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OPINION
August 31, 2008
Re "Tip them over and they still point north," Aug. 26 I have another theory to ponder: Did the scientists ever consider that the cows may lie down facing north because they don't want the sun in their eyes? If they did the study below the equator, would the cows be facing south? Allen Hatch Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hannah Kuchler
Like bacteria, big data are lurking in the stomachs of cows. Some farmers are using sensors and software to analyze it and predict when a cow is getting ill. Just like customers, cows do not always speak out when something is wrong. But companies can use data to predict potential risks and opportunities in cows and customers alike. The message of a new book, "Big Data @Work," by Thomas H. Davenport, a fellow of the MIT Center for Digital Business, is that companies are only beginning to understand the questions they can ask of their vast stores of data - and how to build the internal structures to make the most of it. "Big data" is a fashionable, sometimes overused term for the vast amounts of information that can now be stored because of the growth of online activity and the low cost of storage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Kate Mather
State officials are investigating the death of an Ontario dairy worker crushed while moving cattle over the weekend. Winston Perez, 28, suffered severe internal injuries after he was "crushed between a gate and the fence by the cows" about 5 a.m. Saturday at Dick Dykstra Dairy, coroner's and state officials said. The Riverside man underwent surgery at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, but died in the intensive care later that day. Cal/OSHA spokesman Peter Melton noted state officials had no record of safety violations at the dairy.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Rancho Feeding Corp., the Bay Area slaughterhouse that recalled nearly 9 million pounds of beef products last month, sold some meat that came from cows with eye cancer, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. Meat processed by Rancho Feeding was sold to thousands of retail stores, including Kroger, Food 4 Less and Wal-Mart as well as smaller meat markets that cater to Latino customers. The Rancho Feeding recall has also led to a voluntary recall by Nestle of its Philly Steak and Cheese flavored Hot Pockets after it discovered a supplier had bought meat from Rancho Feeding.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Irvine-based fast-food chain In-N-Out severed ties with a Central California slaughterhouse after learning that the facility is being investigated for potentially inhumane treatment of cows. In-N-Out executives said they cut off their supplier agreement with Central Valley Meat Co. on Sunday night, immediately after hearing accusations that animals at the plant were being shocked, shot and pulled to slaughter stations despite often being unable to stand or walk. The U.S. Department of Agriculture  shut the Hanford site Monday after viewing a video from animal rights advocacy group Compassion Over Killing.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
After a stretch of record-setting heat in late June and early July that blanketed much of the West, dairy prices could spike this summer.  Extreme heat causes cows to produce less milk, making farmers work harder to keep their Holsteins cool. The coming weeks are expected to bring prolonged heat to the Midwest, a top dairy producing region, according to meteorologists for Accuweather.com . California has also seen triple-digit temperatures recently, and this summer could bring other heat waves.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Ready for something different on your family vacation this summer? Feather Down Farms offers authentic farm stays where kids and adults can learn about farm life (yes, there are chores to do) while tent-camping at sites in Illinois, New York and Northern California. In California, Chaffin Family Orchards in the Sacramento Valley will begin accepting guests in mid-August. The farm raises grass-fed cows, lamb and goats. Its orchards produce olives, oranges, lemons, cherries, plums, figs and other produce year round - fresh fruits that guests may eat. During the stay, family members can tour fields and gardens, get up to milk the cows, learn to prepare and cook meals on an open-fire stove and even take a dip in a private mountain lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
In a meadow of knee-high grass framed by rugged granite peaks and pine forests, cattleman John Hunter urged his horse forward along a trail crossing a creek, frowning under a cowboy hat dripping rainwater. With the summer grazing season in the Eastern Sierra coming to an end, he was preparing, perhaps for the last time, to move hundreds of cows out of the high country and into the Owens Valley. The 30-mile cattle drive from the Golden Trout Wilderness down to the village of Olancha is among the oldest in the state — and a cherished family tradition.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
Like many a puzzle before it, the conundrum on Conundrum Creek will be solved by being taken apart - literally. Six cows that had wandered into a remote Colorado cabin and froze stiff will be sawed into pieces, said U.S. Forest Service spokesman Bill Kight. The pieces will then be spread throughout the surrounding forest, Kight told the Los Angeles Times. The method was designed to minimize the possibility of predators -- bears or mountain lions -- converging on a small area around the cabin and nearby hot springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994
I can't help but notice that the apologists for recombinant bovine somatotropin don't bother to address the issue of desirability or necessity. There is, after all, no shortage of milk. Those cows are out there giving their all and it's plenty. They are already overworked--and now this! The primary reason for introducing this new production technique is that Monsanto is looking for big new profits. The senior vice president of Monsanto (letter, April 4) forgot to mention that little detail but it is inescapable.
