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BUSINESS
December 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
Exxon and Texaco, two of the world's biggest oil companies, won a U.S. Tax Court case Wednesday that bars the Internal Revenue Service from claiming billions of dollars in back taxes from them. Exxon said the claim involved $2 billion in additional taxes for 1979-1981. Texaco said the IRS wanted additional taxes of $863 million for the three years, with interest on the claim of $2.5 billion as of last Dec. 31.
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NATIONAL
September 20, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A former Dallas-area car wash employee on death row for killing two co-workers after he was fired in 2000 failed to get the U.S. Supreme Court to stop his execution Thursday. Robert Wayne Harris, 40, is to die at 6 p.m., Texas corrections officials said. He originally confessed to fatally shooting five people at the Mi-T-Fine car wash in Irving. He was charged in connection with all five deaths but tried in only two. His attorney argued in two petitions to the Supreme Court that Harris should not be executed because he is mentally impaired and did not receive a fair trial.
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NATIONAL
September 15, 2011 | By David Savage, Washington Bureau
The U.S. Supreme Court stopped Texas officials Thursday evening from executing a Houston murderer who was sentenced to die after jurors were told he posed a greater danger to public safety because he is black. The justices acted on an emergency appeal after Texas Gov. Rick Perry and state judges refused to intervene. The high court's brief order said the "stay of execution of sentence of death … is granted" while the justices decide whether to review the case of Duane Edward Buck.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — A three-judge federal court threw out the Texas legislative districts drawn by the state's Republican-controlled Legislature, holding that they discriminated against Latinos and blacks and violated the Voting Rights Act. The decision, if upheld on appeal, will force Texas lawmakers to redraw the districts for Congress and the state Legislature so as to elect a greater number of minority legislators. The ruling will not affect the November elections, however. Earlier this year, federal judges in Texas drew an interim districting plan to be used this year only.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court justices waded into an election-year political dispute from Texas, signaling they favor drawing the state's 36 congressional districts based largely on the plan adopted by its Republican-controlled Legislature. The court's leading conservatives said they were skeptical of allowing judges in San Antonio to put into effect their own statewide map that creates districts geared to electing Latinos. Texas has been put "at a tremendous disadvantage," said Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, because the judges largely ignored the wishes of the Legislature.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — A three-judge federal court threw out the Texas legislative districts drawn by the state's Republican-controlled Legislature, holding that they discriminated against Latinos and blacks and violated the Voting Rights Act. The decision, if upheld on appeal, will force Texas lawmakers to redraw the districts for Congress and the state Legislature so as to elect a greater number of minority legislators. The ruling will not affect the November elections, however. Earlier this year, federal judges in Texas drew an interim districting plan to be used this year only.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A former Dallas-area car wash employee on death row for killing two co-workers after he was fired in 2000 failed to get the U.S. Supreme Court to stop his execution Thursday. Robert Wayne Harris, 40, is to die at 6 p.m., Texas corrections officials said. He originally confessed to fatally shooting five people at the Mi-T-Fine car wash in Irving. He was charged in connection with all five deaths but tried in only two. His attorney argued in two petitions to the Supreme Court that Harris should not be executed because he is mentally impaired and did not receive a fair trial.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Texas Supreme Court found "glaring disparities" between the state's rich and poor school districts and ruled Monday that funding within the nation's second-largest system is unconstitutional. Spending varies by as much as $17,000 per pupil per year from rich to poor districts, the court found. "A remedy is long overdue," Justice Oscar Mauzy's opinion said. "The Legislature must take immediate action."
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court gave an early win to Texas Republicans in the fight over redrawing election districts and the balance of power in Congress, ruling that the district lines should mostly follow those set by GOP lawmakers and not those by judges who drew new boundaries to favor Latinos. The 9-0 decision set aside a new map of congressional districts drawn by a special federal court in San Antonio that gave Latinos and Democrats a good chance to win three or possibly four new seats in the House of Representatives.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1986 | United Press International
A federal bankruptcy court judge on Friday approved a $158-million offer from Continental Airlines' parent firm, Texas Air Corp., to purchase the assets of Frontier Airlines and put its planes in the sky by Nov. 1. The court ruling gave Continental access to Frontier's fleet of between 20 and 45 Boeing 737s and McDonnell Douglas MD-80s on Saturday, said Continental spokesman Bruce Hicks. "It allows us to begin getting aircraft ready to start flying Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2012 | By Hector Becerra and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The official record says that Charles Manson and his cult followers murdered eight people during their reign of terror across Los Angeles more than 40 years ago. But for those involved in bringing members of the Manson family to justice, there has always been the lingering suspicion that their trail of death was longer. Over the years, questions have persisted about a man's apparent suicide in England, the drowning of an attorney and whether bodies are buried under the California ranches the cult called home.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- The Texas Supreme Court has ordered the Lone Star State to pay more than $2 million to a former inmate who spent 26 years in prison for murder, a ruling that could set a precedent for compensating other prisoners whose convictions are overturned.   Billy Frederick Allen, now in his 60s, was convicted of two 1983 Dallas-area murders. Unlike other inmates freed after DNA evidence proved their innocence, Allen was freed in 2009 after a court found problems with witness testimony and his trial attorneys' representation.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court gave an early win to Texas Republicans in the fight over redrawing election districts and the balance of power in Congress, ruling that the district lines should mostly follow those set by GOP lawmakers and not those by judges who drew new boundaries to favor Latinos. The 9-0 decision set aside a new map of congressional districts drawn by a special federal court in San Antonio that gave Latinos and Democrats a good chance to win three or possibly four new seats in the House of Representatives.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court justices waded into an election-year political dispute from Texas, signaling they favor drawing the state's 36 congressional districts based largely on the plan adopted by its Republican-controlled Legislature. The court's leading conservatives said they were skeptical of allowing judges in San Antonio to put into effect their own statewide map that creates districts geared to electing Latinos. Texas has been put "at a tremendous disadvantage," said Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, because the judges largely ignored the wishes of the Legislature.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2011 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Friday that he respected the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to block the execution of a Houston murderer who would be the 236th person put to death on his watch. Perry, who is seeking the Republican presidential nomination, and Texas judges had refused to grant requests for a reprieve from convicted murderer Duane Edward Buck. "Whether or not he is guilty is not in question," Perry told reporters while campaigning at a Coca-Cola bottling plant in rural western Iowa.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2011 | By David Savage, Washington Bureau
The U.S. Supreme Court stopped Texas officials Thursday evening from executing a Houston murderer who was sentenced to die after jurors were told he posed a greater danger to public safety because he is black. The justices acted on an emergency appeal after Texas Gov. Rick Perry and state judges refused to intervene. The high court's brief order said the "stay of execution of sentence of death … is granted" while the justices decide whether to review the case of Duane Edward Buck.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Wednesday refused to reconsider its earlier ruling upholding Texas' sodomy law, which forbids sexual intercourse among homosexuals. "It is not the role or authority of this federal court to decide the morality of sexual conduct for the people of the state of Texas," the court said in a five-page ruling. The court ruled in August that the state had the authority to pass such laws.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court gave a Texas death row inmate who came within an hour of being executed a new right to seek DNA evidence from the crime scene that he says could prove him innocent. The 6-3 decision opens a narrow window for prisoners to sue and obtain DNA evidence that went untested at the time of their trials. The Innocence Project in New York says 266 prisoners have been freed because of DNA evidence since 1989, including 17 inmates on death row. Though all states permit prisoners to obtain new tests of evidence under certain circumstances, prosecutors have often resisted.
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