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HEALTH
April 5, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: My insurance company refused the blood pressure drug my doctor prescribed ( Hyzaar) and had me take lisinopril instead. After one month, I got a cough you wouldn't believe. Despite three trips to the doctor, prescriptions for antibiotics, bottles of cough syrup and bags of cough drops, nothing helped. Thinking I had TB or cancer, I got a chest X-ray and was ready to see a specialist. Then the nurse suggested my symptoms might be caused by lisinopril. I was changed to Benicar and am slowly getting over the cough.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
Long Beach health officials are warning residents of a sharp increase in whooping cough cases in the city. Health officials say 42 cases have been reported since January. Although officials did not immediately have a breakdown for the cases reported in the same period last year, they said 15 cases were reported for all of 2013. Four cases were reported in 2012.  This year, most of the infected have been school-age children, officials said, adding that no deaths have been reported.
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NEWS
April 17, 1999 | Associated Press
When a juror coughed, defendant Alan Rashid had a right to feel sick. The cough came just as the jury foreman announced a "not guilty" verdict in Rashid's trial on a charge of threatening homicide. The cough coincided with "not," so Judge Michael Gibbon only heard "guilty," and Rashid was sentenced to two years in prison. As the jury left the court Thursday, one inquisitive member of the panel asked an usher why Rashid was going to jail after being found innocent.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The state of California issued an advisory on measles last week. Though only about a dozen cases have been reported so far, many more people have been exposed to the virus. In the Bay Area, thousands were warned to watch for signs of the disease after a man who'd been infected on a trip to Asia rode a BART train. In Los Angeles, far more people than necessary were exposed to measles because doctors failed to report two patients' cases immediately. One had traveled to Asia; the other had been exposed to a recently infected traveler.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Just five weeks ago, Ronnie Moore could not do what most people take for granted -- cough to clear his lungs. Now Moore, a quadriplegic, coughs by pressing a button on a control box on his wheelchair. Moore's cough was the first performed electronically by a quadriplegic, said his doctor, Anthony F. DiMarco of Cleveland's MetroHealth Medical Center. Not being able to cough made Moore susceptible to respiratory infections such as pneumonia.
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The state of California issued an advisory on measles last week. Though only about a dozen cases have been reported so far, many more people have been exposed to the virus. In the Bay Area, thousands were warned to watch for signs of the disease after a man who'd been infected on a trip to Asia rode a BART train. In Los Angeles, far more people than necessary were exposed to measles because doctors failed to report two patients' cases immediately. One had traveled to Asia; the other had been exposed to a recently infected traveler.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2012
HOUSTON - Former President George H.W. Bush will spend Christmas in a Houston hospital after developing a fever and weakness following a monthlong, bronchitis-like cough, his spokesman said Monday. A hospital spokesman had said the 88-year-old ex-president would be released in time to spend the holiday at home, but that changed after Bush developed a fever. "He's had a few setbacks. Late last week, he had a few low-energy days followed by a low-grade fever," said Jim McGrath, Bush's spokesman.
OPINION
July 18, 2011 | By David Ropeik
What does society do when one person's behavior puts the greater community at risk? We make them stop. We pass laws, or impose economic rules or find some other way to discourage individual behaviors that threaten the greater common good. You don't get to drive drunk. You don't get to smoke in public places. You don't even get to leave your house if you catch some particularly infectious disease. Then what should we do about people who decline vaccination for themselves or their children and put the public at risk by fueling the resurgence of nearly eradicated diseases?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996
I know it's a little late, but I finally read your editorial, "Report on County's Landfills Offers Solid Base for Planning" (Jan 28), and I'm appalled that you never mentioned the No. 1 way to reduce the size and number of landfills--recycling. Out of a normal week's worth of garbage, recycling cut my household refuse from one garbage can to barely one-eighth of a can. If our recycling programs were vigorously pursued, we could do the same to the size and number of landfills. How dare you advocate burning waste (cough, cough)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995
