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Council Of Institutional Investors

BUSINESS
April 10, 2004 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
A rule's a rule, for saints and sinners alike. That's why Institutional Shareholder Services, which advises big investors such as pension funds on corporate governance issues, says it is urging Coca-Cola Co. shareholders to withhold their votes from billionaire investor Warren E. Buffett for reelection to Coke's board of directors. The issue comes to a vote at the Coca-Cola annual shareholders meeting April 21 in Wilmington, Del. Buffett, who owns 8.
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NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - For months, the Obama campaign has been pounding Mitt Romney for his offshore holdings and his investments in companies that send jobs overseas. So when the subject came up during Tuesday's debate, Romney was eager to call out the president for doing the same thing. “Let me give you some advice - look at your pension,” Romney told Obama. “You also have investments in Chinese companies … You also have investments through a Caymans trust, all right?” Romney was correct, but it's difficult to draw comparisons between the two politicians' retirement accounts.
NEWS
February 11, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
After Enron, the accounting and securities industries are in the same uncomfortable position as the airlines after Sept. 11. To reassure fliers wary of the skies after the terrorist hijackings, the airline industry had to accept a long list of federal safety regulations it had long grounded. Likewise, to lure back investors fearful of more Enron-like accounting scandals, the investment industries may now have to accept new federal investor protections they have long blocked.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1997 | SHARON WALSH, WASHINGTON POST
When Philadelphia lawyers sued directors of Archer-Daniels-Midland Co. last year for their role in a huge price-fixing scandal, they said they were striking a blow for the company's shareholders. ADM settled the suit recently for $8 million. But guess who gets the money? Not the shareholders, but the lawyers. "It's a classic case of lawyer greed," said Mark C. Hansen, an attorney for institutional shareholders protesting the settlement.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof and E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writers
Two groups representing union pension funds turned their sights on Countrywide Financial Corp.'s directors Thursday, saying board members failed to curb what they called excessive compensation for Chairman and Chief Executive Angelo Mozilo.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1985 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Financier Carl Icahn said Thursday that if shareholders join him in rejecting a refinancing plan for Phillips Petroleum Co. next week, he will attempt to have the company sold to an employee group or another bidder "at a fair price" after first unseating the board of directors. "I'm not going away under any conditions," he said, adding that he would hold his stock--currently 7.5 million shares, or 4.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2002 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group may be best known for its "passive," index-style investing, but the mutual fund giant said it would begin taking a more activist role in corporate governance: The firm has revamped the standards it will follow in proxy voting, putting companies on notice about key governance issues.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2006 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
When KB Home Chief Executive Bruce Karatz retired last week amid a stock option controversy, he agreed to give up $13 million in disputed stock gains. But that doesn't mean he will leave the company empty-handed. Karatz is walking away with as much as $175 million in severance pay, pension benefits and stock options, regulatory filings show.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They stocked away big stashes of cash for the proverbial rainy day, exceeded profit projections and cut costs. Now these same companies find themselves sitting ducks for takeover artists and other suitors. As Wall Street continues to digest last week's surprise bid for Chrysler Corp., many companies once praised as prudently run are now considered attractive takeover targets.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2007 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission Monday said it would not intervene in a dispute over board election rules at Hewlett-Packard Co. and signaled that a clear policy governing director nomination contests probably would not be implemented until the 2008 season of corporate meetings. The announcement underscored the difficulties faced by the SEC and its chairman, Christopher Cox, in achieving consensus on a plan to give shareholders a greater voice in the corporate election process.
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