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October 10, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for The Times
Jimmie Dale Gilmore is walking toward the exit of the NBC-TV studio in Burbank following his appearance on "The Tonight Show" when he runs into Kevin Eubanks, the guitarist in the show's house band. Eubanks praises the singer's performance, saying that the resident musicians always enjoy listening to a guest who does "the real thing."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
The scene in the early hours of Stagecoach 2014 invites a philosophical inquiry of Socratic dimension: Which came first: the deluge of country songs about girls in Daisy Dukes, or the deluge of girls in said Daisy Dukes? Perhaps that historic first song, whichever tune it was that warrants blame for the outpouring of one-dimensional celebrations of imagined rural life that barely run skin deep, was inspired by some real-world situation. Even so, the subsequent assembly line response from the Nashville songwriting community no doubt has fueled the sea of cutoff jeans that constituted part of the official uniform of at least half the country music audience today in Indio.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 4:30 p.m. and the Mavericks are in the middle of a sound check at In Cahoots country nightclub. Sound check is the time when a band's main order of business is to be sure the stage monitors are on, that the bass drum doesn't overpower the guitars in the house sound system, and that all the microphones are plugged in.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Michael Nesmith's name is far more often associated with the Monkees than the birth of Southern California country rock. Yet the former rock sitcom star played a key part in a 1960s scene when long hair and cowboy boots all a sudden made sense together. Nesmith blended rock and country music alongside artists such as Linda Ronstadt and Gram Parsons. Much of it happened at the Troubadour, where the hybrid sound was taking shape. "Linda would come play, the Dillards, [Roger] McGuinn would come play, [David]
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer and songwriter Tompall Glaser, a member of country's “outlaw” movement of the 1970s, has died after a long illness, his nephew Louis Glaser has told the Associated Press. He was 79. An associate of Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson, Glaser never achieved the stardom accorded his fellow outlaws, but was a part of country music history for his role on the 1976 album “Wanted! The Outlaws,” which featured tracks by Glaser, Nelson, Jennings and Jessi Colter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Horsey
Female country singers are complaining that their music is being pushed off the airwaves by a new crew of young, male, “bro-country” musicians singing interchangeable songs about dirt roads, pickup trucks, girls in tiny cutoff jeans and beer, lots of beer. Carrie Underwood is leading the charge, telling Billboard magazine that the country music business seems to have very limited room for new female musicians, but that it's different for the guys. “There seem to be so many male singers out there who can be viewed as similar, and there seems to be plenty of room for all of them,” Underwood said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Band Members Eulogized: Johnny Cash, at the invitation of Reba McEntire, delivered the eulogy at a memorial service Thursday in Nashville for seven members of McEntire's country music band who were killed last weekend in a plane crash near San Diego. McEntire sat with 100 members of the victims' families, but did not participate. About 800 mourners, including many country music stars, attended the hourlong tribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
It seems fitting that one of the earliest scenes in the premiere episode of ABC's music drama series "Nashville" is set in a recording studio. An excited producer tweaks the controls on the mixing board during a session with a bratty young country-pop singer. He drops everything out of the sound mix but her voice, which is noticeably off-pitch. "Don't worry," the producer says, "we can fix that. " The singer's manager, sitting nearby on a couch reading, nonchalantly responds, "Thank God for Auto-Tune.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Aspiring artists face few challenges more daunting than escaping the shadow of a family member who has established a reputation in the same field. That goes double for Carlene Carter. The veteran singer and songwriter not only is the daughter of one of the most prominent female figures in all of country music -- June Carter -- but she's also the granddaughter of Mother Maybelle Carter, who along with her brother-in-law A.P. Carter and his wife was part of the Carter Family, a trio whose recordings and radio performances played a crucial role in bringing country music to the world nearly a century ago. Oh, and her stepfather happened to be Johnny Cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
It wasn't as if Carlene Carter was short on source material to draw on for her new album, “Carter Girl,” the first of her 37-year recording career in which she fully embraces her place in country music hiistory as the daughter of June Carter (Cash) and the granddaughter of Mother Maybelle Carter of the original Carter Family. “I made a list of every Carter Family song I knew that they had sung or I had sung when I was with them,” she said of her periodic drop-ins as a member of the Carter Sisters touring unit that included her mother and two aunts, Helen and Anita Carter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
What's Martina McBride, one of the most decorated country singers of the last 20 years, doing devoting an entire album to vintage R&B, soul and rock songs? Having a blast. That seems to be the main motivation behind "Everlasting," her just-released studio album, which was produced by Don Was and includes covers of Elvis Presley's "Suspicious Minds," Otis Redding's "I've Been Loving You Too Long," Aretha Franklin's "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man" and Jimmy Ruffin's "What Becomes of the Brokenhearted.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Broad of shoulder and booming of voice, Bob Romeo is a memorable guy with a seemingly memorable job title: chief executive of the Academy of Country Music. Based in Encino, it's one of that genre's two principal trade groups along with Nashville's Country Music Assn.; both seek to promote the style through concerts, festivals and, most visibly, televised award shows. But although they have their differences, the organizations are commonly known by acronyms - ACM and CMA - that can lead to confusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014
The morning after firebrand singer Valerie June's swing through L.A. to open for Sharon Jones at the Wiltern on Tuesday, she had a whirlwind day of activities related to promoting her acclaimed 2013 album “Pushin' Against a Stone” before hopping a plane for her next stop: three nights with Jones at the venerable Fillmore auditorium in San Francisco. As engaging as “Pushin' Against a Stone” is, it didn't fully capture the charm and energy of her live performance, which doesn't surprise the 32-year-old Jackson, Tenn., native greatly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Horsey
Female country singers are complaining that their music is being pushed off the airwaves by a new crew of young, male, “bro-country” musicians singing interchangeable songs about dirt roads, pickup trucks, girls in tiny cutoff jeans and beer, lots of beer. Carrie Underwood is leading the charge, telling Billboard magazine that the country music business seems to have very limited room for new female musicians, but that it's different for the guys. “There seem to be so many male singers out there who can be viewed as similar, and there seems to be plenty of room for all of them,” Underwood said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
What possible street cred could there be in a roots-country record sung by three New York-born, Los Angeles-reared sisters and produced by a guy who grew up in Santa Monica? Plenty, when the singers are Petra, Tanya and Rachel Haden, the triplet daughters of jazz luminary Charlie Haden, and that producer happens to be Ry Cooder. It's worth knowing that before the triplets' dad earned his stripes in the jazz world, Charlie spent many years performing country music with his family throughout the Midwest - a history he tapped in his 2008 album, "Rambling Boy," for which Tanya and Rachel were along for the musical ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan
It's a side of Mayor Eric Garcetti that few in Los Angeles have seen before. He likes to play the country tune “God Bless the U.S.A.” in his office. He wants to take his wife to a honky tonk saloon in Chatsworth for Valentine's Day. And he can't wait to see the Nashville group Lady Antebellum in concert. He might be a liberal Democrat who hails from a hip Silver Lake neighborhood. But Garcetti was in a decidedly red-state frame of mind Wednesday as he spent an hour on the radio paying tribute to country music.
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