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WORLD
February 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Days after his arrest was ordered, the former president of the Maldives sought refuge Wednesday at the Indian embassy, the latest twist in a political saga that has gripped the chain of islands south of India. Mohamed Nasheed stepped down as president last year after weeks of turmoil, set off by his decision last February to arrest a judge whose rulings he claimed were politically tainted. He and his backers later said he was forced to resign by forces loyal to his country's longtime autocracy, which held sway over the Maldives until its first democratic elections roughly four and a half years ago. In August, a national commission countered that there was no coup and concluded that Nasheed had run afoul of the constitution by arresting the judge, findings that triggered new rounds of protests.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2012 | By Jessica Naziri and Nell Gram, Los Angeles Times
The Times on Tuesday released about 1,200 previously unpublished files kept by the Boy Scouts of America on volunteers and employees expelled for suspected sexual abuse. The files, which have been redacted of victims' names and other identifying information, were opened from 1985 through 1991. They can be found in a database along with two decades of files released by order of the Oregon Supreme Court in October. The database also contains summary information on about 3,200 additional files opened from 1947 to 2005 that have not been released publicly.
OPINION
October 10, 2012
The ignominious history of sexual abuse in the Boy Scouts of America - and the attempts over the years by the organization's executives to cover it up - have been sadly detailed in court cases and, most recently, in an investigation by the Los Angeles Times. But the most exhaustive chronicles of that abuse reside within the Scouts itself, which a century ago began keeping secret "Ineligible Volunteer" files on men accused of sexual abuse or other transgressions. The files were - and still are - intended as a confidential, internal registry of cases of alleged or confirmed abuse in which volunteers were expelled from the organization and were not to be reinstated.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has ended a 6-year-old class-action lawsuit against the nation's telecommunications carriers for secretly helping the National Security Agency monitor phone calls and emails coming into and out of this country. The suit was dealt a death blow in 2008 when Congress granted retroactive immunity to people or companies aiding U.S. intelligence agents. Without comment, the justices turned down appeals from civil liberties advocates who contended this mass surveillance was unconstitutional and illegal.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has ended a 6-year-old class-action lawsuit against the nation's telecommunications carriers for secretly helping the National Security Agency monitor phone calls and emails coming into and out of this country. The suit was dealt a death blow in 2008 when Congress granted a retroactive immunity to people or companies coming to the aid of U.S. intelligence agents. Without comment, the justices turned down appeals from civil liberties advocates who contended this mass surveillance was unconstitutional and illegal.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- A former senator. A scandal. A court case over campaign spending.  Not John Edwards. This time, it's former Sen. Larry Craig (R-Idaho), who's fighting the Federal Elections Commission's attempt to force him to pay back more than $200,000 in campaign funds. Craig used the funds for his legal expenses in connection with his 2007 arrest at a men's restroom.  The FEC contends the expenses were "not made in connection with his campaign for federal office or for ordinary and necessary expenses incurred in connection with his duties as a senator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
When Bill Buck accidentally cut off the tip of his finger at his Duarte cabinet workshop two years ago, he headed to Huntington Memorial Hospital's emergency room. He assumed his insurance company would sort out the $12,630 bill from the plastic surgeon, Jeannette Martello. But Martello wasn't satisfied with the $3,500 insurance reimbursement, so she returned the check and filed a lawsuit against Buck, his wife and his business for the full amount, according to the state attorney general's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Ai Weiwei lost his appeal in his high-profile tax case on Friday, prompting the artist to speak out yet again against the Chinese government. A court in Beijing upheld an approximately $2.4-million fine for tax evasion against the artist. The tax fine had been imposed against Ai's company, Beijing Fake Cultural Development. Supporters of the artist believe that the fine is an attempt by Chinese officials to penalize Ai for his online political activism and fight for free speech. Ai told reporters Friday that the Chinese legal system "still has no respect for the truth, still will never give taxpayers and citizens an ability to justify themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
TheU.S. Supreme Courtdeclined Monday to hear an appeal from the federal government over whether a highly visible, 43-foot cross can remain atop Mt. Soledad in San Diego. The issue now returns to the U.S. District Court in San Diego to decide whether the cross should be taken down or whether it can be modified to satisfy a constitutional prohibition against government endorsing a particular religion. Whatever the District Court decides is likely to be appealed, first to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and then to theU.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By David Ng
An artist in South Africa has landed in hot water over a painting depicting the country's president, Jacob Zuma, with exposed genitalia. "The Spear," a painting by Brett Murray, shows a clothed Zuma standing in a defiant pose, with his penis and scrotum clearly visible. Since there is no literal spear shown in the painting, viewers can assume that the title is a phallic reference. Zuma is launching a court case this week in which he argues that the painting violates his right to dignity, according to reports.
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