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Counterculture

NEWS
July 24, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It didn't matter what guys collected--comic books, pinup photos, stamps, Zippo lighters. They all had that same look, as if they couldn't fit into the real world, so they had to find some acceptable subculture where they could fit in." Stephen Randall, "The Other Side of Mulholland" You could spot the cars from blocks away, and the people, too. The cars were loud, low-slung and lean. The drivers had big bellies and big beards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wayne Muller's "Sabbath" should contain a warning label: This book will change your life. It can happen two ways. One, you can take Muller's advice and observe the Sabbath, which he defines as a time of rest that people of all faiths should observe. You can experience the joy of "time off the wheel, time when we take our hand from the plow and let God and the earth care for things, while we drink, if only for a few moments, from the fountain of rest and delight."
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't trust anyone over 30. That was the student revolutionary's refrain around the time a few dozen longhaired malcontents seized an abandoned Copenhagen military fortress in 1971 and proclaimed the free state of Christiania. But as Europe's most famous counterculture commune turns the Big 3-0 this summer, many among the now 700-plus residents admit that they have traded idealism and principle for heat and indoor plumbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2000 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES SENIOR FASHION WRITER
Our democracy offers many delightful freedoms, not least of which is the freedom to risk life and liberty in the pursuit of Gucci loafers. The Democratic National Convention visitors can put shopping high on their party's agenda. Herewith, we offer a Bill of Shopping Rights and Lefts, a guide that will make consuming L.A.'s material goods speedy and less of a trial. Rightist shoppers may prefer the shopping streets of Southern California that celebrate capitalism in its glory.
NEWS
July 31, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An alternative convention that promises to be anything but conventional got off to a raucous start Sunday when Sen. John McCain was interrupted by boos and hisses for departing from talk of campaign finance reform to underline his endorsement of George W. Bush.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We've lived with it for so long, it's difficult to say when the reversal began. When Coca-Cola sent a replica of Ken Kesey's party bus on the road to promote Fruitopia? When the Gap decided that a bored sneer was the ultimate American look? When Joe Camel first donned a zoot suit and shades to hang with his jazz-scribbling, joe-swilling buddies?
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | MARY JO KOCHAKIAN, HARTFORD COURANT
We all want to know what's going on in those other houses, particularly if the occupants go against type. Today, our case is a mother, Gail, and her kids--Moon Unit, Dweezil, Ahmet and Diva. The father was Frank Zappa, rest his soul. On a recent "Politically Incorrect," smirky Bill Maher had as guests Gail and Ahmet Zappa and Paul Kantner (of Jefferson Starship) and daughter China Kantner. The premise was that the Zappas and the Kantners represented atypical, countercultural families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1999 | Steve Chawkins
With Lucy in the Sky, there are no real surprises. It is entirely predictable that when you bring your kid in for a haircut, Lucy will quote to you from the works of Wavy Gravy--poet, clown, Woodstock emcee, patron saint of aging hippies the world round. "You know what Wavy says," says Lucy, reciting slowly for full sing-song effect: 'If you don't have a sense of humor, then . . . it . . . just . . . isn't . . . funny.' " Lucy in the Sky--a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When '60s Icons Collide": That could be the pitch for "The Limey." Terence Stamp and Peter Fonda star in the new thriller, which cleverly cashes in on their screen personas by incorporating old film footage and oblique references to both stars' cinematic pasts--Stamp a '60s British cult fave ("Billy Budd") and Fonda, a '60s American counterculture hero ("Easy Rider"). In "The Limey," Stamp plays a character named Wilson, a tough British ex-con who comes to L.A. on a mission of revenge.
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