contributions to pay for his inauguration in January, a departure from his first inauguration and the 2012 Democratic convention in Charlotte, N.C. The decision, first reported by Politico, underscores how the president's stated desire to limit the influence of money and politics can at times create friction with the practical need of quickly financing large political events. “To help cover the cost of the public events, the 2013 Presidential Inaugural Committee will be accepting contributions from individual and institutional donors in compliance with the laws governing contributions to an Inaugural Committee,” said Addie Whisenant, the committee's spokeswoman.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2012 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democratic convention organizers broke their pledge to put on their quadrennial gathering in Charlotte, N.C., this year without corporate donations, using $5 million from a committee financed by companies such as Bank of America, Duke Energy and AT&T to rent the Time Warner Arena for the three-day event. The payments, revealed in reports filed Wednesday evening with the Federal Election Commission, came after party officials said they would produce the convention without corporate money, a self-imposed ban set by the Democratic National Committee.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The nonprofit advocacy group that was formed to back President Obama's agenda, which was sharply criticized as a potential conduit for wealthy interests to influence the White House, has been financed overwhelmingly by thousands of small donors since its launch in late January. Organizing for Action took in just three six-figure donations through the end of March. The biggest, $250,000, came from a son of Warren Buffett's longtime business partner. Only about two dozen of the 770 fundraisers who collected major donations for Obama's reelection gave to the organization, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | ROBERTA G. WAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If not for Valley-based businesses, there wouldn't be much music, art or theater for residents to enjoy, arts organizations say. And even that precarious funding is in jeopardy because of corporate mergers, the changing way companies spend their discretionary dollars and the inability of small arts organizations to devote the time and resources necessary to woo corporate donations.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
A day after a Chicago official said Chick-fil-A would stop giving money to anti-gay marriage groups, the fast-food chain issued a statement saying that “for many months now” its corporate donations have “been mischaracterized.” In the statement , the Atlanta-based company said that while its “sincere intent has been to remain out of this political and social debate,” it keeps getting dragged back in. On Wednesday, Chicago Alderman...
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
Occasionally The Times publishes a story that leaves little room for debate, where the reader letters come down so uniformly on one side of the issue that putting a positive spin on the article would seem impossible. Monday's front-page article, " AT&T wields enormous power in Sacramento ," was one such story. None of the roughly two-dozen reader submissions sent to letters@latimes.com (two of which were published on Monday's page ) even attempted to note a remotely apologetic aspect of AT&T's grip on California lawmakers.
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