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WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - The Organization of American States said Friday that countries should consider decriminalizing drug use, a shift backed by several Latin American leaders but opposed by the United States. Decriminalization could be one of many “transitional methods” in a public health strategy that could include “drug courts, substantive reduction in sentences and rehabilitation,” according to a report released by the OAS on the possible liberalization of drug polices. The report, presented by OAS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza in Bogota, was commissioned during the April 2012 Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia, in response to many leaders' complaints that U.S.-driven drug prohibition policies of recent decades had failed to stem the illicit drug business.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Mark Gevisser
In South Africa today, as the country celebrates the 20th anniversary of its democracy and prepares for elections, two deeply flawed folk heroes - one venal, the other violent - have commandeered the headlines. The president, Jacob Zuma, was recently found by the Public Protector, an independent constitutional body, to have misappropriated $20 million to upgrade his private home. And Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee who awed the world with his speed running on prosthetic legs, is being tried for murder in the killing of his girlfriend.
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WORLD
July 5, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
NSA leaker Edward Snowden has sent out appeals for asylum to six more countries, WikiLeaks reported Friday, in a sign of the marooned fugitive's mounting desperation in the face of international indifference to his plight. Snowden remains trapped in a diplomatic no-man's land at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, lacking documents that would allow him to enter Russia or travel to a country willing to damage relations with Washington to give him refuge. The 30-year-old former contract worker for the National Security Agency has been on the run for more than a month since telling journalists about massive U.S. efforts to track telephone conversations and Internet traffic around the world.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest - the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Here is what we found at Loyola Marymount: The Seaver School of Science and Engineering at Loyola Marymount is not for the faint of academic heart. But it's where a fair share of Loyola Marymount athletes - 27 of 395 to be exact - focus their studies.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1993
Switzerland is the world's richest country in terms of per-capita income, and the United States has moved up a notch to the eighth-richest, the World Bank said in its annual atlas of global statistics. Scandinavians are among the richest people in the world, with Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Iceland all in the Top 10. Mozambique remained the world's poorest economy, with its per-capita gross national product income dropping 25% in 1992 to $60.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Shan Li
Billionaire and former tech mogul Bill Gates predicts that there will be almost no poor countries left in the world by 2035. Almost all nations will be either lower-middle income or wealthier, and most will have surpassed the 35 countries that are currently defined by the World Bank as low-income, Gates says in his annual letter for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In the letter, Gates and his wife try to dispel what they say are myths about global poverty that hinder development: Poor countries are destined to stay that way, foreign aid is not helpful and saving lives leads to overpopulation.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2012 | By Laura Hautala
Countries with public pension programs should gradually increase their retirement ages to delay withdrawals by workers who are enjoying longer life spans, according to the international policy group Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Pensions are increasingly expensive for governments partly because retirees from the huge baby boomer generation, with longer life expectancies, are starting to take their pensions. “Breaking down the barriers that stop older people from working beyond traditional retirement ages will be a necessity to ensure that our children and grandchildren can enjoy an adequate pension at the end of their working life,” OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2013 | By Don Lee
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Leaders of major emerging economies, facing slower growth and volatile financial markets, sought to present a united front ahead of the G-20 summit here. But can they make a forceful case for some action or a strong statement from the larger Group of 20 when the emerging countries themselves don't share the same level of concern? After a nearly hourlong meeting Thursday, the heads of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa -- the so-called BRICS -- stressed in a joint statement their concerns about the unintended harmful effects of policy actions taken by central banks in the developed world.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple expanded its iTunes Store to Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and nine other countries Wednesday, but  the tech giant did not include India or China in its latest expansion into Asia. The Cupertino, Calif., company announced the expansion of the digital store Wednesday, saying it will hit the new areas with more than 20 million songs, including local and international music. The other countries included in Apple's expansion are Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Macao, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Life expectancy has risen in the United States over the last 25 years, but it's not rising as fast as it once was. And, compared with other developed nations, U.S. life expectancy doesn't measure up. In a report released Tuesday by the National Research Council , experts describe U.S. life expectancy as a "poor performance" compared with many other countries given the fact that the U.S. spends far more on healthcare than any other nation....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Michael Nesmith's name is far more often associated with the Monkees than the birth of Southern California country rock. Yet the former rock sitcom star played a key part in a 1960s scene when long hair and cowboy boots all a sudden made sense together. Nesmith blended rock and country music alongside artists such as Linda Ronstadt and Gram Parsons. Much of it happened at the Troubadour, where the hybrid sound was taking shape. "Linda would come play, the Dillards, [Roger] McGuinn would come play, [David]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
The scene in the early hours of Stagecoach 2014 invites a philosophical inquiry of Socratic dimension: Which came first: the deluge of country songs about girls in Daisy Dukes, or the deluge of girls in said Daisy Dukes? Perhaps that historic first song, whichever tune it was that warrants blame for the outpouring of one-dimensional celebrations of imagined rural life that barely run skin deep, was inspired by some real-world situation. Even so, the subsequent assembly line response from the Nashville songwriting community no doubt has fueled the sea of cutoff jeans that constituted part of the official uniform of at least half the country music audience today in Indio.
