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Court Rulings

NEWS
May 27, 1998 | Reuters
In a landmark move, China's Supreme Court said Tuesday that it would accept rulings by Taiwan's civil courts to protect the rights of residents of the island, which Beijing considers a rebel province. Rulings by civil courts and arbitration by institutions in Taiwan would have the same validity as law in China after confirmation by Chinese courts.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 1985
The justices, by a 9-0 vote, upheld Georgia court rulings permitting that state to collect property taxes from banks after allowing only a limited deduction for the federal securities held by those banks. In an opinion written by Justice Harry A. Blackmun, the court said states do not have to deduct the full value of tax-exempt U.S. obligations when calculating a bank's property tax liability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1987
Some of the key court cases involving students who have been exposed to the AIDS virus and their attendance at public schools: April 11, 1986: A temporary injunction sought by high school parents in Kokomo, Ind., to bar Ryan White, a 14-year-old victim of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, from class, was refused. The student, who had been kept at home, was ordered to attend school. County Circuit Judge Jack R.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
State and federal securities law enforcers complain that they have been hamstrung in efforts to shut down so-called "boiler room" operations in Southern California because two recent appeals court rulings have created a no-man's land in the regulation of gold and other commodities they call "exotic securities." However skeptically an enterprise may be viewed by the public watchdogs, pitchmen who sell such investments over the telephone now are sheltered from the enforcers.
NEWS
April 19, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, in a strong assertion of its own final authority, ruled Tuesday that Congress cannot reopen cases that have been finally decided by the federal courts. The 7-2 ruling brings to an end several large lawsuits alleging investment fraud, which the court in 1991 said were filed too late. Upset by the court's reading of the securities law, Congress took the rather unusual step of hurriedly passing a new measure that specifically revived those lawsuits.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By sad coincidence, the Supreme Court announced the final rulings of this year's term on the day that former Chief Justice Warren E. Burger was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. But the ceremony in a sense could also have symbolized the passing of the torch to his successor, because more than ever, this was the year of the Rehnquist Court. In 1972, when then-Justice William H.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a victory for press freedom, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday that prosecutors may not compel the news media to turn over notes and other unpublished information in a criminal case. The decision overturned rulings by two lower courts that could have led to jail time for a Sacramento television news director who refused to hand over unaired footage of a murder suspect's videotaped confession.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a precedent-setting decision that a deceased man is allowed to potentially father a child, a state Court of Appeal in Los Angeles has ruled that a man had a right to bequeath his frozen sperm to his lover for impregnation. The three-judge panel ruled late Thursday that under the state probate code, William E. Kane had a property interest in his frozen sperm and could do with it what he wished.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court in Concord ruled that garbage is private, even when it has been put out near the street for collection. The 4-1 decision runs counter to rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court. The state court said its Constitution provides a stronger expectation of privacy than the U.S. Constitution. The decision came in a case in which police searched a man's trash and found wire scrapers that were coated with marijuana residue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
A state appellate court ruled Wednesday that the city of Burbank has the power to block Burbank Airport's planned expansion, giving anti-noise opponents a key victory in the long and contentious battle over a new terminal. In a serious setback for its planned 19-gate terminal, the judges ruled that the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority lacks an "exclusive and unrestricted right" to develop the terminal without approval from Burbank.
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