Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCost Control
IN THE NEWS

Cost Control

BUSINESS
October 15, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Sony Pictures Entertainment plans to cut at least 300 jobs over the next 18 months, in keeping with a mandate from Tokyo-based parent Sony Corp. to slash overhead throughout the company, according to sources familiar with the expected move. The layoffs will follow the elimination of 1,000 jobs in the entertainment and electronics giant's struggling music group earlier this year.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amtrak will begin scuttling more than a fifth of its rail passenger service and firing 5,500 workers in the next two months to address a mushrooming deficit and the prospect of reduced federal subsidies. Officials said Wednesday that they would begin reducing the frequency of some routes on Feb. 1 and start eliminating others two months later. "In the past we have tried to be every place all the time," Amtrak President Thomas M. Downs said during a news conference to announce the cuts.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | JILL GOTTESMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Southeast cities that have a lot in common--including budget problems--are thinking of combining some of their services to save money. Some officials of Huntington Park, Maywood and Bell want to go even further and merge into one city, but for now most of their efforts are aimed at combining street cleaning and painting, trash pickup, tree trimming and other services. "To combine things we have separate crews for makes the most sense," said Richard Loya, a Huntington Park city councilman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
Sixty-nine dollars may not be a lot of money to some people, but it was enough to cause a flap on the City Council when Mayor Gene Beyer announced plans to return 10% of his $690 monthly salary to the city. City officials, who are facing a budget crunch, have proposed a plan in which municipal employees would be furloughed for eight hours every two weeks--effectively cutting their salaries by 10%. Beyer said council members should be willing to make the same sacrifice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what he described as the most difficult financial task the university has ever undertaken, Cal State Long Beach President Curtis L. McCray has approved a sweeping $13.2-million budget cut that will sharply reduce classes and eliminate some longstanding programs at the 34,000-student campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1990 | JIM CARLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his attempt to file for permanent U.S. residency under an amnesty law, Jordanian national Nedal Hamad said he had to wait all day to ask a question at one immigration office and stood in line for three hours to obtain a form at another. Hamad, 22, then discovered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service office on Brookhurst Avenue near his home in Garden Grove. There was no line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1992 | JON NALICK
As many as 120 weekend classes will be eliminated in the Rancho Santiago College District, part of $1.6 million in budget cuts approved by the district board to offset a shortfall caused by the state financial crisis. "Even as we have to cut back for this spring, our students will pay more," lamented board President Brian E. Conley before the unanimous vote at Monday's regular meeting. In balancing the $66.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2003 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday proposed making deep cuts to the state's workers' compensation system, going much further than recently enacted legislative reforms in an effort to bring down soaring insurance premiums and burnish California's business image. The Legislature in September took a comparative scalpel to the $29-billion system with cuts that are estimated to yield about $5 billion in annual savings.
SPORTS
November 20, 1991 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Big West-Western Athletic Conference merger of several Olympic sports is awaiting approval only from the WAC before the plan can be put into action, according to Jim Haney, Big West commissioner. WAC athletic directors met last month in Los Angeles with all but two of their counterparts from the Big West--Cal State Fullerton and Cal State Long Beach--to discuss merging several Olympic sports into what is currently being called the Big Western Conference.
SPORTS
January 28, 1991 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dropping Cal State Fullerton's football program is the only viable option for dealing with massive budget cuts, an athletics council member said Sunday, and Titan Coach Gene Murphy said he understood why the advisory board made its recommendation to university President Dr. Milton A. Gordon. "I'm not bitter, I'm just sad for a lot of people," said Murphy, who recently completed his 11th season at Fullerton. "I understand a lot of things about budgets.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|