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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Should all secondary school students learn CPR? That's what an American Heart Assn. advisory argued Monday. Included in the ideal curriculum : how to recognize an emergency, how to deliver chest compressions, how to use automated external defibrillators -- and plenty of (simulated) opportunity to practice the skills. It’s unclear how many schools are listening, though. Although 36 states have laws “encouraging” such training, the advisory says, it appears CPR has yet to be embraced as part of the standard collective lesson plan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
The Los Angeles police commission approved 8,000 first-aid trauma kits for officers that could be used to treat their own or others' gunshot wounds in active-shooter situations. “Somewhere, someday a police officer is going to be saved” by one of these kits, said Cmdr. Rick Webb. “This is a big deal.” The trauma kits are modeled after military-style kits used in combat and are smaller than bulky ones officers currently keep in their cars, Webb said. The City Council will have to sign off on the kits before they can be distributed to police.
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SCIENCE
July 28, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Chest compressions alone are as effective in rescuing victims of heart attacks as conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation that combines compressions with forced breathing, researchers said Wednesday. Studies in Washington and Sweden confirm the growing idea that the breathing component of CPR is necessary only for children and those who have suffered drowning or who have respiratory problems. Recent guidelines based on these and earlier studies may overcome some of the fears of bystanders who are reluctant to initiate CPR because of the danger of infectious diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A 2-year-old girl died on Christmas Day after drowning in a pool in the backyard of a Glendora home, police said. Police were called Wednesday at about 4:45 p.m. about the drowning at a home in the 700 block of North Sunny Grove Lane. The first officer arrived about 90 seconds later, authorities said. "When the officer arrived, family members were performing CPR on a 2-year-old child they had just pulled out of a pool in the rear yard," according to a news release from the Glendora Police Department.
OPINION
March 15, 2013
Re "When CPR isn't the right medicine," Opinion, March 13 I agree with Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger about the need for a patient to discuss whether life-saving procedures should be performed if his or her heart stops. These discussions need to be followed quickly by signing the necessary legal statements. As a registered nurse, I have seen the results when no guidance is available. I have also seen unwanted CPR performed when the information in a "do not resuscitate" form wasn't passed on properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1985
Sudden cardiac death claims 1,200 lives per day in the United States, an average of nearly one death per minute. The majority of these deaths occur outside the hospital, the result of irreversible damage to the heart and brain that develops within minutes. Even with the best emergency medical service system, ambulance personnel usually require at least three to four minutes to arrive at the scene. A critical factor in determining survival is the amount of time that elapses prior to the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Ruben Vives, Angel Jennings and Richard Winton
Desirae Macias and her sister were seated in the back of a car this week when gunfire erupted from a passing vehicle. The 7-year-old attempted to shield herself from the bullets. But one of them struck her in the back of the head. Next to her, her 8-year-old sister was covered in her blood, alive, but traumatized. Desirae's mother, who is studying to be a medical assistant, desperately performed CPR. Desirae is now on life support at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and is not expected to survive.
OPINION
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger
The 911 call last month that led to an emergency dispatcher begging workers at a Bakersfield senior living facility to perform CPR on a woman captured the attention of the public. A staff worker told the dispatcher it was against the facility's policy to intervene. The woman, Lorraine Bayless, died. It is difficult to understand how liability concerns could dissuade anyone from helping a person in distress. However, this stark event should awaken us to another question: Should we be performing CPR on 87-year-olds in a community setting such as a senior home?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh, Los Angeles Times
Several Los Angeles officials on Friday said they would probe the findings of an internal Los Angeles Fire Department report detailing delays in getting 911 callers to begin CPR on cardiac arrest victims. The study, disclosed by The Times this week, found LAFD dispatchers waste valuable time getting callers to start CPR, often beginning the life-saving procedure after the point at which brain death can begin. The study raised particular concerns about a time-consuming script of questions call-takers are required to ask before giving CPR instructions or dispatching rescue units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
Bakersfield police are investigating a senior living facility over its handling of an 87-year-old woman who died after a staff member declined to perform CPR last week. A woman who identified herself as a nurse at Glenwood Gardens refused to give the woman CPR as directed by a Bakersfield fire dispatcher, saying that it was against the facility's policy for staff to do so, according to a 911 tape released by the Bakersfield Fire Department. Police are trying to "determine whether or not there is any criminal wrongdoing in the matter," such as negligence or abuse, said Michaela Beard, a spokeswoman for the Bakersfield Police Department.
