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Cosmology

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | NONA YATES
The birth and death of stars, the future of the universe, stellar explosions and the origin of life are among the topics to be discussed at a symposium on "The Origin and Evolution of the Universe" Friday at UCLA. Hosted by the Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life, leading astronomers and astrophysicists will discuss details of some recent developments in cosmology. The program is suited for a general-interest audience and will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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OPINION
March 12, 1995
Religion and science are obviously not identical. But the growing prominence of cosmology, that branch of science that attempts to explain the order of the universe as a whole, has brought the two of late into a dialogue interrupted for centuries. The announcement last Tuesday that Paul Davies, an Australian mathematician and physicist, has won the annual, $1-million Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion, may stand as a minor milestone in that reconciliation.
NEWS
March 7, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
As cosmologists struggle to get a handle on the universe, their biggest adversary is time. Probing the whys and wherefores of the universe turns on getting information from sources that are millions (or even billions) of light-years away. That means they are also millions (or billions) of years back in time. Deciphering starlight is like reading a letter from a friend who writes that he's sitting at a window looking at the crocuses in bloom.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | K. C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Ever since people first stood up amid the tall grasses and looked about the world in wonder, religion, mythology and science all have struggled to explain how the world came to be. But when it comes to creation stories, few can hold a candle to the tale cooked up by modern cosmologists. Dialing back the cosmic clock about 15 billion years, they depict a time before time, a place before space existed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | David Colker, David Colker is a Times staff writer. His Internet address is colker@news.latimes.com
It was 1985 when I got off the train in Nara at dusk and began walking down a resi dential street lined with walled-in houses and gardens. It was the second week of my visit to Japan and I had just come from the fabled city of Kyoto, about half an hour away, where I spent the day wandering through temple grounds. Lost in thoughts about the day, I walked for several blocks in Nara before realizing I had not gone down the street leading to my minsuku , or inn. It was getting dark.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1993 | RICHARD GUILLIATT, Richard Guilliatt is a free-lance writer based in New York.
Some performers keep scrapbooks of their past; Abbey Lincoln keeps history books. In her uptown Manhattan apartment, the jazz singer emerges from the study bearing two thick, black ring binders that she sets down on the dining room table. The carefully preserved press clippings between their covers record a life that has shifted gears as dramatically as the society around it. At first Anna Marie Wooldridge becomes Gaby Lee, a coquettish and beautiful 1950s supper club singer.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
New evidence from the troubled Hubble Space Telescope suggests that the universe may be much older than many scientists believe. The results, to be presented today at a workshop in Sardinia, Italy, by a team headed by astronomer Allan R. Sandage of the Carnegie Institution observatories in Pasadena, may spark increased controversy in a cosmological community that is heatedly divided by the dispute over the universe's birth date.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Last year, astrophysicist George Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory got a very important message. From the beginning of time. Three weeks ago, he revealed that message, and the world, many people believe, changed forever. Smoot and his colleagues reported that they had detected microwave signals from the oldest and largest structures in the universe, faint relics of the Big Bang, the seminal explosion that created the universe and everything in it 15 billion years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | T.A. HEPPENHEIMER, Heppenheimer is a free-lance science writer living in Fountain Valley
"Many and strange are the universes that drift like bubbles in the foam upon the river of time." --Arthur C. Clarke. Our universe, physicists believe, began about 15 billion years ago in a Big Bang. This was an enormous explosion, far more violent than that of a nuclear bomb, an intense flash of energy that created the cosmos. But what existed before the Big Bang? What produced it, or caused it to occur? Today a number of investigators are giving new insights that address these questions.
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