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Cosmetic Surgery

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MAGAZINE
October 16, 1988
In reference to Paddy Calistro's Looks column "The Second Time Around" (Aug. 24): One reason for the rise in cosmetic surgery revisions is the general public's lack of awareness that "cosmetic surgeons" each have varying medical and surgical backgrounds. Ophthalmologists, ear, nose and throat specialists, dermatologists, general surgeons and plastic and reconstructive surgeons all do cosmetic surgery with varying degrees of expertise. Asking if the doctor is board-certified is not enough.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 23, 2014
Re "Money won't buy you votes," Opinion, April 20 Law professor Peter H. Schuck makes the ridiculous suggestion that because the amount of money spent in the 2012 election was considerably less than what Americans spent on cosmetic surgery in 2011, we shouldn't worry about it. Then he notes that campaign spending as a share of the gross domestic product has not risen appreciably for more than a century. Why should campaign spending be related to economic output? Schuck cites a study finding that an extra $175,000 in campaign spending increases a candidate's vote tally by a third of a percentage point.
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OPINION
January 4, 2012 | By Alexander Edmonds
The faulty breast implants made by the French company Poly Implants Protheses, or PIP, have grabbed headlines around the world in recent weeks, and it's no wonder. The prostheses are more prone to rupture than other models, and they contain an industrial grade of silicone never intended for use in a medical device. The scandal is also global in scope. Sold in 65 countries, the implants were re-branded by a Dutch company registered in Cyprus, offered on credit in Venezuela and smuggled into Bolivia, where they were bought by medical tourists.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released its latest cosmetic and resconstructive surgery statistics on Monday.  Many of the trends were familiar.  In all, the group reported, Americans underwent 1.6 million cosmetic surgeries, including face-lifts, liposuction and rhinoplasty; 13 million minimally invasive procedures (think Botox injections) and 5.6 million reconstructive procedures (including tumor removal and scar revision).  People in the U.S. spent $11 billion on the cosmetic procedures alone.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
There's a lot to consider before having cosmetic surgery -- the cost, the procedure, the risks and, of course, the doctor. Here are two experts who can help with those decisions. Reconstructive surgeon Dr. Paul Wigoda -- and medical malpractice attorney Sarah Steinbaum -- will be guests on a live Web chat Friday (noon EST, 11 a.m. CST and 9 a.m. PST). The online discussion will focus on how to shop for a plastic surgeon, what expectations are realistic and related topics. So come join the online chat with your own set of questions.
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Several studies show that some people who repeatedly seek cosmetic surgery are afflicted with a mental disorder called body dysmorphic disorder. But undergoing a nip here, tuck there or a poke between the eyes does nothing to improve the mental condition of these people, according to a new study. Body dysmorphic disorder is a condition in which people become preoccupied with their looks to the point of being obsessed over minor flaws or perceived imperfections. They often become so addled by their obsession over physical beauty they become dysfunctional in other aspects of their lives.
HEALTH
August 30, 2010 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I don't have anything against cosmetic surgery. No amount of running or iron pumping was going to do anything about the genetically programmed dark circles under my eyes, so I got those things zapped with a nuclear-powered laser that made me twitch and fidget in the chair like a spider monkey coming off a meth bender. Cosmetic surgery can, quite simply, do things that diet and exercise can't. If you've got something that looks like that mutant from "Total Recall" hanging off your stomach telling you to "start the reactor," and it bothers you more than the sizeable surgery scars will, then getting some work done on this area could be an option.
WORLD
January 2, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Shoqofa never liked her nose. She thought it was too wide. Her father told her not to worry; it was given to her by Allah. But when the 22-year-old started working at a beauty salon, she had the means and freedom to do something about it. Six months ago, she had rhinoplasty at one of several new private clinics offering cosmetic surgery in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital. She paid for it herself, telling her father that she was seeing a doctor about a mole.
