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NEWS
February 1, 1996
After 15 years of warning women about expensive anti-aging ingredients that are all talk, wrinkle creams that don't erase lines and thigh creams that can't make you svelte ("Would my thighs look like this if any of that stuff works?"), Paula Begoun has switched careers. The author and consumer advocate who loves to punch holes in the cosmetic industry's claims is hoping her righteous rap will find her a place in the $30-billion-a-year business.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Cosmetics made with ingredients tested on animals is no longer allowed in the European Union, under a ban that took effect Monday. The European Commission, the governing body for the 27-country EU, said in a statement that the new rule “is in line with what many European citizens believe firmly: that the development of cosmetics does not warrant animal testing.” Officials said they plan to support development of alternative testing methods...
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BUSINESS
November 30, 2010 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
North Hollywood nail polish maker OPI Products Inc., best known for its nail lacquers inspired by celebrities including Katy Perry, Justin Bieber and Jennifer Lopez, has been purchased by cosmetics giant Coty Inc., the companies announced Monday. This latest acquisition by privately held Coty, which last year sold $4 billion worth of fragrances and other beauty products, comes amid a flurry of growth by the brand. Terms of the purchase were not disclosed. "It's time for a new era at OPI," said George Schaeffer, the company's co-founder and chief executive.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2010 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
North Hollywood nail polish maker OPI Products Inc., best known for its nail lacquers inspired by celebrities including Katy Perry, Justin Bieber and Jennifer Lopez, has been purchased by cosmetics giant Coty Inc., the companies announced Monday. This latest acquisition by privately held Coty, which last year sold $4 billion worth of fragrances and other beauty products, comes amid a flurry of growth by the brand. Terms of the purchase were not disclosed. "It's time for a new era at OPI," said George Schaeffer, the company's co-founder and chief executive.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2000 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Q: I am trying to fund a start-up loan for a small, high-end cosmetic boutique. I need a source for revenue numbers in cosmetic sales, broken down in average unit sales by department store or Web site purchase. --Dione Carston A: When my partner and I begin market research on an industry, the first place we go is to industry publications and associations. Most executives within a particular industry can easily refer you to some of these organizations. The Gale Group (http://www.galegroup.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Cosmetics made with ingredients tested on animals is no longer allowed in the European Union, under a ban that took effect Monday. The European Commission, the governing body for the 27-country EU, said in a statement that the new rule “is in line with what many European citizens believe firmly: that the development of cosmetics does not warrant animal testing.” Officials said they plan to support development of alternative testing methods...
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | JOYCE M. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Susan Yee is at home in a store. She's spent her whole career in retailing, and she loves to just be a consumer. But Yee also finds that shopping as an Asian woman can be frustrating, especially at cosmetics counters. Even with the wide palette of foundations and eye shadows offered by the big manufacturers, she can't find the shades that would highlight the yellow undertones of her complexion. Her five sisters and their friends have the same problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1985 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The better your appearance, the better people remember what you say, studies by a Scripps College professor indicate. Lynn Carol Miller says that studying hundreds of students over a five-year period has led her to conclude that communication between people can be enhanced by such things as the right hairdo and proper application of cosmetics on the speaker and by information-evoking cues from the listener.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE
The cosmetic industry expects to get a big lift from incoming First Lady Hillary Clinton. Noting that Clinton had a complete make-over during the presidential campaign (from Cristophe in Beverly Hills), cosmetic company executives are predicting a surge in hair lighteners, eye makeup, anti-wrinkle creams and facial scrubs. One firm, Cosmair Inc., is already boasting that Clinton uses its L'Oreal hair tint.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, Kathryn Bold is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
