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Court Rulings

NEWS
March 11, 1993 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BACKGROUND: Last March, an American missionary couple, Bill and Roberta Rees, filed suit in Tokyo asking the Japanese government to recognize the citizenship rights of their adoptive son, Andrew. (View, March 31, 1992) Andrew was abandoned by his mother, who is believed to be Filipino, shortly after his birth. Japan's Justice Ministry has refused to recognize Andrew as Japanese and registered him as a stateless foreigner. The Philippine government also refused to give Andrew citizenship.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2001 | Bloomberg News
NetZero Inc. said it won a court order against Juno Online Services Inc., preventing its rival provider of free Internet access from displaying third-party ads in floating windows. The temporary restraining order, granted Friday, extends until March 15. A trial on NetZero's patent-infringement claims against Juno is set for July. NetZero last month sued Juno in U.S.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Kansas Supreme Court ruled that juveniles have a constitutional right to a jury trial, a surprise decision that could influence courts in other states and force local prosecutors to retry hundreds of open cases. In a 6-1 decision, the court based its ruling partly on a provision of the Kansas Constitution that states defendants "in all prosecutions" are guaranteed a speedy jury trial. Courts generally have said for several decades that states aren't required to have jury trials for juveniles as they are for adult defendants.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | Reuters
In a landmark move, China's Supreme Court said Tuesday that it would accept rulings by Taiwan's civil courts to protect the rights of residents of the island, which Beijing considers a rebel province. Rulings by civil courts and arbitration by institutions in Taiwan would have the same validity as law in China after confirmation by Chinese courts.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1985
The justices, by a 9-0 vote, upheld Georgia court rulings permitting that state to collect property taxes from banks after allowing only a limited deduction for the federal securities held by those banks. In an opinion written by Justice Harry A. Blackmun, the court said states do not have to deduct the full value of tax-exempt U.S. obligations when calculating a bank's property tax liability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1987
Some of the key court cases involving students who have been exposed to the AIDS virus and their attendance at public schools: April 11, 1986: A temporary injunction sought by high school parents in Kokomo, Ind., to bar Ryan White, a 14-year-old victim of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, from class, was refused. The student, who had been kept at home, was ordered to attend school. County Circuit Judge Jack R.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
State and federal securities law enforcers complain that they have been hamstrung in efforts to shut down so-called "boiler room" operations in Southern California because two recent appeals court rulings have created a no-man's land in the regulation of gold and other commodities they call "exotic securities." However skeptically an enterprise may be viewed by the public watchdogs, pitchmen who sell such investments over the telephone now are sheltered from the enforcers.
NEWS
April 19, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, in a strong assertion of its own final authority, ruled Tuesday that Congress cannot reopen cases that have been finally decided by the federal courts. The 7-2 ruling brings to an end several large lawsuits alleging investment fraud, which the court in 1991 said were filed too late. Upset by the court's reading of the securities law, Congress took the rather unusual step of hurriedly passing a new measure that specifically revived those lawsuits.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By sad coincidence, the Supreme Court announced the final rulings of this year's term on the day that former Chief Justice Warren E. Burger was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. But the ceremony in a sense could also have symbolized the passing of the torch to his successor, because more than ever, this was the year of the Rehnquist Court. In 1972, when then-Justice William H.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a victory for press freedom, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday that prosecutors may not compel the news media to turn over notes and other unpublished information in a criminal case. The decision overturned rulings by two lower courts that could have led to jail time for a Sacramento television news director who refused to hand over unaired footage of a murder suspect's videotaped confession.
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