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August 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
A guitar once owned by Mother Maybelle Carter, a member of one of country music's most influential families, has been acquired by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. The Gibson L-5 acoustic guitar had been on loan to the Nashville museum since 1998 but was reclaimed by the owner in May and listed for sale at $575,000. Philanthropist Bob McLean donated $1 million to the Hall of Fame to purchase the guitar, saying historic instruments such as Carter's guitar belong in the museum.
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December 14, 2011
Nashville's Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum has scored an early holiday gift in the form of a $10-million pledge from the Country Music Assn. that will go toward the museum's ambitious $75-million expansion campaign, officials announced Tuesday. It is the largest single gift in the nonprofit museum's history. The Hall of Fame is in the midst of efforts to more than double its size from the current 140,000-square-foot building to what is planned as a 350,000-square-foot facility that will include an 800-seat performance space that will be called the CMA Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The $37-million Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which celebrates its first anniversary this spring, devotes more than 50,000 square feet to the colorful history of country music, but nothing illustrates that story more vividly than a single sheet of Chaves County, N.M., courthouse stationery. Showcased in a crowded display case near the front of the downtown museum's exhibition area, the 1947 handwritten letter is from a promising honky-tonk singer named Lefty Frizzell to his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
After Zac Brown chose to sing "Martin," a love song to his guitar, everyone on stage with him Tuesday night at Club Nokia for this year's Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum benefit concert quickly fell in line and served up songs inspired by their own instruments. No surprise there: All musicians have a story about their first instrument. At this annual round-robin "guitar pull" session, rooted in a Nashville living-room music tradition widely credited to Johnny Cash and June Carter, the symbiotic connection between musicians and their tools is a fundamental one. That relationship is more palpable than ever since last year's flooding ravaged the country music capital and damaged or destroyed an untold number of instruments precious to those who not only earn a living with them, but who use them to express their deepest feelings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2011
Nashville's Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum has scored an early holiday gift in the form of a $10-million pledge from the Country Music Assn. that will go toward the museum's ambitious $75-million expansion campaign, officials announced Tuesday. It is the largest single gift in the nonprofit museum's history. The Hall of Fame is in the midst of efforts to more than double its size from the current 140,000-square-foot building to what is planned as a 350,000-square-foot facility that will include an 800-seat performance space that will be called the CMA Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
After Zac Brown chose to sing "Martin," a love song to his guitar, everyone on stage with him Tuesday night at Club Nokia for this year's Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum benefit concert quickly fell in line and served up songs inspired by their own instruments. No surprise there: All musicians have a story about their first instrument. At this annual round-robin "guitar pull" session, rooted in a Nashville living-room music tradition widely credited to Johnny Cash and June Carter, the symbiotic connection between musicians and their tools is a fundamental one. That relationship is more palpable than ever since last year's flooding ravaged the country music capital and damaged or destroyed an untold number of instruments precious to those who not only earn a living with them, but who use them to express their deepest feelings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2005
Hall of Fame: The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum has two new inductees: singer-songwriter Kris Kristofferson and former industry executive Jim Foglesong.
TRAVEL
May 13, 2001
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, a Nashville, Tenn., institution since the 1960s, moves to a fancy $37-million home Thursday. Spanning a downtown city block, the new building is more than twice as big as the old one several miles away, allowing the museum to display more of its million-item collection. It also offers daily live performances, interactive stations with video and music, thousands of archival objects, a 25-minute film, a restaurant and the hall of fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Johnny Cash exhibit debuts this month at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, an elaborate biographical salute to the country music legend that will remain on display through 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Associated Press
The late Texas songwriter Cindy Walker has left an unusual and generous gift to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: her catalog of about 500 songs, many of them pop and country classics. The hall said Wednesday that Walker bequeathed her share of the songs, including future royalties, after her death in 2006. The songs have since earned the institution more than $500,000 in royalties. Walker's catalog is one of the most celebrated in popular music. Bing Crosby, Roy Orbison, Ray Charles, Bob Wills, Ernest Tubb, Eddy Arnold, Willie Nelson and many more recorded Walker's songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
A guitar once owned by Mother Maybelle Carter, a member of one of country music's most influential families, has been acquired by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. The Gibson L-5 acoustic guitar had been on loan to the Nashville museum since 1998 but was reclaimed by the owner in May and listed for sale at $575,000. Philanthropist Bob McLean donated $1 million to the Hall of Fame to purchase the guitar, saying historic instruments such as Carter's guitar belong in the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The $37-million Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, which celebrates its first anniversary this spring, devotes more than 50,000 square feet to the colorful history of country music, but nothing illustrates that story more vividly than a single sheet of Chaves County, N.M., courthouse stationery. Showcased in a crowded display case near the front of the downtown museum's exhibition area, the 1947 handwritten letter is from a promising honky-tonk singer named Lefty Frizzell to his wife.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, which for 33 years has told the cultural story behind country music, closed its doors for good. A new museum will open in May that tourism officials say will be bigger, better and bolder. Last week, workers began packing up the old museum's treasures, including Elvis Presley's gold Cadillac, Dolly Parton's scribbled lyrics to "Jolene," Mother Maybelle Carter's guitar and a Patsy Cline stage costume, hand-sewn by the singer's mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Grelun Landon, 80, a veteran music industry official and longtime head of West Coast publicity for RCA Records who was an early supporter and helped develop the career of Elvis Presley, died Monday in Ojai. The cause of death was not reported. A native of Marion, Ohio, Landon graduated from USC with a major in journalism. In the 1950s, as vice president of Hill & Range Music in New York, he worked with many of the top stars of the Grand Ole Opry, including Hank Snow and Johnny Cash.
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