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Cottage Cheese

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NEWS
September 12, 1987 | Associated Press
The FBI is investigating how glass fragments wound up inside cartons of Knudsen cottage cheese manufactured here and sold in the Los Angeles area. Cartons of cottage cheese were pulled from grocers' shelves last week. The product was distributed throughout California and Nevada under the Knudsen, Foremost, Alpha Beta, Westwood, Jerseymaid and Albertson brand names.
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HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In July 2010, there was an end-of-days-type hailstorm in Calgary, and my little Acura got hammered. Now I drive a car that looks like it has cellulite. I'm cheap, and I don't need an overpriced and rapidly depreciating midlife-crisis-mobile to boost my ego; I have biceps for that. But if your biological chassis has bumps and pocks and you want them gone, you can't exactly trade in for a new model. So is there the physiological equivalent of a "dent clinic" that can make those lower-body bumps go away?
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FOOD
January 9, 1986
You've probably heard the story before--how the Arab trader who carried his milk in a pouch hanging from his camel's neck found that the heat and bumpy ride caused the formation of good-tasting, creamy curds. It was the forerunner of today's cottage cheese. The name "cottage" came from the Europeans who made this cheese in their cottages to utilize the milk remaining after the cream had been skimmed for making butter.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Enjoying that cottage cheese? We have a bit of bad news for you -- a cup of the stuff could contain roughly 1,000 milligrams of sodium, a little less than half of what you should consume in an entire day. Using three packets of ketchup on those fries? There's another 534 milligrams. Making people aware of how much sodium may be in certain foods is the idea behind a series of "Salt Shocker" videos produced by the L.A. County Department of Public Health's RENEW LA County initiative as part of their sodium awareness program.
FOOD
May 2, 1985 | KAREN GILLINGHAM
More than any other food, cottage cheese has been synonymous with dieting. Cottage cheese with pineapple, cottage cheese with tomatoes, cottage cheese with peaches, pears or apricots and cottage cheese in a cantaloupe. No wonder dieters become bored. But why not use cottage cheese as an ingredient instead of as a bland main dish to mound on a lettuce leaf and garnish with fruit?
HEALTH
July 7, 2003 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
When we were kids, my brothers and I would play a game in which we jumped on our beds to see who could knock off the most plaster from the bedroom ceiling. Like many homes built more than 50 years ago, our home had ceilings of rough plaster, or "cottage cheese." Today, many homeowners are scraping off this plaster to modernize their homes. It's difficult, messy and fatiguing.
HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In July 2010, there was an end-of-days-type hailstorm in Calgary, and my little Acura got hammered. Now I drive a car that looks like it has cellulite. I'm cheap, and I don't need an overpriced and rapidly depreciating midlife-crisis-mobile to boost my ego; I have biceps for that. But if your biological chassis has bumps and pocks and you want them gone, you can't exactly trade in for a new model. So is there the physiological equivalent of a "dent clinic" that can make those lower-body bumps go away?
FOOD
January 23, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR
You usually think of cottage cheese in a salad--not a sandwich. But mixed with a few fresh herbs and seasonings, low-fat cottage cheese makes a great high-protein topping for rye toast. I like the distinct caraway flavor of the bread with the mild cottage cheese, and there's something soothing about the warm toast and cool topping. Serve shredded carrots and alfalfa sprouts alongside. For a quick snack, keep a batch of the cheese mixture in the fridge.
NEWS
September 15, 1987
FBI agents confirmed that they are investigating several cases in the Fresno area in which glass was found in packages of Knudsen cottage cheese. Knudsen has recalled more than 600,000 pounds of cottage cheese since the first discoveries of glass fragments were reported more than a week ago in Southern California. All of the containers involved in the case are believed to have come from the Knudsen plant in Visalia.
FOOD
September 23, 1998 | DONNA DEANE, Deane is director of The Times Test Kitchen
On a recent visit to the Ojai farmers' market, I picked up several wonderful homemade jams. There were many flavors to choose from, but I ended up with apricot and raspberry. The jams brought to mind one of my favorite breakfasts. I spread whole wheat-toast (or any whole-grain bread) with nonfat cottage cheese and a dollop of homemade or good-quality jam. It makes a delicious, filling breakfast along with hot tea.
