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SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
PHOENIX -- Sometime in the relatively near future, perhaps even this year, Zach Lee could take the mound for the Dodgers in a regular-season game. Or Joc Pederson could step into the batter's box. If it happens, fans at Dodger Stadium might consider raising their plastic cups in a tribute to the man responsible: Frank McCourt. If not for the team's unpopular former owner, the Dodgers' two top prospects would be somewhere else. Lee might be counting down the days until the NFL draft.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Chris Brown, who sat in jail over the weekend since his arrest after authorities revoked his probation, is expected to face a judge Monday - the same judge who on Friday ordered him held without bail, according to L.A. Now . The R&B singer was arrested at a Malibu rehab facility where the court had ordered to remain even after completing 90 days of court-ordered treatment for anger management. The 90 days came after Brown was arrested in October in Washington, D.C., on suspicion of assault while on probation related to his 2009 pre-Grammys assault against then-girlfriend Rihanna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a close-up of a telephone and a bizarre voice mail message: "Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
OPINION
March 15, 2014 | By Erwin Chemerinsky
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should retire from the Supreme Court after the completion of the current term in June. She turned 81 on Saturday and by all accounts she is healthy and physically and mentally able to continue. But only by resigning this summer can she ensure that a Democratic president will be able to choose a successor who shares her views and values. A great deal turns on who picks Ginsburg's successor. There are, for example, four likely votes to overturn Roe vs. Wade on the current court: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel A. Alito Jr. If a Republican president selects Ginsburg's replacement, that justice easily could be the fifth vote needed to allow the government to prohibit all abortions.
SPORTS
March 15, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
A boy asked for a basketball game of one on one and Stanley Johnson accepted the challenge. One dunk, two dunks, three dunks … "That's not fair. Take it easy on me. " the boy said. But Johnson wasn't going to let up. After five dunks, the game was quickly over. Never mind that Johnson's opponent was 11 and not half his size. The All-American from Santa Ana Mater Dei High was sharing a lesson he learned from his mother. Johnson's competitive spirit and drive to excel have propelled him to one of the greatest careers enjoyed by a Southland high school basketball player.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A California appeals court has sided with landowners fighting the state over test drilling for a proposed water tunnel system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. In a 2-1 decision, an appeals panel ruled Thursday that the state needed to go through the eminent domain process to gain access to private property on which it wanted to take soil samples and conduct environmental surveys. The testing is necessary for the design and construction of two 30-mile tunnels that the state proposes to build as part of a delta replumbing project.
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Until about three years ago, federal agents annually intercepted some 8,000 unaccompanied minors entering the United States illegally. By last year, the number had jumped to nearly 26,000. This year's projection: As many as 60,000 youngsters may attempt to cross into this country without parents or papers. This surge of under-age humanity presents two problems. First is understanding the forces propelling it, which experts say include narco-trafficking, Central American gang violence and abusive homes.
OPINION
March 13, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It might be sound reasoning, but a Supreme Court decision this week on an arcane legal-easement argument will likely have broad and regrettable consequences, particularly in the West, for the national movement to convert old railroad beds into bicycle paths. The case, Brandt vs. U.S., is rooted in the General Railroad Right of Way Law of 1875, through which Congress established a uniform approach to granting easements on government land so railroad companies could extend tracks through the heart of the still-developing country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Richard Winton
A day after being indicted by an Arizona grand jury, ex-NFL star Darren Sharper is scheduled to appear in a Los Angeles courtroom Thursday morning -- his latest hearing amid mounting legal troubles that extend across five states. Los Angeles prosecutors charged Sharper in February with seven rape and drug counts, alleging he drugged and assaulted two women he met at a West Hollywood club. Court documents revealed he was under investigation for similar allegations in Las Vegas, New Orleans and Tempe, Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In a big win for a little fish, a federal appeals court Thursday upheld delta smelt protections that have cut deliveries of Northern California water to the Southland and the San Joaquin Valley. A panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals concluded in a 2-1 decision that a number of environmental provisions that federal and state water contractors have disputed as ill-founded were in fact justified. In effect, the court backed pumping limits. Written by Judge Jay S. Bybee, a George W. Bush appointee, the opinion is a major blow to the agricultural and urban agencies that have spent years challenging endangered species protections that have curbed water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
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