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NEWS
January 14, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For millions of years, one of nature's rituals has repeated itself with mysterious, majestic clockwork. Now, it seems, the clock has stopped. That's what Dr. Asad Rahmani, professor at the Aligarh Muslim University, concluded to his dismay when, a few days ago, he came to these marshlands 40 miles west of the Taj Mahal with both foreboding and hope in his heart.
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NEWS
January 14, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For millions of years, one of nature's rituals has repeated itself with mysterious, majestic clockwork. Now, it seems, the clock has stopped. That's what Dr. Asad Rahmani, professor at the Aligarh Muslim University, concluded to his dismay when, a few days ago, he came to these marshlands 40 miles west of the Taj Mahal with both foreboding and hope in his heart.
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SPORTS
May 5, 2002 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Four weeks from today, defending champion France and first-time World Cup participant Senegal will step onto the field at the largest soccer-only stadium in Asia and 64,677 fans at the Sangam World Cup Stadium in Seoul, South Korea, will ask: "Where are all the gnomes?" If that seems absurd, it is, but it's no more bizarre than a whole host of peculiar happenings occurring in the run-up to Korea/Japan '02, the first World Cup to be held in Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
As the Cole Porter classic goes, "Birds do it, bees do it. Even educated fleas do it." And, if they do it at the Los Angeles Zoo, general curator Michael Dee knows how. A zoo biologist in his 38th year at the facility in Griffith Park, he occasionally gives a humor-studded talk, "Woo at the L.A. Zoo." He'll deliver his slide show on attraction, courtship, romance and the mating steps that lead to when baby makes three, or four or more, on Sunday, as a prelude to Valentine's Day.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Seventeen years have passed since Robert T. Singer, curator of Japanese art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, spotted an extraordinary pair of 18th century screens in an exhibition at the Kyoto University Museum of Art. Smitten with Maruyama Okyo's exquisitely detailed depiction of 17 life-size cranes on a glowing background of gold leaf, he decided that LACMA had to have the rare and valuable artwork. It took 13 years, amid many other projects, for Singer to find the owner of the privately held screens.
NEWS
January 5, 2003 | Manuel Roig-Franzia, Washington Post
There is no hair club for bears. No nifty, bear-sized hair plugs. Not even a toupee. All this is a darn shame -- the lumbering Florida black bears in this great expanse of pines and palmettos northwest of Orlando could use the help. In utter defiance of their bearish reputation for thick, bristly hairiness, the Ocala bears are going bald.
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