Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCouncil Of Economic Advisers
IN THE NEWS

Council Of Economic Advisers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan intends to nominate Michael Mussa, a professor of international business at the University of Chicago, to be a member of the Council of Economic Advisers, the White House announced Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 11, 2012 | By Eric J. Weiner
There is a growing student protest movement against orthodox economics that could change the field as we know it. If it is sustained, historians likely will cite Nov. 2, 2011, as the start of the revolution. On that day at Harvard University, roughly 70 students organized a walkout of an introductory economics class taught by N. Gregory Mankiw. Mankiw is the former head of the Council of Economic Advisers for President George W. Bushand an advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987
As expected, the White House announced that Beryl W. Sprinkel will remain as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers through next year at the request of President Reagan. He will be given cabinet rank, becoming the first CEA chairman to receive that status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Beryl W. Sprinkel Economic advisor to Reagan Beryl W. Sprinkel, 85, who served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers during the Reagan administration and who helped guide the administration's response to the October 1987 stock market crash, died Aug. 22 at a nursing home in Beecher, Ill. He had Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare neuromuscular disease. Sprinkel, protege of conservative economics guru Milton Friedman, taught economics at the University of Chicago and was executive vice president and economic advisor at the Harris Trust and Savings Bank in Chicago for nearly 30 years.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bush Nominees Grilled on Economic Policies: Susan Phillips, nominee for a vacancy on the Federal Reserve Board, told a Senate panel highly critical of the President's economic policies that she would be willing to consider further interest rate cuts to stimulate the economy. Phillips and two nominees for the Council of Economic Advisers, David Bradford and Paul Wonnacott, were questioned by Democratic members of the Senate Banking Committee. Chairman Don Riegle (D-Mich.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanford University economics professor Joseph E. Stiglitz has been named to the Council of Economic Advisers, his family said Sunday. Stiglitz's wife, Jane Hannaway, said her husband spoke with President Clinton last week, and was en route to Washington on Sunday night. Stiglitz, 50, widely known as an economic theorist, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | Reuters
Alan Blinder, a 47-year-old economics professor at Princeton University, will be a member of the Council of Economic Advisers, a published report says. President-elect Bill Clinton offered the seat and Blinder accepted, the New York Times reported in today's editions. Blinder's appointment is likely to be announced this week. He will serve under Laura D'Andrea Tyson, a Stanford University economist appointed earlier as head of the council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Beryl W. Sprinkel Economic advisor to Reagan Beryl W. Sprinkel, 85, who served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers during the Reagan administration and who helped guide the administration's response to the October 1987 stock market crash, died Aug. 22 at a nursing home in Beecher, Ill. He had Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare neuromuscular disease. Sprinkel, protege of conservative economics guru Milton Friedman, taught economics at the University of Chicago and was executive vice president and economic advisor at the Harris Trust and Savings Bank in Chicago for nearly 30 years.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1987 | BARRY BOSWORTH, Barry Bosworth is a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington. He served in the Jimmy Carter Administration as director of the Council on Wage and Price Stability.
The Council of Economic Advisers has fallen on hard times. Its public standing was recently highlighted by the response to the announced resignation of its latest chairman, Beryl W. Sprinkel. Who, many wondered, is Beryl Sprinkel? In recent years, the council and its chairman have ceased to play a major role, public or private, in the development of economic policy.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what White House officials fear is a Republican attack on Clinton Administration economic policies, a House panel voted Tuesday to eliminate the small but highly visible office that provides economic advice to the President. The House Appropriations Committee fought off a bid by Democrats to save the Council of Economic Advisers, and is expected to give final approval today to a spending measure that eliminates the council's proposed $3.4-million budget for next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn on Wednesday convened a Council of Economic Advisors to help draft a strategy for boosting business and creating jobs. The 19-member panel includes biotech entrepreneur Alfred Mann, Milken Institute CEO Michael Milken, Los Angeles Dodgers executive Jamie McCourt and L.A. Kings executive Tim Leiweke, as well as the presidents of Kaiser Permanente of Southern California, Cushman & Wakefield and City National Bank.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday completed the politically sensitive task of picking his Cabinet for the second term with selections that included one surprise--Transportation Secretary Federico Pena was nominated to serve as Energy secretary. In addition, the president named Andrew Cuomo, son of former New York Gov. Mario M.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pressing on with the delicate business of naming his Cabinet, President Clinton today is expected to nominate White House aide Alexis Herman to serve as Labor secretary and appoint Janet L. Yellen, a member of the Federal Reserve Board and a former UC Berkeley professor, as chairwoman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, sources said late Thursday.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what White House officials fear is a Republican attack on Clinton Administration economic policies, a House panel voted Tuesday to eliminate the small but highly visible office that provides economic advice to the President. The House Appropriations Committee fought off a bid by Democrats to save the Council of Economic Advisers, and is expected to give final approval today to a spending measure that eliminates the council's proposed $3.4-million budget for next year.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week after President Clinton issued a politically cautious budget that left it to Congress to rein in costly programs, Clinton's chief economic adviser gave a forceful response to the conservative GOP tide, which has been largely absent from White House rhetoric since the November elections. In the annual Economic Report of the President issued Monday, Laura D'Andrea Tyson, who chairs the White House Council of Economic Advisers, took on the Republican agenda.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1994 | JAMES RISEN
There is a great scene in the movie "Patton" that seems relevant today in the budding trade conflict between the United States and Japan. Early in the film, George C. Scott, playing Gen. George S. Patton Jr., triumphantly surveys the North African battlefield on which his U.S. troops have just wrecked the Afrika Korps of Germany's military genius, Field Marshal Irwin Rommel. "Rommel!" Patton shouts, "I read your book!" Know your adversary. That's one of the oldest rules of combat.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pressing on with the delicate business of naming his Cabinet, President Clinton today is expected to nominate White House aide Alexis Herman to serve as Labor secretary and appoint Janet L. Yellen, a member of the Federal Reserve Board and a former UC Berkeley professor, as chairwoman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, sources said late Thursday.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Tuesday that his "primary economic goal" over the next 2 1/2 years will be to keep the economy growing as rapidly as possible without rekindling inflation so the nation can grow out of its budget deficit and improve its living standard. In his annual economic message to Congress, Bush dismissed suggestions that America is due for a recession soon simply because economic expansion has continued for so long.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House driver steers a clunky, blue Chrysler into the hotel driveway and looks around for his Very Important Passenger. Three people hop in the car. "Which one is Dr. Tyson?" he asks two guys in suits and ties--barely glancing at the soft-spoken woman in a salmon-colored blazer and black skirt. Oops. Laura D'Andrea Tyson--scholarly maverick and, if such a thing exists in Washington, unpretentious soul--does not say a word.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Alice Rivlin stepped up to the podium last December to accept her appointment as deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget, the television cameras saw nothing but the thicket of microphones that towered over the diminutive economist's head.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|