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Cosby Show Television Program

BUSINESS
December 9, 1989 | RICK DU BROW and DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiations for Marcy Carsey and Tom Werner, producers of "The Cosby Show" and "Roseanne," to assume control of CBS's low-rated entertainment division collapsed Friday. CBS has been seeking to fill the job since Kim LeMasters resigned as its entertainment president on Nov. 30, following the first two years in the network's history in which it finished in the ratings basement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
When reruns of "The Cosby Show" went into syndication a year ago, they were expected to hit TV like a megaton bomb, giving the 187 stations that bought them the kind of immense lift that NBC got from the original broadcasts of the series. Expectations for the reruns were so high that stations bid feverishly for the show, paying unprecedented prices that totaled more than $600 million in overall sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1988
NBC's top-rated "Cosby Show" will return for a sixth season in the fall of 1989, the network said Friday. The announcement ended speculation that Bill Cosby was planning to leave the series to pursue other interests. Cosby had suggested in the past that, the program's stellar ratings notwithstanding, he might leave "The Cosby Show" after five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The very existence of the television re-run business implies capitalizing on a residual affection built up over time. It doesn't matter if it's "The Gale Storm Show" or "Hill Street Blues." After all, TV is still the medium that plays to our living rooms and flickers at the end of our beds before we turn in for the night, a unifying force for the deep pockets of loneliness in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | PEGGY ZIEGLER, Peggy Ziegler is the Los Angeles bureau chief for Electronic Media, a weekly TV trade publication
Steve Cohen doesn't look like a nervous man. Settling back in his office, he discusses the coming TV season in measured tones, insisting that he isn't about to roll the dice on a move that could make his career--or break it. But certain station executives like Cohen--who is general manager of WCAU-TV, the CBS-owned-and-operated station in Philadelphia--look a lot like high rollers these days.
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