WORLD
January 2, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Shoqofa never liked her nose. She thought it was too wide. Her father told her not to worry; it was given to her by Allah. But when the 22-year-old started working at a beauty salon, she had the means and freedom to do something about it. Six months ago, she had rhinoplasty at one of several new private clinics offering cosmetic surgery in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital. She paid for it herself, telling her father that she was seeing a doctor about a mole.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported Monday that chin implantation -- a.k.a. the "chinplant" -- was the fastest-growing cosmetic plastic surgery procedure in 2011.  "The chin and the jawline are among the first areas to show signs of aging," Dr. Malcolm Z. Roth, the organization's president, said in a statement. "People are considering chin augmentation as a way to restore their youthful look just like a facelift or eyelid surgery. " Overall, chin implants were up 71% over 2010, with procedures split more or less evenly between men (who had 10,593 of the surgeries)
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When Margaret first met her boyfriend, she weighed 105 pounds and wore short crop tops. But after 13 years together, the 55-year-old retiree from Torrance developed a "muffin top" that she just couldn't eliminate. So she did what so many other women do to get their bodies back: She had lipoplasty on her waist, hips and upper and lower abdomen in September. One week later, her boyfriend had lipoplasty for himself. "He hadn't thought about getting anything done, but after hearing how I would look afterward, he decided he should probably go ahead and have a little something done too," said Margaret, who asked that her last name not be used for privacy reasons.
IMAGE
April 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When John Tlapa looked in the mirror, his nose looked like he "could pick a door lock," he said. It resembled "a hook with a point on it. It was pretty ugly. " So two years ago, the San Diego-based screenwriter underwent rhinoplasty to improve his profile and fix a deviated septum that had plagued him for almost 40 years. Tlapa, 54, is part of a trend that, in recent years, has seen increasing numbers of men seeking cosmetic surgery. In 2011, 9% of surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the U.S. were conducted on men, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery - a 121% increase since 1997.
OPINION
January 4, 2012 | By Alexander Edmonds
The faulty breast implants made by the French company Poly Implants Protheses, or PIP, have grabbed headlines around the world in recent weeks, and it's no wonder. The prostheses are more prone to rupture than other models, and they contain an industrial grade of silicone never intended for use in a medical device. The scandal is also global in scope. Sold in 65 countries, the implants were re-branded by a Dutch company registered in Cyprus, offered on credit in Venezuela and smuggled into Bolivia, where they were bought by medical tourists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | From a Los Angeles Times staff writer
A San Francisco man with no medical license performed liposuction on a woman while smoking a cigar, then flushed 6 pounds of fat he removed down her toilet, a newspaper reported Friday. Carlos Guzmangarza, 49, was arrested Thursday on suspicion of posing as a physician assistant to perform cosmetic surgery on the woman and treat her daughter for acne, said Stephanie Ong Stillman, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco district attorney's office. Guzmangarza is accused of operating a bogus clinic on Mission Street called the Derma Clinic, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
There's a lot to consider before having cosmetic surgery -- the cost, the procedure, the risks and, of course, the doctor. Here are two experts who can help with those decisions. Reconstructive surgeon Dr. Paul Wigoda -- and medical malpractice attorney Sarah Steinbaum -- will be guests on a live Web chat Friday (noon EST, 11 a.m. CST and 9 a.m. PST). The online discussion will focus on how to shop for a plastic surgeon, what expectations are realistic and related topics. So come join the online chat with your own set of questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Premiering Sunday on E! (exclamation point theirs), "Bridalplasty" is a series in which, to steal a headline from a network press release, "Brides-to-Be Compete in Wedding-Themed Challenges Collecting Extreme Plastic Surgery Procedures While Trying to Win a Dream Celebrity-Style Wedding. " I'm sure it's all the same to E! whether you are delighted or horrified by this idea, as long as you watch. But I would not encourage it. If you believe that we own our own bodies, it's hard to argue against cosmetic surgery on any sort of moral grounds.
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