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Cottonwood

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1987 | MAYERENE BARKER
The beautiful Fremont cottonwood tree, with its lustrous yellow-green leaves, is a sure sign that a water source is nearby. Native to the Southwest, the tree can be found in wet soils along streams in the San Gabriel and Santa Monica mountains surrounding inland valleys in the Los Angeles Basin. It is a frequent companion to sycamores, willows and alders. The Fremont cottonwood (Populous Fremontii) was named after its discoverer, Gen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials at Joshua Tree National Park announced Thursday that the park reopened in time for what is typically its busiest season. The park was one of 401 national parks and monuments nationwide that were being opened after the budget deal to end the federal government shutdown. "We are excited and happy to be back at work and welcome visitors," Joshua Tree Supt. Mark Butler said in a statement. All park visitor centers -- Joshua Tree, Oasis, Black Rock and Cottonwood -- were opened by noon Thursday, officials said.
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NATIONAL
February 16, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Fredda Stevenson sized up the despondent young man who'd slunk into her remote watering hole on U.S. Highway 50. He was thirsting for beer and, as Stevenson learned, advice. His new bride, he grumbled, had blown all their cash on slot machines in Reno. Then they'd sped east through 100 miles of sagebrush and hills as dark and lumpy as mud pies. They camped down the road from Stevenson's bar, near a large cottonwood tree that had inexplicably thrived in Nevada's badlands. The couple started quarreling.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Fredda Stevenson sized up the despondent young man who'd slunk into her remote watering hole on U.S. Highway 50. He was thirsting for beer and, as Stevenson learned, advice. His new bride, he grumbled, had blown all their cash on slot machines in Reno. Then they'd sped east through 100 miles of sagebrush and hills as dark and lumpy as mud pies. They camped down the road from Stevenson's bar, near a large cottonwood tree that had inexplicably thrived in Nevada's badlands. The couple started quarreling.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2005
Hank Homburg, of Orcutt, Calif., was on his way home from a family snowboarding trip in February when some severe clouds moved in. About 10 miles south of Bishop, Calif., on Highway 395, he shot this picture of a cottonwood tree aglow against the darkening sky, using a Kodak Digital EasyShare DX 6490. "It happened to be right before a storm was starting and the clouds were amazing," said Homburg, a Santa Barbara firefighter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials at Joshua Tree National Park announced Thursday that the park reopened in time for what is typically its busiest season. The park was one of 401 national parks and monuments nationwide that were being opened after the budget deal to end the federal government shutdown. "We are excited and happy to be back at work and welcome visitors," Joshua Tree Supt. Mark Butler said in a statement. All park visitor centers -- Joshua Tree, Oasis, Black Rock and Cottonwood -- were opened by noon Thursday, officials said.
NEWS
June 2, 2002
Re "Cypress OKs Seizure of Church Land," May 29: Bravo to the Cypress City Council for not being bullied into a decision that would have hurt the citizens of Cypress. Cottonwood Christian Center bought the land at Walker Street and Katella Avenue knowing it was zoned for a shopping center. But the church leadership decided to ignore the law and, instead, tried to bully the city into letting it build a gigantic church. From recent events in the Roman Catholic Church, we know that just because you hold a Bible in your hand doesn't mean you are a decent and honest person.
TRAVEL
July 19, 1992 | GEOFFREY O'GARA, O'Gara is a free-lance writer based in Lander, Wyo., and a contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler magazine.
We live in a contradictory age, when city slickers pay a fortune to become weekend buckaroos herding cattle in the Wyoming outback, yet disdain red meat at the dinner table in favor of some pale bottom-trash fish with a sprig of parsley in its mouth. I'm sorry, Hopalong, but this won't do. If you seek the authentic western experience you had better be prepared to sink your canines into a serious chunk of bovine.
