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NEWS
March 16, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Switzerland is the most comfortable nation in which to live, the United States is in fifth place and Mozambique and Angola are the least desirable of 130 countries surveyed by the Population Crisis Committee. The committee's report, issued here Sunday, ranked the nations according to a "human suffering index" designed to establish a relationship between rapid population growth and problems that are emerging for many fast-growing parts of the Third World.
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NEWS
January 23, 1996 | Reuters
Israel and Tunisia agreed Monday to open diplomatic offices in each other's countries by April 15, a move hailed by the United States as a step forward in the Middle East peace process. The foreign ministers of the two countries finalized the agreement, which falls short of full diplomatic relations, at a joint meeting in the State Department with U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many ways, Mexico is to Central America what the United States is to Mexico. Workers weigh the exponentially higher wages just across the river--the Usumacinta rather than the Rio Grande--against the dangers of an illegal crossing. Wealthy parents send their children to study in prestigious universities, then worry about the foreign ideas they may bring back, if they return at all.
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | From Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi on Tuesday began his first visit to Burundi since the two countries signed a cooperation treaty in 1973.
OPINION
August 11, 2011 | By Michael O'Hanlon
Amid all the talk of gloom and doom in the United States, with the stock market's near-crash and the renewed threat of a double-dip recession, it is worth pausing to remember that the United States remains the greatest country on Earth. It is also the country with the most promising future. I make these assertions not as a matter of national pride, but as an analytical conclusion. This is not to discourage serious attention to deficit reduction, economic renewal and political reform — all of which we greatly need — or to trivialize the country's admittedly serious problems.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | Reuters
A human rights group Monday assailed the records of countries attending the Middle East peace conference here. "None of the countries attending the peace conference meet acceptable standards of behavior either toward their own people or people under their control," Andrew Whitley, executive director of Middle East Watch, told reporters.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
My husband and I just returned from Israel and Egypt, and I want to shout from the rooftops that we had been misled about the risk of visiting these countries. We never felt afraid. The visible security in both countries is quite reassuring. I encourage people to relax and not be afraid to travel. Mona Shafer Edwards Los Angeles
SCIENCE
November 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Representatives of China and 15 other countries joined NASA officials this week to consider how their countries might cooperate with U.S. plans for human exploration of the moon and Mars. The three-day Washington workshop was the first in a series of meetings sponsored by the U.S. space agency.
WORLD
December 5, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
As the financial crisis has dragged on in Greece, bloody attacks unsettle Iraq and protests simmer after the revolution in Egypt, those and other troubled countries have lagged in corruption rankings, according to a global study released Wednesday. The Transparency International rankings gauge how corrupt each country is perceived to be, based on opinions from independent institutions. The group cautions that its index does not measure corruption itself, but provides a rough measure of expert beliefs about foul play in the public sector in 176 countries.
OPINION
December 31, 2013 | By Matthew Bunn and Fred McGoldrick
The world is rightly worried about Iran's uranium enrichment program. Iran claims this technology is for producing fuel for nuclear power plants, but it could be quickly shifted to making nuclear bomb material. Unfortunately, some in Congress, in their eagerness to stem the spread of such technologies, have introduced legislation - separate from their effort to slap further sanctions on Iran - that probably would make stopping nuclear proliferation harder, not easier. Their idea is to limit future U.S. peaceful nuclear cooperation only to countries that make a legal commitment to forgo building facilities for either uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing (the other path to nuclear bomb material)
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