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IMAGE
January 10, 2010 | By Kavita Daswani
A $500 mini-makeover You're on a budget but still want to look your best. We asked cosmetic surgeons, dermatologists and aestheticians to weigh in on how you can get the most value for your beauty buck. "I have patients coming in and saying, "I've saved up $500. What can I do with it?" said Dr. Glynis Ablon, a dermatologist and assistant professor at UCLA. Her recommendation: Go for the treatment with the most obvious effect -- a laser session or combination of facial peel with Botox.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Robert J. Lopez
A woman who died this week after going into cardiac arrest at a beauty salon had undergone a cosmetic medical procedure that involved a part of her body being "augmented by injection," Long Beach police said. Long Beach police said that on Wednesday at about 12:20 p.m. they were called to Areli's Beauty Salon in the 2100 block of Pacific Avenue because someone was in cardiac arrest "under suspicious circumstances. " Authorities allege that 45-year-old Sandra Perez Gonzalez was renting space in the salon under the pretense of giving massages, but instead provided butt and lip augmentation and "vampire face lifts" -- a procedure in which a person's own blood cells are injected into their face -- without a license.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2010 | By Fred Tasker
In better economic times, some in search of youth and beauty thought nothing of plunking down thousands of dollars for a cosmetic procedure. These days, tummy tucks are on sale. What's more, recent figures from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery say the number of cosmetic procedures in the U.S. -- such as eyelid lifts and liposuction -- fell 17% from 2008 to 2009. "It's the economy. People don't have the disposable income," said Dr. Darryl Blinski, a Miami plastic surgeon.
HEALTH
August 16, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
A slew of nonsurgical body contouring treatments promising to zap inches on your lunch hour has taken off recently, ushering a flood of new patients - many of them men - into doctors' offices. However not all of these treatments, touted on talk shows and marketed at medical spa happy hours, are created equal, physicians say, and the cost can run well into the thousands, rivaling or even surpassing liposuction but with less dramatic results. "We are not talking about losing weight" with these treatments, says Grant Stevens, a Marina del Rey plastic surgeon whose practice does a booming business in body contouring.
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | Alene Dawson
Like it or not, plastic surgery is here to stay. Sure, some people will tout the virtues of self-acceptance and aging gracefully and lament that the rise of cosmetic procedures (including fillers, Botox and the like) signifies the swift decline of civilization. But in reality, as long as people see a benefit -- be it in their work, personal or sex lives -- from looking younger or correcting perceived flaws, plastic surgery will continue to be a solution. According to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 13,828,726 cosmetic procedures -- including the minimally invasive as well as the surgical -- were done in the U.S. last year.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Vanity, thy name is: dude?  Sort of, new statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons show.   Men are getting more plastic surgery, the organization trumpeted in a news release.  But women still receive 91% of cosmetic procedures. First, the guys:  Plastic surgery is up. The total number of surgeries performed on men increased 2% from 2009 to 2010, to 1.1 million.  The fastest-growing procedure?  Face-lifts, which went up 14% to 10,903 performed.   Men also got 10% more filler treatments (78,472)
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When John Tlapa looked in the mirror, his nose looked like he "could pick a door lock," he said. It resembled "a hook with a point on it. It was pretty ugly. " So two years ago, the San Diego-based screenwriter underwent rhinoplasty to improve his profile and fix a deviated septum that had plagued him for almost 40 years. Tlapa, 54, is part of a trend that, in recent years, has seen increasing numbers of men seeking cosmetic surgery. In 2011, 9% of surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the U.S. were conducted on men, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery - a 121% increase since 1997.
HEALTH
April 23, 2001 | Shari Roan
Americans are not shying away from cosmetic procedures, according to new statistics from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. The number of adults having some type of cosmetic procedure increased 25% between 1999 and 2000, to 5.7 million procedures. Botox injections have become the most popular cosmetic option, increasing 120% in one year. About 1.1 million shots of botox were given last year.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released its latest cosmetic and resconstructive surgery statistics on Monday.  Many of the trends were familiar.  In all, the group reported, Americans underwent 1.6 million cosmetic surgeries, including face-lifts, liposuction and rhinoplasty; 13 million minimally invasive procedures (think Botox injections) and 5.6 million reconstructive procedures (including tumor removal and scar revision).  People in the U.S. spent $11 billion on the cosmetic procedures alone.
