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Corporation For Public Broadcasting

BUSINESS
September 29, 1999
* Award-winning broadcaster Frank Cruz on Tuesday was elected chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Washington-based nonprofit group that funds the programming and operations of public radio and television stations nationwide. The election of Cruz reflects the organization's emphasis on diversity, one of the CPB's top three budget and policy priorities in the coming year. The CPB has appropriated $7 million of its $300-million budget toward diversity programming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Perennially cash-strapped public television producers and filmmakers would ordinarily be thrilled that the Corporation for Public Broadcasting recently unveiled a long-awaited initiative to fund $20 million worth of documentaries on post-Sept. 11 terrorist attack themes. Instead, a recent forum in New York where the organization's executives explained more precisely what kinds of programs they are seeking for "America at a Crossroads" turned into a shouting and name-calling session.
OPINION
June 26, 2005
The Republican critics of public broadcasting have a point: It is outrageous that a medium supported by taxpayers should have a clear partisan slant. So please, get the Republicans out of it. Conservatives have been taking aim at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for more than a decade.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public broadcasters asked Capitol Hill for half a billion dollars Wednesday to help it meet a government-mandated transition to digital technology. But rather than commitments of financial support, organizations such as the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio got an earful from Republican lawmakers about the perceived liberal bias of their programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Barksdale Reading Institute have pledged a combined $11 million to fund the PBS Kids' series "Between the Lions," a learn-to-read program with high success rates in poor, rural communities. Several university studies have shown increases in literacy skills among children who watched the program at schools in Kansas, Mississippi and New Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which last year drew congressional ire for allegedly funding a public-TV show on gay life, is under fire by one of its own directors--this time for supporting a Los Angeles radio station that he says has aired racist and anti-Semitic programs. Vic Gold, a Washington author who serves on the nine-member CPB board, said he wants the powerful corporation to withdraw about $175,000 in annual financial support it gives Los Angeles' KPFK-FM (90.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senate Republicans, upset with what they claim is a liberal bias in public broadcasting, are close to forcing Democrats to accept amendments and compromise wording in a bill to fund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for 1994 through 1996, according to sources on both sides. Among the changes expected in the $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As criticism of public television and radio from the conservative right becomes increasingly vocal in this election year, officials in public broadcasting say they are bracing for attacks on the order of those that have been volleyed at the National Endowment for the Arts for the past several years. "I'm prepared for it," said John Lawson, director of national affairs for America's Public Television Stations, public broadcasting's lobbying arm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, an earthquake knocked the radio station at Cal State Northridge off the air. This month, a political temblor is rattling KCSN. The new Republican majority in the House of Representatives is poised to end decades of public funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which supports more than 1,000 public radio and television stations nationwide. The prospect is causing static among stations that serve the San Fernando Valley.
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