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BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sacre bleu! A weak euro coupled with a healthy Southern California economy helped propel the Golden State past France to rank as the world's fifth-largest economy if it were a separate nation, according to a report released this week. Figures from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. placed the 2000 gross state product at $1.33 trillion, just ahead of France at $1.28 trillion, and behind the United Kingdom at $1.42 trillion. In 1999, France ranked No.
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TRAVEL
July 9, 2006 | James Gilden, You can reach James Gilden at james.gilden@latimes.com. Travel Insider welcomes comments but can't respond individually to letters and calls. Write to Travel Insider, Los Angeles Times, 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012, or e-mail travel@latimes.com.
IF you are one of the millions of Americans heading overseas this summer, you may find confusion rather than acceptance when you try to use your credit card. And it will be up to you to set recalcitrant clerks straight. The confusion stems from mandates by governments to card issuers (including American Express, MasterCard and Visa, both credit and debit cards) in foreign countries to adopt the "smart card," also known as "chip and PIN" technology, for credit cards issued in that country.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
The United States continues to outpace other developed economies globally with one of the biggest divides between rich and poor, according to a new report. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reported that the average income of the richest 10% in developed nations is nine times that of the poorest 10%, up from five times as large in the 1980s. The difference between the highest and lowest paid is greater in the United States than in most other wealthy countries, while inequality has risen faster in others such as Sweden and Finland, the report says.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the world's farthest corners, Argentina and Australia are in. But Arab powers and former partners Egypt and Syria are out. And front-line states Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have a foot in each camp. Seven years after the Persian Gulf War, the United States this week put finishing touches on a new coalition supporting the use of military force against Iraq if Baghdad continues to block United Nations inspectors from seeking out weapons of mass destruction.
WORLD
May 10, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
U.N. members elected 47 countries to a new Human Rights Council on Tuesday, choosing several that have been criticized for their poor records but keeping off others that rights groups said were the worst offenders. Cuba, China, Russia, Pakistan, Azerbaijan and Saudi Arabia were among countries winning seats that human rights advocates say do not merit places on the council.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of countries across the globe that qualify as free has reached a record high of 75, although the total population living in freedom has fallen, a human rights organization reports. The list of "free" nations increased by 13 in 1991, largely reflecting the collapse of communism in the old Soviet Union and Eastern Europe but also because of some gains in Africa and Asia.
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States ranks among the most literate nations in the Western world, surpassed only by three Scandinavian countries, Canada and the Netherlands, according to a survey released Friday. At the same time, a high percentage of older Americans lack even rudimentary skills to read the instructions on a bottle of medicine, the study showed. Finland, Norway and Sweden--home to relatively homogeneous populations--led the pack among adults ages 26 to 65. Sweden took top honors.
NEWS
March 16, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Switzerland is the most comfortable nation in which to live, the United States is in fifth place and Mozambique and Angola are the least desirable of 130 countries surveyed by the Population Crisis Committee. The committee's report, issued here Sunday, ranked the nations according to a "human suffering index" designed to establish a relationship between rapid population growth and problems that are emerging for many fast-growing parts of the Third World.
WORLD
April 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In Afghanistan, Iraq and many other countries across the globe, most Muslims support making sharia , or Islamic law, the official law of the land, according to a sweeping survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. But sharia means different things to different Muslims, according to the study. Some supporters believe it should apply only to Muslims. Some want it used in only some kinds of cases. And many Muslims disagree on the morality of divorce, polygamy and birth control.
OPINION
December 31, 2013 | By Matthew Bunn and Fred McGoldrick
The world is rightly worried about Iran's uranium enrichment program. Iran claims this technology is for producing fuel for nuclear power plants, but it could be quickly shifted to making nuclear bomb material. Unfortunately, some in Congress, in their eagerness to stem the spread of such technologies, have introduced legislation - separate from their effort to slap further sanctions on Iran - that probably would make stopping nuclear proliferation harder, not easier. Their idea is to limit future U.S. peaceful nuclear cooperation only to countries that make a legal commitment to forgo building facilities for either uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing (the other path to nuclear bomb material)
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