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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye told the Legislature on Monday that the closure of budget-strapped courts has deprived more than 2 million residents of accessible justice and left the state on the verge of a "civil rights crisis. " "A one-way, three-hour trip to a courthouse can't be fair in anyone's book," Cantil-Sakauye said in her annual address to state lawmakers. California court budgets in the last several years have been cut by about $1 billion, and Cantil-Sakauye has been pleading with legislators to restore more funding next year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Laura W. Brill
Last year's Proposition 8 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court changed the lives of many same-sex couples and their families in California for the better. But the political fallout from that decision is also having a profound and worrisome effect on the state's initiative process. The reason has to do with the nature of the court's action. The Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of Proposition 8 itself. Rather, it decided an issue of standing, concluding that the initiative's backers had not been directly harmed by a lower-court ruling that the law was unconstitutional and that they therefore lacked standing to appeal that ruling.
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OPINION
November 10, 2011
Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has long lobbied for legislation that would allow the public greater access to the work of California's dependency courts, where the fates of children in foster care are decided. Twice, bills have been introduced in Sacramento to achieve that important objective, only to be stymied by well-meaning but misguided objections from child welfare advocates and self-interested protests from public employee groups whose members would face greater scrutiny.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Detailing the histories of the nation's founding fathers and belief in God, Newt Gingrich took an anti-secular message to 1,200 worshipers Sunday at the Cathedral of Praise church in Charleston, a church Rick Santorum had visited the day before. Both are courting evangelical voters as each tries to pull ahead as the clear conservative alternative to Mitt Romney in the days before South Carolina's primary. Standing on a stage with a giant screen picturing a hawk on a blue and red backdrop dotted with white stars, Gingrich pledged to defeat secularism and the “elites,” a group he referred to repeatedly in his speech.
OPINION
January 24, 2012
California government has cut and must keep cutting, even though at this point all cuts are substantive and they hurt. But there are some things that need to be protected when everything else is taking a hit. Courts have taken as much slashing as they can bear, and then some. After imposing some $350 million in cuts in the current budget year, Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed leaving the courts alone in the coming year — unless, of course, expected revenues fail to materialize. In that case, an automatic "trigger" would be pulled and courts would be in the sights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Paige St. John
California's chief justice said she was "encouraged" that the budget deal worked out between Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature would end a pattern of funding cuts for courts and restore at least some money lost previously. Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye said in a prepared statement Tuesday morning the state spending plan hammered out the day before "is an initial step forward" to rebuild "the kind of access to justice the public deserves. " It now falls to the Judicial Council and a newly created Trial Court Budget Advisory Committee to work on how that money is allocated to trial and appellate courts.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Matt Pearce, Reporting from Kansas City, Mo
The markets can't solve everything: Billionaire brothers and libertarian icons Charles and David Koch are taking to the courts to solve an ownership dispute involving the Cato Institute. The president of the institute, a longtime pillar of free-market thinking in Washington -- calls the move an attempt “to transform Cato from an independent, nonpartisan research organization into a political entity” with a “partisan agenda.” The oil-rich Kochs -  champions for the business-minded right and reviled by the left - have donated hundreds of millions to charitable causes but are better known for backing tea party groups and influencing battles over climate change and federal regulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
California courts, reeling from years of state budget cuts, are delaying hearings and trials, allowing records to sit unprocessed for months and slashing services at public windows, a judge's committee has reported. The report by the Trial Court Presiding Judges Advisory Committee was based on a survey of all presiding judges and prepared for the Judicial Council, the policy-making body for the courts. All but 10 of the state's counties responded to the survey. The survey represented the most in-depth look yet of how California courts are faring with less money and suggested that the effect of the cuts is growing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1999
Re "The Great Judicial Stall," Opinion, Sept. 5: David M. O'Brien states that the courts have been turned into an arena of ideological combat. Actually, it is the courts that have thrust themselves into the arena of political combat. They have done this by the self-expansion of their powers from Alexander Hamilton's time, when litigation issues were over who owned the cow, to today, when a single person in black routinely overturns the democratic process and thwarts the will of millions of voters or when a court reinvents the Constitution to mean whatever it thinks it should have said.