HEALTH
August 16, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
A slew of nonsurgical body contouring treatments promising to zap inches on your lunch hour has taken off recently, ushering a flood of new patients - many of them men - into doctors' offices. However not all of these treatments, touted on talk shows and marketed at medical spa happy hours, are created equal, physicians say, and the cost can run well into the thousands, rivaling or even surpassing liposuction but with less dramatic results. "We are not talking about losing weight" with these treatments, says Grant Stevens, a Marina del Rey plastic surgeon whose practice does a booming business in body contouring.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released its latest cosmetic and resconstructive surgery statistics on Monday.  Many of the trends were familiar.  In all, the group reported, Americans underwent 1.6 million cosmetic surgeries, including face-lifts, liposuction and rhinoplasty; 13 million minimally invasive procedures (think Botox injections) and 5.6 million reconstructive procedures (including tumor removal and scar revision).  People in the U.S. spent $11 billion on the cosmetic procedures alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Hey, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joan Rivers isn't offended by your Botox gibe. Speaking to Harper's Bazaar , Paltrow, 40, an organic products and fitness advocate, recently said that there was a very specific reason she's staying away from one cosmetic procedure. And it happened to be the host of E!'s "Fashion Police. " "I would be scared to go under the knife, but you know, talk to me when I'm 50. I'll try anything," Paltrow said. "Except I won't do Botox again, because I looked crazy.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported Monday that chin implantation -- a.k.a. the "chinplant" -- was the fastest-growing cosmetic plastic surgery procedure in 2011.  "The chin and the jawline are among the first areas to show signs of aging," Dr. Malcolm Z. Roth, the organization's president, said in a statement. "People are considering chin augmentation as a way to restore their youthful look just like a facelift or eyelid surgery. " Overall, chin implants were up 71% over 2010, with procedures split more or less evenly between men (who had 10,593 of the surgeries)
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When Margaret first met her boyfriend, she weighed 105 pounds and wore short crop tops. But after 13 years together, the 55-year-old retiree from Torrance developed a "muffin top" that she just couldn't eliminate. So she did what so many other women do to get their bodies back: She had lipoplasty on her waist, hips and upper and lower abdomen in September. One week later, her boyfriend had lipoplasty for himself. "He hadn't thought about getting anything done, but after hearing how I would look afterward, he decided he should probably go ahead and have a little something done too," said Margaret, who asked that her last name not be used for privacy reasons.
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When John Tlapa looked in the mirror, his nose looked like he "could pick a door lock," he said. It resembled "a hook with a point on it. It was pretty ugly. " So two years ago, the San Diego-based screenwriter underwent rhinoplasty to improve his profile and fix a deviated septum that had plagued him for almost 40 years. Tlapa, 54, is part of a trend that, in recent years, has seen increasing numbers of men seeking cosmetic surgery. In 2011, 9% of surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the U.S. were conducted on men, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery - a 121% increase since 1997.
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | Alene Dawson
Like it or not, plastic surgery is here to stay. Sure, some people will tout the virtues of self-acceptance and aging gracefully and lament that the rise of cosmetic procedures (including fillers, Botox and the like) signifies the swift decline of civilization. But in reality, as long as people see a benefit -- be it in their work, personal or sex lives -- from looking younger or correcting perceived flaws, plastic surgery will continue to be a solution. According to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 13,828,726 cosmetic procedures -- including the minimally invasive as well as the surgical -- were done in the U.S. last year.
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When Margaret first met her boyfriend, she weighed 105 pounds and wore short crop tops. But after 13 years together, the 55-year-old retiree from Torrance developed a "muffin top" that she just couldn't eliminate. So she did what so many other women do to get their bodies back: She had lipoplasty on her waist, hips and upper and lower abdomen in September. One week later, her boyfriend had lipoplasty for himself. "He hadn't thought about getting anything done, but after hearing how I would look afterward, he decided he should probably go ahead and have a little something done too," said Margaret, who asked that her last name not be used for privacy reasons.
NEWS
August 23, 2009 | Donna Abu-Nasr, Abu-Nasr writes for the Associated Press.
Does Islam frown on nose jobs? Chemical peels? How about breast implants? One of the clerics with the answers is Sheik Mohammed Nujaimi, and Saudi women flock to him for guidance about going under the knife. The results may not see much light of day in a kingdom where women cover up from head to toe, yet cosmetic surgery is booming. Religion covers every facet of life in Saudi Arabia, including plastic surgery. Nujaimi draws his guidelines from the consensus that was reached three years ago when clergymen and plastic surgeons met in Riyadh to determine whether cosmetic procedures violate the Islamic tenet against tampering with God's creation.
IMAGE
March 27, 2011 | By Kavita Daswan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Trout pout" ? overly plumped lips that are ubiquitous on Hollywood's red carpets ? can afflict any woman who has tried to enhance naturally thin lips. But a technique from Europe that's rolling out across cosmetic surgery practices in Beverly Hills and beyond aims to counteract the billowy, bee-stung lips that are the result of having fillers, collagen and fat injected into the area. PermaLip, an Food and Drug Administration-approved implant that looks like a clear-colored piece of elastic, is now being used in practices in Florida, Texas, New York and California.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Vanity, thy name is: dude?  Sort of, new statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons show.   Men are getting more plastic surgery, the organization trumpeted in a news release.  But women still receive 91% of cosmetic procedures. First, the guys:  Plastic surgery is up. The total number of surgeries performed on men increased 2% from 2009 to 2010, to 1.1 million.  The fastest-growing procedure?  Face-lifts, which went up 14% to 10,903 performed.   Men also got 10% more filler treatments (78,472)
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