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Court Martial

NEWS
February 12, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Sgt. Maj. Gene C. McKinney's chief accuser acknowledged that she omitted from her original complaint one of her most sensational charges: that he made a raunchy come-on and promised to make her "plenty happy." McKinney, 47, the Army's former top-ranking enlisted soldier, is accused of sexually harassing, assaulting or threatening six women. Staff Sgt.
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NEWS
February 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The wife of Sgt. Maj. Gene C. McKinney testified in her husband's court-martial at Ft. Belvoir on 19 sexual-misconduct charges, expressing disbelief at accusations by six military women. "That's not my husband," Wilhelmina McKinney said when asked about allegations that McKinney committed acts ranging from indecent assault and adultery to obstructing justice. She said her husband told her of the accusations in February 1996 when they were first made public by Sgt. Maj. Brenda Hoster.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | From Reuters
A Marine pilot whose jet severed lift cables at an Italian ski resort, killing 20 people, will face a second court-martial on obstruction of justice charges, a military judge said Monday. Capt. Richard J. Ashby, 30, of Mission Viejo will stand trial on March 15 for allegedly hiding and conspiring to destroy a videotape of the tragic flight last February, a military judge said after a brief hearing at Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base in North Carolina. Ashby faces a separate court-martial Feb.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Army dropped its allegation that a female trainee lied about having sex with an instructor. The Army said the charge against Pvt. Toni Moreland wasn't a priority and officials didn't want to bring in an out-of-town witness. Moreland, 21, pleaded guilty to other minor charges at a low-level summary court-martial. She was sentenced to 16 days in prison and fined $300.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. -- A military judge on Wednesday sentenced Army Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison, ending a summer-long court-martial in which he was convicted of espionage for leaking a vast trove of classified U.S. military and diplomatic materials to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks in 2010. Army Col. Denise Lind, who delivered the sentence, found Manning guilty last month of six counts of violating the Espionage Act and mishandling classified material, but she acquitted him of a more serious charge of aiding the enemy.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2012 | This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales is expected to be charged Friday with 17 counts of murder in connection with a March 11 overnight rampage in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan. Here is a primer on the military's investigative process and the charges. Q: Who investigated Bales?  A: Each branch of the service has its own internal “police force,” and for the Army it is the Criminal Investigation Command. These Army detectives, who generally serve with the accused soldier's same command, began interviewing witnesses, collecting evidence and preparing a report about the shootings for Army prosecutors for the possible filing of charges that could lead to his military court-martial.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The captain of the U.S. submarine that collided with a Japanese fishing trawler has changed his mind on the politically sensitive issue of whether the presence of civilians on the sub contributed to the deadly crash. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, after constantly reviewing details of the Feb. 9 collision, now believes the presence of 16 civilians in the crowded control room broke the crew's concentration at a critical time, said Waddle's attorney, Charles Gittins.
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