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Councilwoman Joy Picus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1993
In an 11th-hour demonstration that she just "doesn't get it," Councilwoman Joy Picus hosted a fund-raiser with her longtime friend and now big shot, U.S. Sen. Diane Feinstein, in Studio City. ("Feinstein Goes to Bat for Her Ally Picus in a Pinch," Times Valley Edition, April 15). Apparently the 3rd City Council District is a great place to collect your taxpayer-funded paycheck, and an OK place to live, but not the kind of place where you would want to invite your political back-room buddies to breakfast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1993
The uncomplimentary comment about Councilwoman Joy Picus by Marlene Adler Marks ("The Valley Joins Los Angeles," Commentary, June 11) is unfortunate and unfair. Joy Picus served the Third District with distinction and devotion for 16 years, longer than any of her predecessors. She enjoyed the confidence of her constituents because she was accessible and responsive to their needs. She failed in her bid for a fifth term because of the winds of change that are currently sweeping the country.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1992
"It's private property . . . As I understand the free enterprise system of this country, people have a right to develop their land." Hal Bernson, explaining the Warner Ridge settlement? Not exactly. These were the words of Councilwoman Joy Picus, explaining to angry Encino-area residents attending a 1987 community meeting the decision to allow George Moss to develop a commercial complex in the Sepulveda Basin. Picus had previously opposed the project, but five months after her successful 1985 reelection, during which she received substantial contributions from both Moss and his lobbyist, she voted with the council for approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993
The Rumor Mill sponsored by Councilwoman Joy Picus (April 7) is a good idea, but when police officers are called to investigate why black men are going to a public establishment, Smart and Final, that's where I draw the line. What is suspicious about black men going to this public place? Smart and Final did not call to report concern. Would the police come if two vans of white men arrived at the highly populated black and brown area of Los Angeles where there is a Smart and Final located on Crenshaw Boulevard?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1993
I would like to commend Police Officer Stephanie Tisdale of the West Valley Police Station for organizing a large group of Neighborhood Watch block captains and other good citizens who are sick and tired of seeing the ever-increasing amount of graffiti in our once clean West Valley. She is to be commended for donating much of her personal time to this effort. Because of the cooperation of Councilwoman Joy Picus and staff and many business people in the area who furnished paint, rollers and other supplies, a fairly large group turned out on Saturday, March 20, and drove to specifically assigned areas and removed this offensive stuff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993
The Rumor Mill sponsored by Councilwoman Joy Picus (April 7) is a good idea, but when police officers are called to investigate why black men are going to a public establishment, Smart and Final, that's where I draw the line. What is suspicious about black men going to this public place? Smart and Final did not call to report concern. Would the police come if two vans of white men arrived at the highly populated black and brown area of Los Angeles where there is a Smart and Final located on Crenshaw Boulevard?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1987
I thought the article in the Valley section Feb. 5 regarding development in the Sepulveda Basin grossly misrepresented the role of Councilwoman Joy Picus. There is only so much a council member can do to limit development if a proposed project meets with zoning and land-use requirements. As a matter of fact, to arbitrarily try to prevent a legal development will only allow the developer to go to court, and then who knows how large a project they could then build? Joy Picus is one of a handful of council members we can depend on to hold the line on runaway development, and fight to protect our open space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1987
Benjamin Zycher's attempt to portray the West Hills controversy in economic terms is fascinating. Economists usually deal in theory; elected officials deal with reality. When Zychers says Councilwoman Joy Picus "has decided to abide by a poll of constituents . . . displaying yet again her abhorrence of leadership," he displays an unfortunate lack of understanding of today's political environment. Elected officials who make arbitrary and unilateral decisions are not leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously and without discussion extended for six months an ordinance requiring developers of buildings in bustling Warner Center to reduce the traffic that their projects add to streets. Councilwoman Joy Picus, whose district includes Warner Center, won approval of the measure in March, 1988. It requires builders to pay an unspecified fee that will finance street widenings, shuttle buses and other traffic improvements in Warner Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992