After attending the "Otello" performance at the Music Center, it was clear something must be done to combat the outrageous coughing disruptions by this audience. The delicate and sensitive opening scene of Act IV was ruined by an outbreak of lung-wrenching, unstifled hacking from all quarters of the crowd that reverberated throughout the hall, often drowning the sounds from the stage. One wondered why June Anderson didn't simply step out of character and provide a moment or two for those insensitive clods to cough and get it out of their systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Confirmed influenza deaths of Californians under the age of 65 reached 202 this week, state health officials said, with 26 deaths confirmed in Los Angeles County. Speaking with reporters Friday, California Department of Public Health communicable disease control chief Dr. James Watt also reported the death of an infant in Riverside County from pertussis. The child's death marks the first whooping cough fatality since 2010, the last time the disease peaked in the state. That year, more than 9,100 cases of pertussis were reported in California, with 10 deaths.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Children who did not get vaccinated against whopping cough are one of the causes of the 2010 outbreak of the illness, when more cases were reported than in any year since 1947, researchers say. Researchers who looked at the geography of the cases suggest that clusters of “nonmedical exemptions” to immunizations were one of several factors in the California outbreak. They reported their findings Monday in the journal Pediatrics. In California in 2010, there were 9,120 cases of the illness that's also called pertussis - one-third of all the U.S. cases.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you want to be among the first to buy and use Samsung's Galaxy Gear smartwatch, you better prepare to pay up to a $1,000. Samsung unveiled the Galaxy Gear earlier this week, and it seems to be more advanced than any other smartwatch we've ever seen. The Galaxy Gear has a touch screen, can be used to make voice calls, run apps and shoot photos and videos. And Samsung claims its battery lasts a full day on one charge. But like most smartwatches, the Galaxy Gear needs to be connected to a smartphone in order to work, and in the Galaxy Gear's case it has to be connected to the Galaxy Note 3. PHOTOS: 10 things you need to know about the Galaxy Gear Samsung plans to make the Galaxy Gear functional with some of its other devices later on. But for now, it appears that when the Galaxy Gear launches in October, the Galaxy Note 3 will be the only device it can connect to. So essentially, you'll have to buy both.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
The powerful narcotic popped up on the cultural grid around the turn of the millennium. A Texas producer-remixer named DJ Screw paid homage to its woozy, heavy-lidded high by dramatically slowing down beats and vocals to replicate the drug's sleepwalker euphoria. Among Southern rappers, the chemical mixture - called "sizzurp" on the street - soon became as ubiquitous as gold jewelry. This wasn't some exotic new hallucinogen. In fact, it was usually mixed with fruit soda and sipped from oversized plastic foam cups.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2012
HOUSTON - Former President George H.W. Bush will spend Christmas in a Houston hospital after developing a fever and weakness following a monthlong, bronchitis-like cough, his spokesman said Monday. A hospital spokesman had said the 88-year-old ex-president would be released in time to spend the holiday at home, but that changed after Bush developed a fever. "He's had a few setbacks. Late last week, he had a few low-energy days followed by a low-grade fever," said Jim McGrath, Bush's spokesman.
SPORTS
September 29, 2012 | By Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times
USC cornerback Brian Baucham is feeling better since his release from the hospital this week, but he continues to suffer bouts of coughing and headaches, a person familiar with the situation said Friday. Baucham, a fifth-year senior from Torrance, was hospitalized after playing in USC's 27-9 victory over California last Saturday at the Coliseum. He was on a ventilator for two days before he was taken off the device Monday. He was released Wednesday, said the person, who asked that they not be identified because of the sensitivity of the situation.
SPORTS
March 20, 1993
So the Dodgers have decided to ban smoking from the stadium. Management says it was done for the health and well-being of its fans. Didn't the Dodgers remember that they play a cough away from downtown? The same downtown that is hidden during those heavy smoggy summer days? And don't forget the San Gabriel Mountains that sometimes disappear during afternoon games. Now we can all feel grateful for the Dodgers for preventing people from lighting up while we cough during those Stage 3 smog alerts.
OPINION
April 6, 2004
Banning sales of cough remedies to minors may not exactly help with the abuse of these substances (April 4). It may actually promote the use because it presents a new challenge. The situation would become like cannabis or even beer, where it is illegal but still is available through multiple options but at higher prices through "dealers." This would just present an array of new problems for the already-burdened police. Wei Wong Los Angeles
NATIONAL
July 20, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
With the nation's attention focused on dire news about whooping cough, parents' inclination may be to hustle their children -- or themselves -- in for a booster shot. Will there be a run on the whooping cough vaccine? If there is, doctors should be able to handle the demand. The supply of whooping cough -- or pertussis -- vaccines is fine, according to a spokesman with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. "The CDC is not aware of any supply issues as far as vaccines that protect against pertussis," said Thomas Skinner in an email to the Los Angeles Times on Friday morning.
SCIENCE
July 19, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The United States is on track to have the highest number of whooping cough cases since 1959, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Already, there have been nearly 18,000 cases of the disease, formally known as pertussis, reported nationwide this year, more than twice as many as at this point in 2011, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. There have been nine deaths so far, all of them in infants. In 2010, there were more than 27,000 cases and 27 deaths, 25 of them in infants.
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