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NEWS
March 24, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special committee of the state Judicial Council, ending a landmark three-year inquiry, reported Friday that it had found widespread sex discrimination in the California courts and proposed dozens of reforms aimed at improving the status of women in the system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court revived a lawsuit Tuesday by female prisoners who contend that the California prison system is violating their rights by refusing to hire a full-time Wiccan chaplain. A district court rejected the inmates' suit, but a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the inmates may have a valid claim. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation hires chaplains for five faiths: Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim and Native American.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | JOHN DART
The ever-expanding Promise Keepers movement of Christian men is inviting women to be full participants in its current series of spiritual rallies--as long as they are members of the clergy. Not many female pastors are expected, however, among the more than 3,600 ministers registered for the regional clergy conference Thursday at the San Diego Sports Arena. The daylong, free conference is the third of nine nationwide in which pastors are being urged to support men's ministries in their churches.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
With polls showing public support slipping away for President Bush's plan to transform Social Security, the White House is revving up efforts to win over traditionally Democratic constituencies. The latest example came Thursday, in a Spanish-language op-ed article written by Commerce Secretary Carlos M. Gutierrez, who argued that Bush's push to revamp Social Security, which includes the creation of private retirement accounts, was of "utmost importance" to Latinos.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
A pregnant patient's decision to refuse medical treatment is almost always paramount, even when survival of a fetus is at stake, the District of Columbia's highest court ruled Thursday. The decision in a widely watched case is binding only in the district, but it is expected to influence other courts wrestling with questions of maternal and fetal rights in connection with medical treatment and abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court revived a lawsuit Tuesday by female prisoners who contend that the California prison system is violating their rights by refusing to hire a full-time Wiccan chaplain. A district court rejected the inmates' suit, but a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the inmates may have a valid claim. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation hires chaplains for five faiths: Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim and Native American.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Filling the new vacancies on the state Supreme Court has proved no easy task--and it may be February or later before the three new justices to be named by Gov. George Deukmejian take their seats on the bench. The time-consuming process has allowed speculation to grow over the governor's likely nominees--and, in one instance, for ethnic group leaders to unite behind a single candidate. Asian leaders are urging the selection of Appellate Justice Harry W. Low of San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that "serious invasion of privacy issues" are at stake, a U.S. District Court judge Wednesday temporarily barred the government from forcing operators of a San Diego tuna boat fleet to carry a female observer aboard during fishing trips. Granting a request by attorneys for Caribbean Marine Services Co. Inc., Judge William Enright issued a preliminary injunction blocking deployment of a woman observer on the Mariner and seven other tuna seiners operated by the company.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Israel's Supreme Court barred a Jewish women's group Monday from chanting prayers or reading the Bible aloud at Jerusalem's Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site. Ultra-Orthodox men and women have complained about the Women of the Wall group, which prays once a month at the Western Wall, a remnant of the Second Temple that is also known as the Wailing Wall. They say that, under Jewish law, women worshipers should not be heard in the presence of men.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
With polls showing public support slipping away for President Bush's plan to transform Social Security, the White House is revving up efforts to win over traditionally Democratic constituencies. The latest example came Thursday, in a Spanish-language op-ed article written by Commerce Secretary Carlos M. Gutierrez, who argued that Bush's push to revamp Social Security, which includes the creation of private retirement accounts, was of "utmost importance" to Latinos.
WORLD
April 7, 2003 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Wrapped in a prayer shawl, holding aloft a Torah scroll, Anat Hoffman felt joyous last week as she and a group of Jewish women chanted dawn prayers in a quiet alleyway of Jerusalem's Old City to welcome in the Hebrew calendar month of Nisan. Hoffman, an Israeli-born UCLA graduate and a former member of the Jerusalem City Council, later recalled her sense of coming triumph: "I told them all, 'At the start of next month, we'll be able to pray like this at the Kotel!'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000 | DANA PARSONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neither woman wanted to serve on the jury. From the outset, the trial promised nothing but horror and sadness and a wrenching final decision that neither wanted to confront. When Joanne Reynolds heard that she would sit in judgment over Steven Abrams, who was charged with murder after driving his car into a Costa Mesa preschool playground in 1999 and killing two toddlers, she had this thought: Please, any trial but this one.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The once-bustling offices at 15 Taheri St. are eerily silent, the corridors empty of life, the computers shut down, the lights off. Gone are the young reporters who defiantly worked here for two years--through constant criticism by conservatives, frequent charges by the judiciary, occasional jailings of the editor and publisher and, finally, five renamed versions of the same paper banned over and over again. One version lasted only a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Highlighting the fragility of a case that prosecutors once planned to drop, two witnesses testified at a preliminary hearing Tuesday that they lied to police when they implicated John J.C. Stephens in the killing of a Garden Grove officer six years ago. The women--both admitted drug abusers at the time of Officer Howard E. Dallies Jr.'s murder--told a Santa Ana court that they had been high when they gave their statements to police.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ and LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A bitter legal feud for control of the home-store division of St. John Knits Inc. ended Thursday when the Irvine-based women's apparel maker settled four lawsuits with a former executive. The court battle pitted two high-profile families against each other--the Grays, who founded St. John, and the Wardys, who founded the home-store chain. The two clans were once friends and business partners but have been warring since September, when Amen Wardy Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | JOHN DART
The ever-expanding Promise Keepers movement of Christian men is inviting women to be full participants in its current series of spiritual rallies--as long as they are members of the clergy. Not many female pastors are expected, however, among the more than 3,600 ministers registered for the regional clergy conference Thursday at the San Diego Sports Arena. The daylong, free conference is the third of nine nationwide in which pastors are being urged to support men's ministries in their churches.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Together, they came to take a stand Thursday, this handful of former strangers, these women who had been singled out by stalker David Arthur Carlsberg. On the day of his sentencing in the Santa Monica courthouse, three victims of one man's obsession offered him the same exacting look with which he had menaced them at different times, on different streets, in different darkened public garages, day and night, over the years.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two aides to a one-term assemblyman from San Diego County have received $100,000 each to settle a lawsuit against the state contending they were the targets of sexual harassment and wrongful termination in 1994. The two women, Lori Arbogast and Meredith Ann Anderson, alleged that they were sexually harassed by then-Assemblyman Tom Connolly (D-Lemon Grove) and then were fired by then-Assembly Speaker Willie Brown when they filed harassment allegations with the Assembly Rules Committee.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly six weeks of wrangling, a jury of nine women and three men was selected Monday to hear the case against alleged Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski, even as a puzzling new wrinkle added mystery to the proceedings. Amid the selection of the jurors and six alternates--all identified only by number--came a decision by U.S. District Court Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. to delay the start of the trial by a week, until Jan. 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three female Costa Mesa police officers allege in a lawsuit filed Thursday against the city and police chief that they were harassed and intimidated by sexist jokes, lewd comments and fondling. The suit, filed in Orange County Superior Court, also alleges that male officers asked about the plaintiffs' sexual orientation, commented on their anatomy, asked them out on dates, used vulgar language in front of them and then retaliated against them when they complained to supervisors. Chief David L.
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