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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013
"An Evening With Costa-Gavras" Where: Regal Cinemas 8 at L.A. Live When: 8 p.m. Monday Price: $13 Information: http://www.lafilmfest.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
With international high finance the modern era's wild west, it's not surprising Costa-Gavras - a stalwart of the politically minded thriller ("Z," "Missing") - would try to mine banking malfeasance for cinematic suspense. But "Capital," about the machinations engineered by a newly anointed French bank president (Gad Elmaleh) to avoid a takeover from an aggressive American hedge fund mastermind (Gabriel Byrne), never quite gels as either a sharp critique of take-no-prisoners commerce or a voyeuristic wallow in corporate nastiness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2013 | By Susan King
Oscar-winning writer-director Costa-Gavras, best known for his politically charged films such as 1969's "Z" and 1982's "Missing," will be making appearances this week at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre and the New Beverly Cinema. The 80-year-old filmmaker will appear Wednesday at the Aero  in Santa Monica to introduce the screening of his 2002 film "Amen.," based on Rolf Hochhuth's play "The Deputy," revolving around a German SS officer (Ulrich Tukur) who learns that a process he developed to end typhus is being used to murder Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2013 | By Susan King
Oscar-winning writer-director Costa-Gavras, best known for his politically charged films such as 1969's "Z" and 1982's "Missing," will be making appearances this week at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre and the New Beverly Cinema. The 80-year-old filmmaker will appear Wednesday at the Aero  in Santa Monica to introduce the screening of his 2002 film "Amen.," based on Rolf Hochhuth's play "The Deputy," revolving around a German SS officer (Ulrich Tukur) who learns that a process he developed to end typhus is being used to murder Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even at 80, Costa-Gavras is fighting the good fight. The Greek-born, naturalized French writer-director best known for his politically charged films such as 1969's Oscar-winning "Z" and 1982's "Missing," found himself in the middle of police action in April in Istanbul. Costa-Gavras and fellow directors Mike Newell and Jan Ole Gerster were part of a protest condemning the demolition of the historical Emek Cinema. CHEAT SHEET: L.A. Film Festival "It was very peaceful," Costa-Gavras said Friday over a coffee at a West Hollywood hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If they gave out Oscars for stirring up controversy, Costa-Gavras, the cinema's most celebrated auteur provocateur , would have a crowded trophy room. Reviled by the right, denounced by the left, the 54-year-old Greek-born French director has an unfailing knack for setting off ideological furors. Is it any wonder?
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
"This is not a controversial film," said an emphatic Tony Thomopoulos, chairman and chief executive officer of United Artists. Sounding like a man who didn't want a battle like the one over "The Last Temptation of Christ" on his hands, Thomopoulos added: "This is a very powerful, moving film. The first time I saw it I was emotionally drained. This is the kind of film that you go home and think about for a week."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though he's lived in Paris since the age of 19, Greek-born director Constantin Costa-Gavras can't escape the tragic tradition. "That's the problem with Greeks," he says in heavily accented English. "There's this extraordinary weight behind us--borne of the light, the landscape, the food, Mediterranean passions. It's a weight but also wings. It can go either way. My wings are made out of metal. They're very, very heavy." Those who have followed Costa-Gavras' 25-year career would tend to agree.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
With international high finance the modern era's wild west, it's not surprising Costa-Gavras - a stalwart of the politically minded thriller ("Z," "Missing") - would try to mine banking malfeasance for cinematic suspense. But "Capital," about the machinations engineered by a newly anointed French bank president (Gad Elmaleh) to avoid a takeover from an aggressive American hedge fund mastermind (Gabriel Byrne), never quite gels as either a sharp critique of take-no-prisoners commerce or a voyeuristic wallow in corporate nastiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
COSTA-GAVRAS is a master of politically charged cinema, with films that are often thinly disguised fictionalized versions of ripped-from-the-headline stories with a strong liberal bent. Over the last four decades, he's taken on conservative regimes in his native Greece, as well as in Uruguay and Chile. He's explored Nazi war criminals living a covert existence in America and the white separatist movement. His political activism comes easy to him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even at 80, Costa-Gavras is fighting the good fight. The Greek-born, naturalized French writer-director best known for his politically charged films such as 1969's Oscar-winning "Z" and 1982's "Missing," found himself in the middle of police action in April in Istanbul. Costa-Gavras and fellow directors Mike Newell and Jan Ole Gerster were part of a protest condemning the demolition of the historical Emek Cinema. CHEAT SHEET: L.A. Film Festival "It was very peaceful," Costa-Gavras said Friday over a coffee at a West Hollywood hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013
"An Evening With Costa-Gavras" Where: Regal Cinemas 8 at L.A. Live When: 8 p.m. Monday Price: $13 Information: http://www.lafilmfest.com
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
"Only God Forgives," Nicolas Winding Refn's follow-up to "Drive", will have its North American premiere at the Los Angeles Film Festival next month. Starring Ryan Gosling as an American expat living in Bangkok, Thailand, the film joins the critically acclaimed "Fruitvale Station" as one of two Gala screenings for the festival, which runs June 13-23 at L.A. Live's Regal Cinemas downtown. "The Way, Way Back," a comedy starring Steve Carell, Toni Collette and Sam Rockwell, will close the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | Associated Press
Greece's new Acropolis Museum said Tuesday that it would restore references to early Christians vandalizing the ancient Parthenon temple, which were deleted from a film shown to visitors for fear of angering the country's powerful Orthodox Church. The decision last month to delete the short segment angered the film's creator, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Costa-Gavras, and was criticized in the Greek press as an act of censorship. The controversy came just over a month after the opening of the new museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Susan King
In the late 1960s, Costa-Gavras couldn't persuade any French producer or distributor to make his political thriller "Z," which went on to win the Oscar for the best foreign language film of 1969. "It was an unusual movie," says the 76-year-old filmmaker, born in Greece as Konstantinos Gavras. "There was no love story and there were several characters going through it. It was difficult to explain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
COSTA-GAVRAS is a master of politically charged cinema, with films that are often thinly disguised fictionalized versions of ripped-from-the-headline stories with a strong liberal bent. Over the last four decades, he's taken on conservative regimes in his native Greece, as well as in Uruguay and Chile. He's explored Nazi war criminals living a covert existence in America and the white separatist movement. His political activism comes easy to him.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Susan King
In the late 1960s, Costa-Gavras couldn't persuade any French producer or distributor to make his political thriller "Z," which went on to win the Oscar for the best foreign language film of 1969. "It was an unusual movie," says the 76-year-old filmmaker, born in Greece as Konstantinos Gavras. "There was no love story and there were several characters going through it. It was difficult to explain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | Associated Press
Greece's new Acropolis Museum said Tuesday that it would restore references to early Christians vandalizing the ancient Parthenon temple, which were deleted from a film shown to visitors for fear of angering the country's powerful Orthodox Church. The decision last month to delete the short segment angered the film's creator, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Costa-Gavras, and was criticized in the Greek press as an act of censorship. The controversy came just over a month after the opening of the new museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Amen.," Costa-Gavras' highest-profile film in years, is steeped in the tradition of the director's landmark film "Z" and his subsequent political thrillers, which combine suspense with jolting expose. In this instance Costa-Gavras is covering familiar territory yet is able to evoke the horror of widespread complacency to human suffering of genocidal proportions.
NEWS
January 30, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Costa-Gavras, a young Paris-based filmmaker, returned to his native Greece to make his 1969 "Z," an expose of the military junta's ruthless seizure of power in 1966, he brought a raw documentary realism to the fast-paced thriller form with such style and urgency that the film became an international classic.
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