During a 1920s press conference with Max Factor, a reporter approached the legendary Hollywood makeup man and remarked, "How wonderful for you to be involved in makeup--it's an art." "It isn't art," replied the man who had no such illusions about cosmetics. "It's a business." Time proved Max Factor right. Worldwide cosmetics sales are expected to top $18 billion in 1990. "He knew back then," says Robert Salvatore, beauty director and curator of the Max Factor Museum of Beauty in Hollywood.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2000 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Q: I am trying to fund a start-up loan for a small, high-end cosmetic boutique. I need a source for revenue numbers in cosmetic sales, broken down in average unit sales by department store or Web site purchase. --Dione Carston A: When my partner and I begin market research on an industry, the first place we go is to industry publications and associations. Most executives within a particular industry can easily refer you to some of these organizations. The Gale Group (http://www.galegroup.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buying makeup on the Internet seems counterintuitive. After all, how can you choose the perfect foundation for your skin from a laptop screen? And aren't most cosmetics bought on impulse? You go in for mascara and come out with three lipsticks? Yet, since summer, there's been an e-commerce explosion in the cosmetics industry. Almost 20 Web sites selling prestige beauty products have launched or are planning to launch this fall: Ibeauty.com, Gloss.com, Eve.com, Beautyscene.com, Beautyjungle.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | JOYCE M. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Susan Yee is at home in a store. She's spent her whole career in retailing, and she loves to just be a consumer. But Yee also finds that shopping as an Asian woman can be frustrating, especially at cosmetics counters. Even with the wide palette of foundations and eye shadows offered by the big manufacturers, she can't find the shades that would highlight the yellow undertones of her complexion. Her five sisters and their friends have the same problem.
NEWS
February 1, 1996
After 15 years of warning women about expensive anti-aging ingredients that are all talk, wrinkle creams that don't erase lines and thigh creams that can't make you svelte ("Would my thighs look like this if any of that stuff works?"), Paula Begoun has switched careers. The author and consumer advocate who loves to punch holes in the cosmetic industry's claims is hoping her righteous rap will find her a place in the $30-billion-a-year business.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial regulation that exempted the food, drug and cosmetic industries from the full effect of the state's landmark toxic chemicals law will be repealed under an agreement announced Monday by the Wilson Administration and environmental groups. Lifting of the rule means that all food, drugs, cosmetics and medical devices must meet the strict standards of Proposition 65 by July 1, 1993--nearly seven years after the law was approved by the state's voters.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE
The cosmetic industry expects to get a big lift from incoming First Lady Hillary Clinton. Noting that Clinton had a complete make-over during the presidential campaign (from Cristophe in Beverly Hills), cosmetic company executives are predicting a surge in hair lighteners, eye makeup, anti-wrinkle creams and facial scrubs. One firm, Cosmair Inc., is already boasting that Clinton uses its L'Oreal hair tint.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial regulation that exempted the food, drug and cosmetic industries from the full effect of the state's landmark toxic chemicals law will be repealed under an agreement announced Monday by the Wilson Administration and environmental groups. Lifting of the rule means that all food, drugs, cosmetics and medical devices must meet the strict standards of Proposition 65 by July 1, 1993--nearly seven years after the law was approved by the state's voters.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buying makeup on the Internet seems counterintuitive. After all, how can you choose the perfect foundation for your skin from a laptop screen? And aren't most cosmetics bought on impulse? You go in for mascara and come out with three lipsticks? Yet, since summer, there's been an e-commerce explosion in the cosmetics industry. Almost 20 Web sites selling prestige beauty products have launched or are planning to launch this fall: Ibeauty.com, Gloss.com, Eve.com, Beautyscene.com, Beautyjungle.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the flowers on her one-acre estate, Madeleine Verdon loved her roses most: the imported French Josephines, white with dark pink centers, that grew beside full-blooming yellow ones; the small red buds, mixed among peach-colored petals, that seemed to burst open in a day. To Verdon, who tended them with a meticulousness never afforded her azaleas, they were a symbol of grace and delicacy.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, Kathryn Bold is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
During a 1920s press conference with Max Factor, a reporter approached the legendary Hollywood makeup man and remarked, "How wonderful for you to be involved in makeup--it's an art." "It isn't art," replied the man who had no such illusions about cosmetics. "It's a business." Time proved Max Factor right. Worldwide cosmetics sales are expected to top $18 billion in 1990. "He knew back then," says Robert Salvatore, beauty director and curator of the Max Factor Museum of Beauty in Hollywood.
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