SPORTS
November 20, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
There is a leftover tidbit to this year's World Series Game 3, when umpire Jim Joyce called obstruction at third base to end the game and send the Boston Red Sox to defeat. When Joyce's father died in 2009, among the things buried with him was a Red Sox cap. "He was flipping over in his grave when I made that call," Joyce says. There are umpires and there is Jim Joyce. He doesn't want to be special, other than to have people know he does a good job. But a triangle of fate and circumstance has singled him out. Oct. 26, 2013, St. Louis, World Series Game 3 The Cardinals and Red Sox were tied in the ninth inning, 4-4, when Boston catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia rose from tagging out Yadier Molina at the plate to see Allen Craig running toward third base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Ruben Vives, Angel Jennings and Richard Winton
Desirae Macias and her sister were seated in the back of a car this week when gunfire erupted from a passing vehicle. The 7-year-old attempted to shield herself from the bullets. But one of them struck her in the back of the head. Next to her, her 8-year-old sister was covered in her blood, alive, but traumatized. Desirae's mother, who is studying to be a medical assistant, desperately performed CPR. Desirae is now on life support at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and is not expected to survive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Deputies gave CPR to an 8-year-old boy who was found unconscious in a washing machine filled with water in his Castaic home, authorities said Thursday afternoon. The boy was pulled from the machine by his father Wednesday evening. The father had been working in the yard in the home in the 30500 block of Pansy Court and the mother was at a store, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. The father realized that his son was not responsive and dialed 911. Deputies arrived and began CPR until Fire Department personnel showed up.  Department officials said the child was taken to a nearby hospital and was listed Thursday afternoon in stable condition.  Deputies were investigating how the child ended up in the washing machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Michael Jackson's son Prince was in the sitting room of the family's rented Holmby Hills mansion when he heard screaming. He ran to the kitchen and saw Dr. Conrad Murray dash upstairs. Prince, 16, said he followed, and when he looked in the bedroom, he saw his father lying half off the bed, his eyes rolled back in his head and the man he called "Dr. Conrad" giving the pop singer cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After the entertainer was rushed by ambulance to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Prince said he and his two siblings saw Murray again.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Jurors got their first taste of the forensic details of how Trayvon Martin died at the hands of George Zimmerman, as the prosecution in the controversial Florida murder case began to present the nuts and bolts of the argument that it hopes will sway the jury. On Monday, the prosecution presented its first witnesses and concentrated on emergency telephone calls made by Zimmerman, charged with second-degree murder in the shooting of Martin. On Tuesday, the mood shifted as the prosecution emphasized the physical details of the night of Feb. 26, 2012.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By David Zahniser
An Indiana man died this week after a fall in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, officials with the National Park Service said Friday. David Breuer, 47, had been visiting Kings Canyon National Park with his family. He left a trail Thursday to approach the top of Mist Falls, four trail miles from Road's End in Kings Canyon, and slipped and fell into the cascade, according to park officials. Other park visitors attempted to administer CPR, but Breuer could not be revived.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
On “Grey's Anatomy,” doctors steer family members out of the hospital room when they call a code blue and start performing CPR on a patient because it's just too upsetting to watch. But in real life, doctors should be inviting family members to observe their attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation, researchers say. A study published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that family members who looked on as doctors performed CPR on their loved ones were far less likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder three months later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Robert J. Lopez, Ben Welsh and Kate Linthicum
Los Angeles Fire Department dispatchers waste valuable time getting 911 callers to start CPR on cardiac arrest victims, often beginning the life-saving procedure after the point at which brain death begins, according to an internal study obtained by The Times . The study raised particular concerns about time-consuming scripted questions dispatchers are required to ask, including one that forces frantic and confused callers to make difficult judgments...
OPINION
March 15, 2013
Re "When CPR isn't the right medicine," Opinion, March 13 I agree with Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger about the need for a patient to discuss whether life-saving procedures should be performed if his or her heart stops. These discussions need to be followed quickly by signing the necessary legal statements. As a registered nurse, I have seen the results when no guidance is available. I have also seen unwanted CPR performed when the information in a "do not resuscitate" form wasn't passed on properly.
OPINION
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin M. Dirksen and Neil S. Wenger
The 911 call last month that led to an emergency dispatcher begging workers at a Bakersfield senior living facility to perform CPR on a woman captured the attention of the public. A staff worker told the dispatcher it was against the facility's policy to intervene. The woman, Lorraine Bayless, died. It is difficult to understand how liability concerns could dissuade anyone from helping a person in distress. However, this stark event should awaken us to another question: Should we be performing CPR on 87-year-olds in a community setting such as a senior home?
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