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Coupons

NEWS
April 8, 1990 | from United Press International
A Florida woman who gained national notoriety as "Coupon Connie" for her role in a coupon counterfeiting scheme has been sentenced by a federal judge to 27 months in prison. Connie Arvidson, 35, of Boca Raton, Fla., was sentenced Friday by U.S. District Judge Sidney Fitzwater. Arvidson, who foraged through trash bins for legitimate discount coupons before she began selling counterfeit ones, said she is innocent and plans to appeal. "I'm not going to give up. I'm a very strong person," she said.
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BUSINESS
July 25, 2009 | David Colker
Been staring at a blank TV picture since June 12, when broadcasters switched to all-digital? That's a likely sign the television is of the old analog type and can't process digital signals without a converter box. The federal government has been issuing $40 coupons that nearly offset the price of the boxes, which are available online and in many consumer electronics stores. But next week could be your last chance to get in on the discount program.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Yahoo Inc. is offering coupons or refunds to users who find songs they bought inaccessible after Sept. 30, when the company shuts its music-download service. The decision to close the Yahoo Music Store had added fuel to criticisms over copy-protection measures known as digital rights management. The firm said it was offering coupons on request for people to buy songs through Yahoo's new partner, RealNetworks Inc.'s Rhapsody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1987
A few weeks ago, I wound up in line behind one of those women you read about, who have accumulated enough coupons to pay for their entire order of groceries. It was unbelievable! Yards of tape totaling up the order, yards of tape subtracting the coupons. The cashier desperately trying to keep track of coupons, expiration dates, correct brands, correct sizes, etc., people leaving the line cursing, some abandoning their carts and leaving the store. Very few people have the time or energy to wade through the flood of coupons and rebates that pour in every week, yet we are penalized for not using them, because all product prices have been raised to cover the amount of the coupons, the handling, and the fraud.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1991 | S.J. DIAMOND
Jonathan Lazar was mad. The Santa Ana resident had collected 88 manufacturer's coupons for $1 off Ralston Purina's Bran News cereal and was ready to redeem them all at Vons, a local supermarket chain that doubled coupons. He'd save $2 on every $2.49 box. Aware of the store's policy of doubling only three coupons for like items per customer, Lazar planned, as he later explained, "to enter, exit and re-enter the store for as many three-coupon trips as necessary."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1987
I have the perfect solution for Maureen Franklin. Why not spend her precious time and energy to find a market where she can arrange to phone in her grocery order and have it delivered to her home. It will cost more, but it will eliminate her need to stand in line behind "those women" who use coupons. She can then sit down--no energy needed--and total her food bill to be sure the prices are correct. She won't need to worry about hitting the car next to her with her door; she won't need to worry about the market being unclean and cluttered (most markets are very clean--where does she shop?
BUSINESS
January 29, 1988
Vons said Thursday that it is reviving its unlimited double coupon policy after customers threatened to shop elsewhere. On Jan. 7, Vons cut in half the amount a customer can double, to 50 cents from $1, and said it was lowering its prices slightly. At the time, Vons said it would have to raise prices if it didn't change the coupon policy, which costs the chain millions of dollars a year. Stuart A.
NEWS
April 7, 1994
I've been dining out in the South Bay, and using the Entertainment Card, several nights a week for the past five years. Due to the state of the economy it's not unusual for a restaurant to close, or change ownership, before I use my coupon. But last week at "Le Petite Cafe" my Entertainment Card was refused because the owner "decided to cancel the contract" . . . a mere eight months before it expired. I suppose that in an era when .230 hitters demand renegotiation of multibillion-dollar contracts, I shouldn't be surprised, but I've gone to "Le Petite Cafe" for the last time.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Thirty percent of consumers say they won't shop without coupons and more than 80% of consumers claim to use coupons regularly. But shoppers are picky about the coupons they use. According to Procter & Gamble, only 2% of all coupons issued are redeemed. P&G believes coupons are ineffective and has cut the number of coupons it issues in half. Pillsbury Foods, a unit of Grand Metropolitan, and Campbell Soup have a different philosophy. They increased couponing in 1996--and saw sales climb.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2008
Regarding "A coupon queen reveals her strategies for saving" (Aug. 10): I have been clipping coupons for 41 years now. I trade coupons with people from across the country. I go to every online site I can to print coupons. I always check prices. I also keep track of the sales. Last year alone, I saved about $3,500. I just love hearing about how people save. Now we have to figure out how to get gas coupons and save there too. Marla Berger Huntington Beach
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