Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCounties
IN THE NEWS

Counties

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
Orange County has loosened requirements for carrying concealed weapons in public following a pro-gun ruling last week by a federal appeals court, officials said Thursday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2 to 1 that California counties may no longer require residents who want to carry concealed firearms to demonstrate special, individualized needs for protection. The court majority said law-abiding residents have a 2nd Amendment right to bear a gun in public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Almost as soon as Matthew Hoff turned 18 and aged out of the mental health programs he'd been enrolled in since childhood, he was out on the streets and in and out of jail. His parents tried to get him back into treatment for bipolar and other brain disorders he suffers, but the young man wasn't cooperative and he wasn't considered dangerous or gravely disabled. So they stood by helplessly as their son faded from their reach. Less than a year later, Hoff walked into a Buena Park bank with a robbery note and left with a handful of cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014
Anthony Wardlaw was fresh out of foster care three years ago when he went on general relief, Los Angeles County's $221-a-month welfare program for the destitute. When he tried to use the money to buy his mother a hamburger, his government debit card didn't work. And he had no idea why. According to a $7.9-million settlement agreement announced Tuesday, Wardlaw was one of thousands of people who were knocked off the welfare rolls without proper notice when applications swelled during the Great Recession.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Ryan Menezes
Sixteen-year-old Monica buried her face in a pillow, trying to rest for school the next day, as the clock ticked past 11 p.m. Sleep was a battle in the tiny apartment. Hunched at the other end of the family's only mattress, two of her brothers played a video game while a third lounged next to her, watching virtual soccer players skitter on screen. Her 2-year-old niece toddled barefoot near the door, toying with a pile of pennies. In all, seven people live in this wedge of space in Historic South-Central, including Monica's mother and the mother of the little girl - the longtime girlfriend of one of her brothers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Lee Romney
YREKA, Calif. - Farmers, ranchers and onetime loggers were among those who packed a church community room here in August to listen to a former state lawmaker convey his vision of a cleaved - and more governable - California. The theme was familiar, the resonance deep for those convinced that relentless regulation is strangling the economy of this northern border county. But this time, a tall man sporting a baseball cap stood up with a challenge. "Are we just going to go have an ice cream and complain?"
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Alana Semuels
Unemployment in eight counties in California has topped 20%, according to figures released by the state Wednesday. Joblessness in California has hit a peak -- 12.5% in January -- the highest rates have been since the government began tracking unemployment numbers in 1976. Here are the eight counties in the state where unemployment is more than 20%. (Numbers are not seasonally adjusted. Colusa : 27.4% Imperial : 27.3% Merced: 21.7% Plumas : 22.3% San Benito: 21.1% Sutter: 21% Trinity: 25.8% Yuba: 20.4%
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Modoc County, in remote northeastern California, has voted to join neighboring Siskiyou County in its bid to withdraw from the state and team with southern Oregon counterparts to go it alone. Tuesday's 4-0 vote by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors - with one supervisor absent - to explore the pursuit of a state of Jefferson came just weeks after Siskiyou County supervisors voted 4-1 on a resolution to back secession. Modoc's board chairman, Geri Byrne, told the Redding Record-Searchlight that she placed the measure on the agenda “because I heard from a number of people in my district that wanted to do such.… We're not saying we're seceding today, we're saying let's look into it.” “This is going to have to be something the people bring forward,” Byrne said.