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Given the danger posed by drunk or reckless drivers, police should follow up on information - even information from an anonymous source - that a vehicle might be careening down a street or threatening other motorists and pedestrians. If they confirm that is the case, they should stop the vehicle. But that isn't what happened in a California case decided by the Supreme Court last week. The court's ruling makes it too easy for police to stop motorists on the basis of an anonymous tip. In 2008, a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road, giving rise to a concern that the driver might be drunk.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
OAKLAND -- At some point, Clippers Coach Doc Rivers told his players repeatedly this season, they were going to have to win a playoff game on the road. That time came Thursday night for the Clippers in Game 3 of the Western Conference first-round playoff series against the Golden State Warriors at Oracle Arena. The Clippers made that stand behind another monster game from Blake Griffin, DeAndre Jordan's strong all-round effort and a tremendous three-point defensive performance that pushed them to a thrilling 98-96 victory over the Warriors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
The Los Angeles Unified School District does not need to release the names of teachers in connection with their performance ratings, according to a tentative court ruling issued Thursday. A three-judge state appellate court panel tentatively found a stronger public interest in keeping the names confidential than in publicly releasing them. Disclosure would not serve the public interest in monitoring the district's performance as much as it would affect the recruitment and retention of good instructors and other issues, the ruling said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday appointed as head of California's political ethics agency a judge who has overseen the discipline of attorneys. Jodi Remke, presiding judge of the State Bar Court of California, is Brown's choice for chairwoman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission. Her appointment fills a void created six months ago when Chairwoman Ann Ravel moved to the Federal Elections Commission. Good-government activists including Robert Stern, a former general counsel for the California agency and a coauthor of the state Political Reform Act, said they knew nothing about Remke.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before analyzing the Redskins' 2014 schedule. The Skinny: Sorry we are a little late today. Had to jump on the HBO/Amazon story and make sure that was in our roundup. Other stories include recaps of Aereo's big day at the Supreme Court and Comcast and Charter are trying to work on a deal to swap and sell some cable systems. Daily Dose: The NFL will unveil its fall schedule this evening. Things to watch for will be what games CBS gets for its new Thursday package.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Even as the United States continues its historic move toward fairness and equity for gay people, antiquated anti-sodomy laws remain on the books in a dozen states. Theoretically, these laws were rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence vs. Texas, but apparently not everyone has received that message. In the Lawrence case, the court declared that state laws banning consensual same-sex relations were unconstitutional. Yet somehow, between 2011 and 2014, 12 men were arrested in East Baton Rouge Parish in Louisiana under the state's remaining anti-sodomy laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998
Re "Judge to Rule on Prosecutors' Effort to Close Medical Cannabis Center," Feb. 27. The people of California have cast their vote in favor of medical marijuana. It is the job of our government officials to carry out that ruling. I say take marijuana out of the courts. The only ones getting rich are the attorneys and the drug dealers. We waste billions of tax dollars tying up the courts and building more jails. This is the millennium. The days of "reefer madness" are as outdated and impractical as Prohibition.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Legislation approved by the Assembly would make California the first state to allow noncitizens to serve on juries. Naturally, the courts would have to make certain adjustments. ALSO: The power of jury duty Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Kenny Smith schools Chris Broussard on inclusiveness Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Victims of child pornography whose images of sexual abuse have circulated on the Internet may claim damages from every person caught with illegal images, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. But justices rejected the idea that a single person who possesses such images may be assessed the full amount due to the victim, setting aside a $3.4-million verdict against a Texas man in a favor of a woman whose childhood rape was photographed and widely circulated on the Internet.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Victims of child pornography whose images of sexual abuse have circulated on the Internet may demand compensation from every person caught downloading and possessing the illegal images, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. But justices set aside a $3.4-million restitution order handed down against a Texas man on behalf of one victim, ruling that a single defendant who possesses the pornography may not be forced to pay the full amount of damages due the victim. The 5-4 decision upholds part of the Violence Against Women Act and opens a new chapter in compensating victims who say the online circulation of their images has forced them to relive the sexual abuse they experienced as children.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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