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NATIONAL
May 30, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
BP's request for tax records poses a problem for some residents of fishing communities in southeastern Louisiana — the nonconformists who haven't kept records or reported their cash income. The first step for a commercial fisherman or coastal business seeking compensation for losses suffered in the oil spill seems simple enough: Submit copies of a commercial fishing license, proof of residence and tax statements. But the request for tax records poses a serious challenge to some residents of close-knit fishing communities on the swampy edges of southeastern Louisiana, which for generations have harbored self-reliant nonconformists who don't pay much heed to everyday rules and regulations.
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NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
It was a bad time to hold a seafood festival, Day 39 of the United States' worst oil spill. But this is a place that worships seafood, and on Saturday, the Plaquemines Parish Seafood Festival went on as scheduled. People danced and ate and tried to divert their minds from the impending ecological disaster at their shores. They came to dig into fried catfish, savor broiled oysters and munch shrimp on a stick. By midday, about 1,000 people had already gathered at a grassy field at the parish's fairgrounds, about 30 minutes outside New Orleans.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2010 | By Alana Semuels and P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
As the Louisiana sun beat down on the Westwego Seafood Market, the aisles were as empty as the coolers. Fish hawkers paced alongside sparsely filled counters dotted with shrimp and crabs, calling out in strained voices to the few customers strolling by. Many of the outdoor stalls were boarded up. There wasn't a single oyster to be had. Just a week ago, the market outside New Orleans was packed with crowds grabbing up shellfish for their...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2008 | associated press
An unusually weak Dungeness crab harvest is compounding the financial woes of West Coast fishermen who were already struggling with depressed consumer demand and the unprecedented collapse of the Pacific chinook salmon fishery. Commercial fishermen in California, Oregon and Washington are struggling to stay afloat financially. They say the downturn could force fishermen who depend heavily on crab and salmon to leave the shrinking ranks of the region's fishing fleet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
When Dada Ngo opened a Cajun-style crayfish restaurant in the heart of Orange County's Vietnamese enclave, she worried whether it would survive. Crayfish was popular fare along the Gulf Coast where she had lived, but the red-clawed crustaceans were alien to most West Coast Vietnamese diners. Some thought crayfish were fish. They were intimidated when what looked like tiny lobsters were brought from the kitchen in steaming plastic bags and dumped on the table.
FOOD
September 10, 2008 | Noelle Carter, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: I hope you can obtain the recipe for the great crab cakes I had at Traxx in Union Station. Hope they're not too difficult to make. Ruth Mayle Northridge Dear Ruth: These light, crisp crab cakes are big on flavor and size. Large chunks of crabmeat are gently folded into a colorful mix of diced red onion, parsley, cilantro and minced sourdough with more than a hint of spice thrown in for added kick. -- Traxx crab cakes Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 5 Note: Adapted from Traxx restaurant in L.A. The restaurant serves these with a chipotle mayonnaise.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The governors of Virginia and Maryland announced in Colonial Beach that they would order the female blue crab harvest cut by a third this year to protect the hallmark seafood of the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists fear that the crab population is reaching numbers too low to survive. "We do not want to wake up in five or 10 years and realize we have lost this important part of who we are," said Virginia Gov. Timothy Kaine.
FOOD
February 27, 2008
Total time: 1 hour Servings: 4 1 3/4 pounds English peas in their shells 1 onion, chopped 1 3/4 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 tablespoon butter 1 leek, chopped 1/4 cup rice 3 ounces Dungeness crab meat (a little more than 1/2 cup), preferably leg and claw meat 1 tablespoon slivered mint 1 to 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1. Shell the peas , collecting them in a bowl (you should have about 2 cups) and putting the pods in a large saucepan. Rinse the pods under running water, and then add the onion and 8 cups of water, the salt and the sugar.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Chesapeake Bay's famous blue crabs -- feisty crustaceans that are both a regional symbol and a multimillion-dollar catch -- are hovering at historically low population levels, scientists say, as pollution, climate change and overfishing threaten the bay's ultimate survivor. This fall, a committee of federal and state scientists found that the crab population was at its second-lowest level in the last 17 years, having fallen to about one-third the population of 1993.
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