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Cosmetic Surgery

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Medical experts say cosmetic surgery should be performed only on relatively healthy people. But Donda West, the 58-year-old mother of rapper Kanye West, had a number of serious health issues, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar and cardiac artery blockage, according to an autopsy report released this week. Still, a Brentwood plastic surgeon approved her for extensive cosmetic surgery last year. She died Nov.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 1991 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plastic surgeons say a new law eliminating elective cosmetic surgery as a federal income tax deduction is silly and unenforceable. Beginning today, elective cosmetic surgery will no longer be deductible as a medical expense. Lawmakers passed the proposal in hopes of adding about $270 million a year to the nation's coffers. "It's an unnecessary piece of legislation--I think it's absurd," said Dr. Alan Gold, a Garden City, N.Y., plastic surgeon who has followed the issue closely.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | Rebecca Cook, Associated Press Writer
Nip, tuck and ... tax? Lawmakers trying to plump up the bottom line are considering a "vanity tax" on cosmetic surgery and Botox injections in Washington, Illinois and other states. Plastic surgeons and their patients say the idea is just plain ugly. "It makes no sense. Where does it stop -- massages, facials, teeth cleanings?" asked Karen Wakefield, 51, who has had a nose job, dermabrasion, liposuction, tummy tuck and breast lift -- plus a little Botox here and there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Who in Los Angeles in this day and age hasn't thought, if only for a fleeting moment, about the allure of cosmetic surgery? With the wave of a surgeon's wand you could erase those deepening crow's feet, lift that brow, augment those breasts. Gone the tire around the middle, the sagging thighs, the tired eyes. The ever quickening march of time, as inscribed on your body, stopped in its tracks. It is our duty, one might argue, in this bikini-clad, sun-soaked culture, to look our best.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking Pentagon lawyer has concluded that military hospitals that perform elective cosmetic surgeries are violating a 1979 law prohibiting operations that are medically unnecessary. The Times reported last month that military doctors worldwide were performing hundreds of cosmetic surgeries at taxpayer's expense, even though such surgeries are rarely covered by private health insurance or military health insurance, called CHAMPUS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2004 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
Resolving an impassioned turf battle between doctors and dentists, the California Senate voted Tuesday to allow dentists trained in surgery to perform elective cosmetic operations on the face. The bill would give new privileges only to several hundred oral surgeons -- dentists who complete a special surgery program. But the clash was one of the most intense this year, given the lucrative prize involved: California's ever-expanding market for cosmetic surgery. The measure now goes to Gov.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | ROBERT SCHEER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California has a reputation for imaginative charity bashes, but the cystic fibrosis fund-raiser of 1986 in Newport Beach set a new standard. Not only was the program interrupted by a surprise stripper, but one of the items on the block in the evening's auction was the services of Dr. Michael Elam, the much-sought-after cosmetic surgeon responsible for Phyllis Diller's latest face.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plastic surgery is medicine's final frontier: The only specialty in which doctors operate virtually free from the rules and monetary restrictions often imposed by managed care, since the procedures are almost always considered elective and are rarely covered by health plans.
HEALTH
March 4, 2002 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between the ages 25 and 65, the nose stretches by 10%, on average, its tip moving downward by about a quarter-inch. The brows can sink by a third of an inch, the ears by slightly more, the cheek tissue by as much as a half-inch. Overall, more than 30% of a person's facial area may drop from above the mid-face line into fleshy folds below. "At some point you look in the mirror and you just can't believe it's you," said B.J. Roberts, 71, of Los Angeles, who recently had cosmetic surgery.
NEWS
October 19, 2003 | Gary Schaefer, Associated Press Writer
Risa Arato never liked her hooded eyes -- even her friends said she had a perpetually stony gaze. And she hated the way her sunglasses slipped down her nose. But the clincher was meeting her estranged father for the first time since childhood and being told she hadn't turned out very cute.
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