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SPORTS
August 22, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Jim Joyce is a 24-year veteran of Major League Baseball who is probably best known as the umpire who robbed Detroit's Armando Galarraga of a perfect game in 2010. Until now. Now his claim to fame will be something much more important -- saving the life of another human being. Joyce was walking through the tunnel at Chase Field on Monday with the other three members of the umpiring crew about 90 minutes before the Arizona Diamondbacks-Miami Marlins game when he saw a woman having a seizure.
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TRAVEL
September 16, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: On a recent flight from Los Angeles to Shanghai, an older woman passenger collapsed on my lap and then on my feet. The flight crew had to bring an oxygen tank to her. It was terrifying, and I didn't know what to do. If this ever happens again, what should I do? Kevin Orbach Nantong, China Answer: The quick answer is to summon help, stay calm and do what you can, which sounds simple but isn't. What you are required to do, what you can do and what you should do are different questions, so we'll start with the easiest one first.
NEWS
February 19, 1995
No, that was not a freight train at Santa Monica College. The boxcar-like procession in the middle of Pearl Street was actually a line of temporary classrooms delivered to the college Wednesday and moved onto the campus Thursday for final assembly. The six bungalows will provide more classroom and library space while earthquake repairs and expansion work continue on Santa Monica College buildings.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | Dianne Klein
When it was happening, it really couldn't have been, could it? "Everything will be fine ," Dianne Bordeaux remembers telling herself. Even when she'd called 911, while she was still screaming out the front door for somebody to please help, for somebody who knew CPR, she thought, " Of course , it will be all right." It is not. Jennifer Hope Dawson, 3 years old this past May, is in Dianne's arms now. The accident , as it is known around here, was five months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Lisa Zamosky
Few of us expect to find ourselves riding in the back of an ambulance, yet in 2012 nearly 600,000 people in Los Angeles County were transported to hospital emergency rooms. And that's just in response to 911 calls. But how does it work? Where do they take you? How much does it cost and who pays for it? Every city and county in Southern California has a slightly different way of handling emergencies. But Cathy Chidester, director of the Los Angeles County Emergency Medical Services Agency, says most local areas operate under similar principles.
NEWS
August 9, 1990
The city of Beverly Hills announced that it has extended its contract with Marjelee Murrell, coordinator of the city's cardiopulmonary resuscitation program. Murrell, who became coordinator of the city's extensive CPR program in 1984, has trained and supervised more than 100 volunteers who have taught CPR to more than 30,000 people. The city requires that all graduates of Beverly Hills High School pass a CPR class.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The article by Allan Parachini, "For CPR, It's an Unfamiliar Role--Under Fire," in the June 13 edition, was of particular interest to paramedics in the City of Los Angeles. We have had hundreds of cases in which bystander CPR contributed significantly to the patient's survival. We have also had thousands of cases where patients did not survive because the lifesaving system did not function in a coordinated manner. Public education in CPR, how to access the emergency care system, and what to do before rescuers arrive are crucial elements in what we have termed the "patient care chain."
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