OPINION
July 28, 2002
Re "At Issue Is Separation of Cottonwood and Cypress," Letters, July 21: Here's the point we'd like to stress. Please don't just consider the tax dollars. Please consider the people affected by this church and its ministry. Cottonwood Christian Center needs to build its facility to continue making the impact that it does. We trust the final decision will preserve the civil rights of this church and be for the maximum benefit of those many lives around the world touched by the church.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
Re "The Real Issue Is Revenue," Aug. 11: We have lived in Cypress since 1975 and want to publicly thank our outstanding City Council for having the fortitude to fight off the zealous Cottonwood Christian Center. It is not a waste of taxpayer money to continue this fight, because our council is striving to keep Cypress financially secure. That's why we elected them. Every day we read stories of how lower-court rulings are overturned. It seems that the judges at the low end of the spectrum make rulings contrary to the law and higher-up courts correct their mistakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arborists are examining the strength of a cottonwood tree in a city park after a man was killed by a falling limb. Roger Langbehn, 53, of Carmichael was at a picnic table in Miller Park on Saturday when a 10-inch-diameter branch snapped and fell 50 feet, hitting him in the head. George Connor, an arborist, said cottonwood trees are known for shedding large branches. Saturday's strong winds, which had gusts near 30 mph, may have contributed, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2006 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
Thomas B. Turner Jr. had cherished motorcycles since he was so little that his dad had to remove the seat from a miniYamaha so his son's legs could reach the foot pegs. More than a decade after his father died, Turner, a 31-year-old Army sergeant, had taken his father's Harley from the West Coast to the Kentucky base where he was stationed. Turner was to return this month from his second stint in Iraq, and his mother told friends that he planned to hop on the bike first thing.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2005
Hank Homburg, of Orcutt, Calif., was on his way home from a family snowboarding trip in February when some severe clouds moved in. About 10 miles south of Bishop, Calif., on Highway 395, he shot this picture of a cottonwood tree aglow against the darkening sky, using a Kodak Digital EasyShare DX 6490. "It happened to be right before a storm was starting and the clouds were amazing," said Homburg, a Santa Barbara firefighter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
Members of Cottonwood Christian Center broke ground Saturday for their new church in Cypress, ending a five-year saga that made national headlines and made the church a symbol of religious rights. "We are ecstatic that we are able to move forward and put our efforts into actually building our new home and not having to fight any more," said the Rev. Mike Wilson, a Cottonwood pastor.
NEWS
July 6, 2004 | David Lukas
POPULUS FREMONTII In a single day, one Fremont cottonwood drinks more water than a huge saguaro cactus would need for several lifetimes. Stark evidence of this thirst can be found in small desert creeks that flow only at night after the trees have gone to sleep. During the summer, cottonwoods release blizzards of seeds that must find water or perish. Carried on small white tufts, these seeds drift into flooding creeks that push them onto moist sandbars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2004 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
After months of negotiations culminating in what appeared to be a workable compromise, Cypress announced Tuesday that it had reached an impasse with neighboring Los Alamitos on an agreement to move a church and build its first superstore. Cypress' news release blames the stall on Los Alamitos' "refusal" to allow balance on traffic issues. At stake is the proposed construction of a Costco store at -- and relocation of the Cottonwood Christian Center to -- sites off Katella Avenue in Cypress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2004 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
A plan that began 12 years ago to relocate a church and give Cypress its first superstore encountered another potential delay this week when neighboring Los Alamitos filed a lawsuit targeting the project's traffic implications. "Traffic circulation will be a great problem," Los Alamitos City Councilman Ronald Bates said regarding the proposed construction of a 150,000-square-foot Costco and the Cottonwood Christian Center at separate sites off Katella Avenue.
NEWS
March 9, 2004 | Michael Koehn
Under Cottonwoods Stephen Grace The Lyons Press, $19.95 * Inspired by the author's experience of using outdoor activities as a therapeutic tool for the disabled, this novel follows the adventures of Walter and Mike, a couple of guys operating on the physical and emotional fringe, who discover the restorative powers of mountains and rivers in the American West.
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