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Cosmology

NEWS
October 16, 1990 | JOHN WILKES
Cosmology--the study of the universe and its origin--is perhaps science's grandest stage. But galaxies don't lend themselves to experiments as, say, atoms do. As a result, cosmology has historically occupied a place on the edge of science, say MIT physicist and essayist Alan Lightman and MIT graduate student Roberta Brawer in "Origins," a fascinating, surprisingly accessible and altogether human collection of conversations with today's leading cosmologists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1993 | RICHARD GUILLIATT, Richard Guilliatt is a free-lance writer based in New York.
Some performers keep scrapbooks of their past; Abbey Lincoln keeps history books. In her uptown Manhattan apartment, the jazz singer emerges from the study bearing two thick, black ring binders that she sets down on the dining room table. The carefully preserved press clippings between their covers record a life that has shifted gears as dramatically as the society around it. At first Anna Marie Wooldridge becomes Gaby Lee, a coquettish and beautiful 1950s supper club singer.
BOOKS
May 25, 1997 | K.C. COLE, K.C. Cole is a science writer for The Times
Almost 20 years ago, I tagged along with the great physicist Victor Weisskopf as he talked to a Cambridge, Mass., high school class about the Big Bang, the explosive origin of the universe. One student asked him what happened before the Bang, what caused the Bang? That question, said Weisskopf, fell outside the realm of physics. It was a question for God. Not anymore. Today, some scientists, it seems, just won't take no for an answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Neal Gabler
Back in May 2001, then-NBC President Robert Wright was fuming. He fired off a bristling letter to producers and executives throughout broadcast television, complaining that HBO was changing the rules of their medium. Wright's immediate gripe was an episode of "The Sopranos" where a young stripper was beaten to death by a berserk Mafioso. But his larger claim was that broadcast television was having a hard time competing with the cable network because it had the license of unexpurgated language, nudity and bloody violence that were proscribed to NBC. If only his network had the freedom of HBO, well . . . Wright might have honestly believed that the difference between NBC and HBO was a matter of cussing and graphic violence, but he could not have been more wrong, then or now. The real difference between broadcast television and cable is not that the Federal Communications Commission restricts one from doing what the other can. It's a matter of cosmology -- the way they perceive the universe.
OPINION
November 12, 1995 | Neal Gabler, Neal Gabler is the author of "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood." His new book is "Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Cult of Celebrity" (Knopf)
The story goes like this: During dinner at an opulent wedding reception, the groom rises from the head table and shushes the crowd. Everyone naturally assumes he is about to toast his bride and thank his guests. Instead, he solemnly announces that there has been a change of plan. He and his bride will be taking separate honeymoons and, when they return, the marriage will be annulled. The reason for this sudden turn of events, he says, is taped to the bottom of everyone's plate.
FOOD
June 1, 2012 | By Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
I'm not sure if it was the influence of some carne asada fries during a recent trip to San Diego or a dinner at Guelaguetza accompanied by a particularly potent dose of mezcal, but I had a dream about mole fries a few weeks ago. It was a rather vivid one, where the potatoes crackled with hot life, tangles of melted cheese stretched into infinity and whorls of ink-black sauce carried with them intimations of the yawning void. It wasn't dinner on that plate - it was a cosmology summarized as a plate of drunk food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Locals didn't find the ads, posted at the laundromat or running in the SuperSaver, to be strange at all. A number of people, in fact, reached out to Brian Wallenstein the "researcher looking to gather stories and information" for a book on Bigfoot and UFO sightings. A woman named Rudi emailed to report that she'd seen a bright disc hovering above Mt. Shasta. She attached a photo from a ski resort snow cam that showed a luminous speck. (Credible, Wallenstein thought.) A man named Larry recounted his own research — including telepathic communication with "them" — conducted in preparation for the day extraterrestrials would reveal themselves to earthlings.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Humans are on the cusp of discovering how the universe works on its biggest and smallest scales, Stephen Hawking said during a lecture Tuesday in Los Angeles. The renowned theoretical physicist made his name studying black holes, massive structures that anchor galaxies and whose gravity is so strong that not even light can escape. But on Tuesday, he delved into the world of microscopic cell biology to see first-hand how researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute are using stem cells to develop treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, the disease Hawking was diagnosed with in 1963.
OPINION
August 14, 2003
Kudos to K.C. Cole for the fascinating "A Whole Other Cosmos" (Column One, Aug. 12) and accompanying pictures of the Crab Nebula, showing how it looks when viewed through different devices, such as X-ray and infrared. Cosmology is a rapidly developing science with new discoveries and developments coming regularly. It is a tribute to Albert Einstein's genius that even now many of his theories are being confirmed, nearly a century after they were first postulated. Perhaps, as Cole writes, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna will give us the ability to "peer all the way back to the Big Bang Allen P. Wilkinson Whittier
SCIENCE
November 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Internationally renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has been appointed to the post of distinguished research chairman at a quantum theory and cosmology institute founded by Research In Motion co-Chief Executive Mike Lazaridis. Hawking, a professor at the University of Cambridge in England, will regularly be in residence at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, starting in the summer of 2009, the institute said in a statement. The Perimeter Institute was founded by Lazaridis in 1999 and began research operations in 2001.
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