FOOD
April 25, 2014 | S. Irene Virbila
The drive through the Spanish Basque country to the acclaimed grill restaurant Asador Etxebarri swings through hillsides clad in infinite shades of green, up a narrow road to the village of Axpe and its minuscule square framed by a church, a school - and Etxebarri's stone-and-timber building. Kids chase balls. Old ladies share a bench. And on the far side, muscular bicyclists catch their breath after the ride up the mountain. For Americans, grilling is practically synonymous with char.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
The "American Idol" Top 6 made like Donny and Marie Osmond, circa 1976, and went a little bit country and a little bit rock 'n' roll (the perfect fresh reference for pulling in that young demographic the show's been aiming hard for this season) on Wednesday night, though not in that order. It was a drawn-out, slackish evening that felt every bit of its two hours and more. Sections between performances were filled with noisy coach banter and appearances by the band R5 and a very sedate Grumpy Cat. The extremely non-frisky, permanently bemused feline was held by host Ryan Seacrest, kissed by contestant Caleb Johnson, imitated by Jennifer Lopez and awkwardly carried on for a final appearance by Randy Jackson, who exclaimed, "The dawg holding the cat!
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Prime Minister David Cameron is under fire for suggesting that Britain “should be more confident about our status as a Christian country.” That assertion came in a column the Tory leader wrote for the Church Times, an Anglican publication. In good Anglican fashion, Cameron was careful to add that “being more confident about our status as a Christian country does not somehow involve doing down other faiths or passing judgment on those with no faith at all.” He also confessed to being a “rather classic” member of the Church of England: “not that regular in attendance, and a bit vague on some of the more difficult parts of the faith.” The prime minister's diffidence didn't help him with his critics, who saw his “privileging” of Christianity as incompatible with contemporary multicultural Britain.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | By Jaak Treiman, Juris Bunkis and Daiva Navarrette
After Russia's recent actions in Ukraine, it's no surprise that other countries bordering Russia are wondering where they stand on Vladimir Putin's shopping list. That they are on the list is a given. Article 61 of Russia's Constitution promises that "the Russian Federation shall guarantee its citizens defense and patronage beyond its boundaries. " In other words, Russia shall protect any Russian citizen who is mistreated while outside Russia. On its face, Article 61 may seem reasonable.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The iPhone 5 will be making its way to 54 countries this month, including South Korea, China, Brazil and Russia. That number is notable because the iPhone 5 is already available in 47 countries, so by Dec. 21, Apple will have its flagship product in more than 100 countries. QUIZ: What set the Internet on fire in 2012? The iPhone 5 launched in the U.S. and other countries on Sept. 21, and already the device has helped Apple reclaim the top spot in the U.S. smartphone market.  In the U.S., the phone is available from Verizon, AT&T or Sprint.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Jen Leo
Safari, anyone? Here's your online marketplace to research and book your dream African safari. Name: SafariBookings.com What it does: Features 181 safari tours in parks and preserves in eight countries, from 89 tour operators. Consider it a CliffsNotes to African safari tours. What's hot: The parks and countries are reviewed by experts - travel writers who live and breathe Africa and have written for well-known guidebooks such as Lonely Planet, Rough Guide and more.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
When Norman Hajjar rides around the country, he rides around the country. The long distance driver has just finished an epic 24-day, 12,000-mile national tour, driving a stock Tesla S model electric automobile. Hajjar's journey began in the Pacific Northwest, traversing Washington and Oregon before crossing California from top to bottom and heading east -- to Maine, via Wyoming and South Dakota. Then he drove the Tesla south to Florida, then back north to Pennsylvania before turning west and retracing the route back to California.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Comprehensive immigration reform is probably dead for yet another year, the victim - once again - of a dysfunctional Congress that can't even reach agreement on the things it agrees on. There is nothing President Obama can do about that, although if therapy were available for political relationships, there'd be a referral waiting to be made. In the meantime, the president still has to administer immigration laws as they exist, and he reportedly is considering dropping his opposition to bond hearings for detained undocumented immigrants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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