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January 29, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals panel Wednesday upheld a ban on a California law that would reduce welfare payments for new residents who move here from other states, despite Gov. Pete Wilson's warnings that California would become a welfare magnet. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals let stand a lower court ruling that blocked California's attempt to cut public aid for new residents during their first 12 months in the state.
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NEWS
October 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court says a recent Supreme Court ruling on school prayer does not stop Alabama students from talking about religion or praying publicly at school, as long as it is voluntary. The U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta last week upheld its earlier ruling in Alabama's school prayer case, throwing out parts of a Montgomery federal judge's order that had limited religious expression by students in DeKalb County. The U.S.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | DAN MORAIN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Less than six hours before his scheduled execution this morning in the San Quentin gas chamber, murderer Robert Alton Harris won at least a temporary reprieve from a federal appeals court. After a day of legal maneuvering by attorneys for Harris and the state, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a temporary stay of execution at 6:30 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court overturned part of the federal three-strikes sentencing law Monday, saying it wrongly requires previously convicted robbers to prove convincingly that they were unarmed and did not injure their victims seriously. The 2-1 ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, in a case from Hawaii, applies only to the 1994 federal law and not to state three-strikes laws, which lack similar burden of proof provisions and are much more widely used.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court Wednesday overturned the conviction of a Woodland Hills video distributor for selling films featuring former porn queen Traci Lords when she was a minor, ruling that a federal law against distributing child pornography was unconstitutional. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2 to 1 that the 1977 law used to convict Rubin Gottesman was "fatally flawed" because it failed to require knowledge that one of the performers was under age 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which has earned a reputation for causing legal earthquakes on issues ranging from capital punishment to the Pledge of Allegiance, decided Tuesday that postponing California's Oct. 7 recall election would shake things up too much. If the election were postponed, the "enormous resources" already invested in the bid to recall Gov.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision hailed by environmentalists as a victory for the spotted owl and for open government, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that secret communications between the White House and a special committee that makes decisions on endangered species are illegal. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has reversed a controversial decision by a Los Angeles judge to expunge an Army reservist's criminal convictions so that he could accompany his unit to the Persian Gulf War. In a brief, unanimous decision made public Friday, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the decision of veteran U.S. District Judge A. Andrew Hauk to annul the criminal record of James Patrick Smith, 45. At the hearing on Aug. 24, over the vigorous objections of federal prosecutor Stephen A.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court ruled that illegal immigrants seeking to stay in the United States can't be disqualified simply because they used fake Social Security cards to work. In a 2-1 ruling issued Wednesday, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled a San Diego woman who came to the country illegally in 1968 was eligible to apply for legal residency under a 1986 amnesty, despite her conviction for using someone else's Social Security card.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contentious debate over California's term limits law flared anew Wednesday as foes and supporters squared off before a panel of federal appellate court judges who questioned them with vigor for more than an hour. The hearing at the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals focused on whether the law, created by the passage of Proposition 140 in 1990, violates the U.S. Constitution.
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