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Corporation For Public Broadcasting

ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
For the second day in a row, shock waves rippled through the public broadcasting community Friday as news spread that Edward J. Pfister had resigned as president of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Pfister, 51, who has been in the job since September, 1981, tendered his resignation Thursday, to be effective Dec. 31. The corporation's board, however, has asked him to leave June 15.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 1999
* Award-winning broadcaster Frank Cruz on Tuesday was elected chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Washington-based nonprofit group that funds the programming and operations of public radio and television stations nationwide. The election of Cruz reflects the organization's emphasis on diversity, one of the CPB's top three budget and policy priorities in the coming year. The CPB has appropriated $7 million of its $300-million budget toward diversity programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Perennially cash-strapped public television producers and filmmakers would ordinarily be thrilled that the Corporation for Public Broadcasting recently unveiled a long-awaited initiative to fund $20 million worth of documentaries on post-Sept. 11 terrorist attack themes. Instead, a recent forum in New York where the organization's executives explained more precisely what kinds of programs they are seeking for "America at a Crossroads" turned into a shouting and name-calling session.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Bowing to calls to delay the selection of a new president amid concern that the leading candidate was too partisan, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting agreed Monday to wait until Wednesday to choose a new chief executive. Public broadcasting stations and a group of Democrats on Capitol Hill had pressed Kenneth Y.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public broadcasters asked Capitol Hill for half a billion dollars Wednesday to help it meet a government-mandated transition to digital technology. But rather than commitments of financial support, organizations such as the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and National Public Radio got an earful from Republican lawmakers about the perceived liberal bias of their programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, under orders by Congress to come up with a plan to become independent of federal funding for public TV and radio, submitted its report for cost savings and alternative revenue options on Tuesday but flatly concluded that these "could not compensate for a complete loss of the federal appropriation." "Continued public support is essential," said the corporation's 12-page report, entitled "Common Sense for the Future."
NATIONAL
June 14, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House Appropriations Committee voted Tuesday to restore $20 million of proposed cuts in federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which provides money to local public television and radio stations. The Bush administration originally proposed to cut about 37% of the federal funding for public broadcasting, and a subcommittee last week proposed a cut of $115 million, or 23%. A net cut of $95 million, if passed by the House and the Senate, would go into effect Oct. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Barksdale Reading Institute have pledged a combined $11 million to fund the PBS Kids' series "Between the Lions," a learn-to-read program with high success rates in poor, rural communities. Several university studies have shown increases in literacy skills among children who watched the program at schools in Kansas, Mississippi and New Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2005 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
The inspector general of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting is launching an investigation into whether public television and radio stations around the country inappropriately used federal funds to lobby against threatened budget cuts this summer. Kenneth A.
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