OPINION
December 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Much of California's foster care system is private, a result in part of a prevailing political philosophy in the 1980s that the private nonprofit sector could provide better service with better results at a lower cost than government. Over the years, counties referred more of the highest-need children to foster homes selected by and affiliated with private foster care agencies because, it was believed, those homes could provide a more intense level of care and oversight than traditional foster homes, which are individually licensed by the state and contracted directly by counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2013 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has thrown its weight behind Laura's Law - which allows counties to create court-ordered outpatient mental health treatment for the severely ill who have cycled through hospitals or jails and refused voluntary care - saying in a resolution that such programs have been shown to "significantly reduce" homelessness, hospitalization and arrest. The resolution, authored by Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, directs the county's chief executive and legislative advocates to get behind five new state bills that would make it easier for counties to create such programs and secure "mental health treatment for those who refuse to get help on their own. " The back story: State lawmakers passed Laura's Law, patterned after New York state's Kendra's Law but which came with no funding, in 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I've been feeling out of sorts lately - cranky, anxious, insecure - and not sure what to blame. My youngest daughter thinks Mercury might still be in retrograde. Her sister blames the recent swarm of earthquakes for my angst. And my eldest daughter suggests it's my advancing age; older people have more trouble adapting to daylight savings time, she says. They want me to figure it out soon so I can stop moping around. That's why last week's invitation for spiritual healing at a wolf preserve sounded like something I needed.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | David Lazarus
If you've eaten from a food truck or cart in Los Angeles County, chew on this: About 40% of the roughly 3,200 food trucks and carts cooking up meals in the area have never been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have been checked out only once a year, even though official guidelines call for at least two annual field inspections. How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Reginald Clarke is someone Obamacare was designed to help. The 55-year-old, who was homeless for a time, now has an apartment in Gardena and a street-cleaning job that pays him $14,000 a year. He hadn't visited a doctor in four or five years. Then, last fall, his girlfriend told him he would be eligible for Medi-Cal starting Jan. 1. "I was excited. I could go get a physical," he said. "There are a few things I need. " But joy turned to exasperation when Clarke's application, filed in December, was mistakenly rejected - and then seemed to disappear from county and state computer systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Scott Gold
A tribe is preparing to invest more than $100 million in an expansion and upgrade of its Vegas-style casino in the Santa Ynez Valley, tripling the size of its hotel and opening the door to negotiations that could lead to a greater footprint in California's $7-billion Indian gambling industry. But word of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians' expansion plan has ratcheted up tension and distrust between the Native Americans and some of their neighbors in Santa Barbara County. "It's huge - a huge expansion," said Robert F. Field, a local resident.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Ted Mullen, who was a successful high school football coach for 18 years at Villa Park, Irvine University, Santa Ana Foothill and Anaheim, died on Friday morning. He was 81. He won two Southern Section titles and was inducted into the Southern Section Hall of Fame in 2013. Mullen is survived by his daughter, Jodi. Funeral arrangements are pending. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
TRAVEL
April 4, 2014 | By Marc Stirdivant
Buellton, 25 miles north of Santa Barbara, has been known for just one thing: split pea soup. For years, Buellton was that midday rest stop on the way to points north where you lunched at Pea Soup Andersen's. No longer in the shadow of trendier neighbors Solvang and Los Olivos, Buellton has taken on a life of its own. It's a fun place to stay, explore, eat and drink - and I'm not just referring to wine. The bed Buellton has at least one remarkable place to spend the night, the Flying Flags RV park (180 Avenue of Flags; [805]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown has promised to be blunt when tackling the state's problems, and he had a straightforward message for county officials on Wednesday. "Give me $300 million and we'll call it a day," he said. Brown is trying to reduce the amount of money the state sends to counties to fund healthcare for uninsured and poor Californians. He says the counties won't need the funds because more people will be covered by the state and private insurance under the federal healthcare overhaul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
A Huntington Beach man is expected to serve two years in jail after admitting to using his truck to rip ATMs containing thousands of dollars in cash from stores across Los Angeles and Orange counties. Richard Allen Clements, 50, pleaded guilty in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Monday to one count of grand theft. Ten days earlier, Clements pleaded guilty in Orange County Superior Court to three counts of grand theft and three of felony vandalism related to ATM thefts in that county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Turning the Cecil Hotel into homeless housing was supposed to be a quick and innovative way to get skid row residents off the streets. But a proposal for hundreds of homeless units in the hotel collapsed recently in the face of opposition from downtown business leaders and social service providers, backed by Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina. They argued the neighborhood is oversaturated with homeless housing and other services. "Supervisor Molina's strong opinion is that the skid row area is the way it is because of an over-concentration of services," Roxane Marquez, Molina's press deputy, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
She was driven to a dark road in the desert in the back of patrol car. The sheriff's deputy parked in a secluded spot in Palmdale and told her to walk to the front of the car. It was there, the woman said Friday in court, that the L.A. County deputy raped her and changed her life forever. "You essentially murdered a part of me and I'll never be able to get it back," the victim tearfully said as she stared at her attacker, Jose Rigoberto Sanchez. "A police officer is supposed to serve and protect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|