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Counterculture

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Stew Albert, a co-founder of the Youth International Party, the mischievous countercultural organization whose members were known as the Yippies, died of liver cancer Monday in Portland, Ore. He was 66. A Brooklyn native who wound up in Berkeley in the mad '60s, Albert helped launch the Yippies in 1967 with Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Paul Krassner and others. The group was best known for its highly theatrical pranks, such as running a pig for president in 1968.
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NEWS
May 3, 1989 | ROBERT CHOW, Times Staff Writer
Adorned with African masks, preserved rattlesnake hides, totem poles, gargoyles and wood-carved monkeys--not a framed certificate in sight--the law office of J. Tony Serra looks more like an occult curio shop. Likewise, the man himself--with his gold-capped front tooth, steel-gray hair flowing past his shoulders and super-wide tie from a previous decade--has a distinctly unlawyerly presence, which is just fine with him. "I don't chum with lawyers. Most lawyers I don't respect.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're not Harleys. And that suits enthusiasts like Brea Olinda High junior Ryan Parker who, as he says, "wouldn't get caught riding one of those things." A member of the latest generation of Vespa and Lambretta scooter riders, the 17-year-old favors the style of the Italian-made motorbikes. The Piaggio-designed Vespa hit the streets in 1936, with a pressed, one-piece metal frame hailed as a technical breakthrough at the time.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From its humble beginnings as a cozily cluttered counterculture bookstore in the 1960s to its more yuppified reincarnation in the 1990s, Fahrenheit 451 Books has been as much a part of Laguna Beach as art galleries and volleyball.
OPINION
January 28, 1996 | BURT COHEN, Burt Cohen is assistant Democratic leader of the New Hampshire state Senate
Pat Buchanan and Abbie Hoffman are both right. The two radicals would concur that it isn't just politics: At the heart of political conflict in mid-'90s America is a wide cultural chasm. At the 1992 Republican convention, Buchanan conjured up "a cultural war . . . a war for the soul of America." Twenty-five years earlier, Hoffman wrote optimistically of a "Woodstock Nation," a new culture affirming community and freedom. Thus far, we've heard only one side in today's culture debate.
AUTOS
December 28, 2005 | DAN NEIL
IN its search for fresh, edgy attitude that will resonate with Generation iPod, Chevy has turned, inevitably, to the Truman administration. The styling of the HHR -- it stands for "Heritage High Roof" -- is inspired, so they tell me, by the 1949 Chevy Suburban. One must be particular in these matters, since Plymouth and Dodge built Suburbans in those years too.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a child, Rodney Cook created perfect cities--idealized megalopolises made of construction paper and Scotch tape. They were wondrous things, sprawling, meticulously scaled models with lights, subways and water systems that he built in his grandmother's basement. Some were based on real places, but his favorite model is borrowed from the world's great cities. He grafted buildings and plazas from Paris, Rome, Athens and Chicago onto a grid patterned after the graceful layout of Savannah, Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it a counter-counterculture encounter. That may explain what happened to a roadside landmark that for years symbolized Los Angeles' most eclectic community. A giant peace sign that changed colors with the seasons and with the mood of its owner has disappeared from an oak-covered hillside above Topanga Canyon's main road. Somebody would not give this peace piece a chance. And quite a few mountain folks are fighting mad about it.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
In England, where he lives, Richard Branson is only a little less known than Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Prince Charles. At 36, he reigns as founder, chairman and majority owner of a multinational entertainment conglomerate called Virgin Group Ltd., which operates a major record label, a film company, a transatlantic airline, a chain of 100 record stores, six movie studios, a handful of popular nightclubs, a travel agency and a luxury retreat on its own Caribbean island.
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