SCIENCE
February 28, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Listen up loners: A new study says having friends can make you smarter, at least if you're a baby cow.  Researchers from the University of British Columbia found that young calves that live alone performed worse on tests of cognitive skill than calves that live with a buddy. On most dairy farms, calves are removed from their mothers soon after they are born and put in a pen or a hutch where they live alone for eight to 10 weeks while they wean. The practice developed to keep disease from spreading among susceptible baby cows.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An Idaho dairy responded Wednesday to an animal rights group's latest video showing the abuse of cows, saying the renewed attention is likely to spur more threats to its staff. "We are the ones who will pay for what happens to our animals," family-owned Bettencourt Dairies said in a statement. "Yet the things in this world that take place every day, who will stop that, the bullying of our child when he steps foot in the public school, he had nothing to do with this. " Mercy for Animals on Tuesday released a clip from 2012 of a worker, who was eventually sentenced to jail, sexually abusing a cow. The video is being used to help fight legislation in Idaho that would punish people who go undercover to film at farms.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Striking back at a proposed Idaho law that would ban undercover filming at farms, an animal rights group released video Tuesday of a dairy worker sexually abusing a cow. The graphic scene, recorded in 2012, was not initially released when Los Angeles-based Mercy for Animals pushed authorities to investigate animal abuse at Bettencourt Dairies in Idaho. The original video showed about two minutes of lashings, beatings and stompings suffered by cows. The dairy quickly fired five people after that video was released and installed surveillance cameras throughout its facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
STEVINSON, Calif. -  A leggy bridesmaid smoothed her Grecian-pleated dress and stuffed lipstick and two cigars into her cowboy boots.  Over by the horses, the best man slipped a flask out of his vest and offered a mare a sip. The preacher was late, but everything else was on schedule for the sunset wedding at the Double T. The cows had been herded from the pasture to make room for cars, and the barn was hung with white lights and Mason jars....
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Farms are having a moment. Which, if you've gone to any weddings recently, is not news to you. For many a bride, her big day takes place in a rustic barn with a “farmhouse chic” decor that includes mint juleps served in mason jars. The ambitious bride even sticks her bridesmaids in cowboy boots. “I never thought I'd see the day when … people would want country instead of country club for their wedding,” says Tony Azevedo, who turned his Central Valley farm into a wedding destination . Turns out, the trend-seeking urbanites are providing enough supplemental income to rescue dairy farmers from financial collapse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Evan Halper
California is spending nearly $15 million to build 10 hydrogen fueling stations, even though just 227 hydrogen-powered vehicles exist in the state today. It's a hefty bet on the future, given that government officials have been trying for nine years, with little success, to get automakers to build more hydrogen cars . The project is part of a sprawling but little-known state program that packs a powerful financial punch: It spent $1.6 billion last year on a myriad of energy-efficiency and alternative-energy projects.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
The worst drought in modern history has destroyed more than half the nation's corn crop, pushing prices to record levels. Livestock producers across the country are feeling the pinch as they struggle to feed their herds. To cope, one Kentucky cattle farmer has begun feeding candy to his 1,400 cows. "It's so hard to make any money when corn is eight or nine dollars a bushel," said Nick Smith, co-owner of United Livestock Commodities in Mayfield, Ky. The candy, which has been rejected from retail sale, makes up from 5% to 8% of the  cattle's feed ration, Smith said.
SCIENCE
February 28, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Listen up loners: A new study says having friends can make you smarter, at least if you're a baby cow.  Researchers from the University of British Columbia found that young calves that live alone performed worse on tests of cognitive skill than calves that live with a buddy. On most dairy farms, calves are removed from their mothers soon after they are born and put in a pen or a hutch where they live alone for eight to 10 weeks while they wean. The practice developed to keep disease from spreading among susceptible baby cows.
OPINION
October 13, 2013 | By Hal Herzog
We Americans like to think of ourselves as animal lovers. But is this claim true? One way to answer this question is to follow the money. According to government, industry and interest group stats, we spend about $50 billion on our pets annually and donate another $6 billion to animal-related and environmental charities. This sounds like a lot until you compare it to the amount we collectively devote to killing members of other species: $72 billion on hunting and fishing, $60 billion on animal research and $240 billion on meat, poultry and seafood.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Does your dairy herd get skittish every time you hit the milking parlor drenched in Drakkar Noir? Does a splash of Hugo by Hugo Boss have your flock of sheep heading for the hills? If so, the answer to your fragrance faux pas may well be Portland General Store's new Farmer's Cologne. When I first caught wind of the cologne -- made by the same Maine-based company that makes manly grooming products like tobacco-scented beard oil, whiskey-scented aftershave and a soap called "Hunting Camp" -- I was intrigued by the notion that the potion was formulated to be "aromatherapeutic and pleasing to cows and livestock.
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