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NEWS
December 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Denmark has more food per person than any other country, while Somalia has the least, according to a new world "food map" released by the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The map illustrates the nutritional intake in 177 countries from 1994 to 1996. After Denmark, the countries with the most food are Portugal followed by Ireland, the United States and Greece, while Eritrea, Afghanistan, Burundi and Mozambique are among the hungriest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jack LaLanne, the seemingly eternal master of health and fitness who first popularized the idea that Americans should work out and eat right to retain youthfulness and vigor, died Sunday. He was 96. LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia at his home in Morro Bay, Calif., his agent Rick Hersh said. He had undergone heart valve surgery in December 2009. FOR THE RECORD: Jack LaLanne: The obituary of fitness pioneer Jack LaLanne in the Jan. 24 LATExtra section, and a headline accompanying the article online, reported that LaLanne opened what is commonly believed to be the nation's first health club, in Oakland in 1936.
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NEWS
March 11, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For many residents of the California gold country, the abandoned ore mills and rusting mine machinery that dot the green hills are cherished icons of a storied past. The relics are part of the lure of the Sierra Nevada foothills, where the look and feel of the Gold Rush era has helped attract thousands of new residents, making it one of the state's fastest-growing regions in the last decade.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, telling Americans on Wednesday that they are safer now that Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq has been dismantled, for the second day in a row touted his efforts to bolster the U.S. economy. In a speech at a Boeing Co. plant that manufactures fighter jets, Bush remained unwilling to declare victory in Iraq, saying: "Our work is not done." Nor did he mention the ongoing search by coalition forces for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.
OPINION
October 21, 1990 | Harry Nelson and Gita Wheelis Nelson, Harry Nelson, a former Times reporter, writes on international health issues. Gita Wheelis Nelson is a health administrator in Santa Monica
When Violeta Barrios de Chamorro defeated Sandinista President Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua's elections last February, many expected her administration to waste little time in revamping one of the most celebrated of Sandinista legacies--the country's health system. The new president's party platform had even called for abolishing it. But Chamorro's new health minister says he has no intention of dismantling the system built after the ouster of dictator Anastasio Somoza in 1978.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1993 | LARRY AGRAN, Larry Agran, an attorney and former mayor of Irvine, frequently writes on urban policy and national security issues.
Although I was a declared candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination for much of 1991 and 1992, as things turned out mine was never reported as a center-stage candidacy. Nevertheless, I did manage to participate with Bill Clinton and other "major" Democratic candidates in a half dozen forums, including several regional debates televised on C-SPAN or PBS affiliates. A few million Americans heard me speak at least once. Nearly 100,000 actually voted for me.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, telling Americans on Wednesday that they are safer now that Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq has been dismantled, for the second day in a row touted his efforts to bolster the U.S. economy. In a speech at a Boeing Co. plant that manufactures fighter jets, Bush remained unwilling to declare victory in Iraq, saying: "Our work is not done." Nor did he mention the ongoing search by coalition forces for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic superpower Japan is suffering a crisis of confidence. Despite an economy that appears healthy by Western standards and aggressive government actions to promote growth, business leaders and consumers remain mired in pessimism. The latest sign of malaise came Monday when the stock market tumbled to a six-year low despite the Bank of Japan's decision to cut the discount rate on loans to banks half a percentage point to 3.25%--a month before the cut was expected.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK JEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every day, Leah Layne asks if there's a doctor in the house. The answer is nearly always the same for the health administrator who is trying to lure physicians to the Columbia Basin. She and many of her colleagues are finding it difficult to attract doctors to an area where salaries are low, equipment is older and the workload is often heavy. In her search she has reached years into the future.
NEWS
November 6, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a grueling, last-minute effort to win crucial support for the Democratic ticket, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman raced Sunday from the sun-washed canyons of the Southwest to the misty forests of the Northwest, rallying voters in the first half of a marathon two-day campaign swing. Lieberman repeated his call for an infusion of more faith in public life, echoing the religious themes that he laid out when he kicked off his campaign for vice president in August.
NEWS
November 6, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a grueling, last-minute effort to win crucial support for the Democratic ticket, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman raced Sunday from the sun-washed canyons of the Southwest to the misty forests of the Northwest, rallying voters in the first half of a marathon two-day campaign swing. Lieberman repeated his call for an infusion of more faith in public life, echoing the religious themes that he laid out when he kicked off his campaign for vice president in August.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Denmark has more food per person than any other country, while Somalia has the least, according to a new world "food map" released by the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The map illustrates the nutritional intake in 177 countries from 1994 to 1996. After Denmark, the countries with the most food are Portugal followed by Ireland, the United States and Greece, while Eritrea, Afghanistan, Burundi and Mozambique are among the hungriest.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For many residents of the California gold country, the abandoned ore mills and rusting mine machinery that dot the green hills are cherished icons of a storied past. The relics are part of the lure of the Sierra Nevada foothills, where the look and feel of the Gold Rush era has helped attract thousands of new residents, making it one of the state's fastest-growing regions in the last decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1993 | LARRY AGRAN, Larry Agran, an attorney and former mayor of Irvine, frequently writes on urban policy and national security issues.
Although I was a declared candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination for much of 1991 and 1992, as things turned out mine was never reported as a center-stage candidacy. Nevertheless, I did manage to participate with Bill Clinton and other "major" Democratic candidates in a half dozen forums, including several regional debates televised on C-SPAN or PBS affiliates. A few million Americans heard me speak at least once. Nearly 100,000 actually voted for me.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic superpower Japan is suffering a crisis of confidence. Despite an economy that appears healthy by Western standards and aggressive government actions to promote growth, business leaders and consumers remain mired in pessimism. The latest sign of malaise came Monday when the stock market tumbled to a six-year low despite the Bank of Japan's decision to cut the discount rate on loans to banks half a percentage point to 3.25%--a month before the cut was expected.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK JEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every day, Leah Layne asks if there's a doctor in the house. The answer is nearly always the same for the health administrator who is trying to lure physicians to the Columbia Basin. She and many of her colleagues are finding it difficult to attract doctors to an area where salaries are low, equipment is older and the workload is often heavy. In her search she has reached years into the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jack LaLanne, the seemingly eternal master of health and fitness who first popularized the idea that Americans should work out and eat right to retain youthfulness and vigor, died Sunday. He was 96. LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia at his home in Morro Bay, Calif., his agent Rick Hersh said. He had undergone heart valve surgery in December 2009. FOR THE RECORD: Jack LaLanne: The obituary of fitness pioneer Jack LaLanne in the Jan. 24 LATExtra section, and a headline accompanying the article online, reported that LaLanne opened what is commonly believed to be the nation's first health club, in Oakland in 1936.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992
I wish that our "fighting mad" Prez had taken a walk in the desert to talk, talk, talk with Mad Saddam about a peaceful resolution of conflict. The money, material and wasted lives, theirs and ours, could better have been spent on both countries' health needs. HYMAN H. GORDON, Los Angeles
OPINION
October 21, 1990 | Harry Nelson and Gita Wheelis Nelson, Harry Nelson, a former Times reporter, writes on international health issues. Gita Wheelis Nelson is a health administrator in Santa Monica
When Violeta Barrios de Chamorro defeated Sandinista President Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua's elections last February, many expected her administration to waste little time in revamping one of the most celebrated of Sandinista legacies--the country's health system. The new president's party platform had even called for abolishing it. But Chamorro's new health minister says he has no intention of dismantling the system built after the ouster of dictator Anastasio Somoza in 1978.
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