Does John Schwada ("Warner Ridge Land-Use Case," Feb. 3) have a problem with all women, or is his viciousness just directed toward Councilwoman Joy Picus? I particularly object to his use of the words schoolmarmish and Mary Poppins to describe a female with many years of public service. Using these sexual stereotypes is a mean way to belittle a professional woman, and he says nothing to substantiate their use. Actually, the rest of the article reveals her to be a tough representative, dedicated to her constituents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1993
In an 11th-hour demonstration that she just "doesn't get it," Councilwoman Joy Picus hosted a fund-raiser with her longtime friend and now big shot, U.S. Sen. Diane Feinstein, in Studio City. ("Feinstein Goes to Bat for Her Ally Picus in a Pinch," Times Valley Edition, April 15). Apparently the 3rd City Council District is a great place to collect your taxpayer-funded paycheck, and an OK place to live, but not the kind of place where you would want to invite your political back-room buddies to breakfast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1993
I would like to commend Police Officer Stephanie Tisdale of the West Valley Police Station for organizing a large group of Neighborhood Watch block captains and other good citizens who are sick and tired of seeing the ever-increasing amount of graffiti in our once clean West Valley. She is to be commended for donating much of her personal time to this effort. Because of the cooperation of Councilwoman Joy Picus and staff and many business people in the area who furnished paint, rollers and other supplies, a fairly large group turned out on Saturday, March 20, and drove to specifically assigned areas and removed this offensive stuff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of homes around Hamlin Street in Woodland Hills used to smile and wave when Southern Pacific engineers sounded the horn as their train thundered along the tracks through the neighborhood each day. These days, however, residents of the area are bleary-eyed, ill-tempered, and about ready to tie railroad executives to the tracks when the big train, whistle blowing, rolls through, because now it often comes in the wee hours, sometimes between 3 and 5 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved forming separate panels to recommend ways to prevent drownings in city flood-control channels and to evacuate motorists from the Sepulveda Basin area during high water. Citing the drowning death of 15-year-old Adam Paul Bischoff last Wednesday, Councilwoman Joy Picus, who authored the measures, said the city must develop a systematic approach for rescuing people from flooded areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992
Does John Schwada ("Warner Ridge Land-Use Case," Feb. 3) have a problem with all women, or is his viciousness just directed toward Councilwoman Joy Picus? I particularly object to his use of the words schoolmarmish and Mary Poppins to describe a female with many years of public service. Using these sexual stereotypes is a mean way to belittle a professional woman, and he says nothing to substantiate their use. Actually, the rest of the article reveals her to be a tough representative, dedicated to her constituents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1992
"It's private property . . . As I understand the free enterprise system of this country, people have a right to develop their land." Hal Bernson, explaining the Warner Ridge settlement? Not exactly. These were the words of Councilwoman Joy Picus, explaining to angry Encino-area residents attending a 1987 community meeting the decision to allow George Moss to develop a commercial complex in the Sepulveda Basin. Picus had previously opposed the project, but five months after her successful 1985 reelection, during which she received substantial contributions from both Moss and his lobbyist, she voted with the council for approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1986
Councilwoman Joy Picus' article (Editorial Pages, March 11), "Gramm-Rudman Will Pick Local Pockets," is but another plea to allow local politicians to pick your pockets first. It is "newspeak" of a cardinal nature and is insulting to the populace which is aware (as Picus should be) as any Econmics 101 student that the amount of money returned for benefits is in inverse proportion to the distance the money must travel. If her concern for mass transit, sewage, etc., is of such concern to her, let her propose local funding and cease abdicating the responsibilities she so eagerly campaigned for. The public can then voice their opinion the next time she runs for election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge has ordered the city of Los Angeles to drop its appeal of a damaging appellate court decision in the Warner Ridge litigation, a move that has angered and confused homeowner leaders. In a closed-door session Tuesday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge R. William Schoettler orally issued the order, telling the city that its appeal to the California Supreme Court was fundamentally at odds with the city's decision to settle the Warner Ridge lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Planning authorities predict that the legacy of the contentious Warner Ridge legal dispute will be to shift the balance of power on development issues at City Hall in favor of builders. And, homeowners, lawmakers and developers agree, the repercussions on how land-use decisions are made will affect the fortunes and lifestyles of thousands of people citywide because the legal principles involved went beyond the singular conflict of Warner Ridge, a vacant 21.5-acre parcel in Woodland Hills.
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