HEALTH
July 7, 2003 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
When we were kids, my brothers and I would play a game in which we jumped on our beds to see who could knock off the most plaster from the bedroom ceiling. Like many homes built more than 50 years ago, our home had ceilings of rough plaster, or "cottage cheese." Today, many homeowners are scraping off this plaster to modernize their homes. It's difficult, messy and fatiguing.
FOOD
July 31, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to beat fresh figs served with Camembert, Brie or goat cheese; the sweetness of the figs marries so well with the creaminess and saltiness of the cheese. But the calories of this summer pleasure can be more than you want to think about. That's what inspired this lighter alternative, one that makes a good appetizer on a warm evening. For this simple crostini, puree low-fat cottage cheese until light and smooth, resulting in an almost fluffy texture.
FOOD
January 23, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR
You usually think of cottage cheese in a salad--not a sandwich. But mixed with a few fresh herbs and seasonings, low-fat cottage cheese makes a great high-protein topping for rye toast. I like the distinct caraway flavor of the bread with the mild cottage cheese, and there's something soothing about the warm toast and cool topping. Serve shredded carrots and alfalfa sprouts alongside. For a quick snack, keep a batch of the cheese mixture in the fridge.
FOOD
November 21, 2001 | MARION CUNNINGHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of my favorite things to cook as the weather turns cooler is Chili Cheese Supper Dish. Relatively inexpensive, this has to be one of the most foolproof recipes to make, and it has a very satisfying taste and texture. Other than grating the cheese, the rest is simple measuring, mixing and baking. This is ideal for beginners. Serve it with warm tortillas and a simple green salad. Make a salad dressing of three parts olive oil mixed with one part white balsamic vinegar and add a pinch of salt.
FOOD
May 23, 2001 | FAYE LEVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A holiday to celebrate cheese sounds like a French idea. But it is Shavuot, the upcoming Jewish festival, that highlights dairy foods. The official purpose of the two-day holiday, which begins on Sunday evening, is to commemorate Moses receiving the Scriptures on Mount Sinai. Its unofficial raison d'etre is that on this day you're supposed to indulge in creamy delights--noodle kugels with sour cream, cheese filo pastries, cheese blintzes, and most important of all, cheesecakes.
FOOD
February 16, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
Eating right means being prepared. When hunger strikes, have on hand low-fat snacks such as this cottage cheese spread. This recipe was given to me by a Hungarian friend, Ildiko Worner. She likes to make a batch and keep it in the refrigerator. When she wants a little nibble of something, she has a bit of dip with fresh vegetable sticks or a toasted baguette slice.
FOOD
February 3, 1999
Sandra Tsing Loh, author of "Depth Takes a Holiday" and KCRW radio commentator ("The Loh Life," Tuesdays at 7 p.m.) "It's really embarrassing. I've been married for 10 years and my husband does all the cooking. He bakes bread and everything. He won't even let me slice a tomato. "So he's wrecked me in the kitchen; my cooking muscle has atrophied and fallen off. And he's been gone for a week to Costa Rica.
NEWS
July 13, 1989
A new study suggests that eating large amounts of dairy products, especially yogurt and cottage cheese, may increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer, a researcher said. A team of researchers affiliated with Harvard Medical School found for the first time that women with ovarian cancer were more likely to eat dairy products, especially yogurt and cottage cheese, compared to healthy women. Dr.
FOOD
December 8, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
Chechnya has had a bitter history, but those who've tasted Chechen food say it's delicious. Like the rest of the northern Caucasus, it has a cuisine influenced by both the Middle East--you can find familiar pastries like baklava--and Central Asia. The country slopes down from the wooded Caucasus Mountains to desert-like steppe lands, and Chechnya's neighbors to the north are sheep-herding nomads speaking Turkish and Mongolian dialects.
FOOD
September 8, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
Where does cheese get its flavor? From bacteria native to milk. In fact, all milk would taste like cheese to begin with except that it takes these bacteria weeks to do their work, and they won't do anything at refrigerator temperatures. Before they can work their magic, the milk would ordinarily be spoiled by less desirable microbes. That's why cheese makers curdle milk and press out most of the whey.
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