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Crater Lake

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NEWS
August 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Scientists using a one-person submersible craft plan today to make the first of 20 dives looking for hot springs at the bottom of Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. National Park Service officials and researchers said they hope to confirm the existence of thermal vents on the lake bottom and gather data on many other features of the unusual body of water. Scientists began assembling gear for the unprecedented dive Monday.
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SCIENCE
January 29, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The cracks in Mars' surface may be the fossilized remains of a web of water, according to new research released Tuesday. The findings, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, may explain a mysterious network of ridges that vein across the Red Planet's subsurface -- describing a watery underground that may be an ideal spot to search for evidence of past life. Researchers from Brown University used data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to examine more than 4,000 of these strange ridges across two crater-pocked areas, the Nilosyrtis highlands and the Nili fossae area, studying the ridges' orientations and the composition of the rocks.
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NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Scientists didn't find the hot springs they were seeking on the floor of Crater Lake, but a park official said the 17 dives in a one-man submergible this month yielded valuable scientific information. Oregon State University oceanographer Jack Dymond made the final dive in the Deep Rover on Tuesday, said Peter Thompson, chief ranger at Crater Lake National Park. The dives began Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
A lone gray wolf that authorities have been tracking for months in southern Oregon crossed the state line into northern Siskiyou County earlier this week, becoming the first wolf known to be at large in California since 1924. The radio collar on the young male, known to biologists as OR7, indicated the animal crossed into the state around noon Wednesday. Authorities say the animal is in "dispersal" mode, wandering the rugged California-Oregon border to define a home range and searching for other wolves to establish a pack.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
Seeking to avert flooding, workers began draining a volcanic lake in the Philippines today, after thousands of nearby residents were evacuated from their homes. Water began trickling out of Mt. Pinatubo as workers carved out a small channel to drain the rising crater lake. A "gentle" flow of water from the volcano's crater spilled into the Bucao River nearby, apparently posing no immediate threat to villages, said Delfin Garcia of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology.
NEWS
August 8, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
As a high-tech explorer begins rising through 1,500 feet of frigid water in this volcanic lake, total darkness gives way to an eerie gray glow above him. It is the summer sunlight. At 1,200 feet--about as deep as the Empire State Building is tall--the sun's rays still penetrate the dazzlingly clear waters of the nation's deepest lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | JOSEPH E. BROWN, Brown, a free-lance writer based in San Diego, is the former editor of Oceans magazine.
Oregon's deep and incredibly blue Crater Lake is more than 100 miles from the Pacific Ocean. One wouldn't think of this pristine, wooded mountain resource, set aside as a national park in 1902, as a place that would intrigue a seasoned oceanographer like Jack Dymond of Oregon State University. Dymond is far more accustomed to exploring the depths of the sea, as he was doing 8,000 feet down near the Galapagos Islands in 1977.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | United Press International
Calling the view "absolutely beautiful," a scientist took the one-man mini-sub Deep Rover into the clear blue waters of Crater Lake on its first test dive Thursday. Oregon State University researcher Jack Dymond was at the controls as the million-dollar craft dove 200 feet in a shallow area of the lake to study a dacite dome, a type of lava dome the U.S. Geological Survey wanted explored, said Jack Thompson, chief ranger of the national park.
TRAVEL
June 18, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Next to Oregon's most famous hole in the ground stands a landmark that may be the state's most beloved bad idea. The hole is Crater Lake. For thousands of years, its deep blue waters have collected in the eerily round cup of a blown-out volcano. Its altitude--7,000 feet at the rim's edge--means that it is bordered by stands of pine and blanketed in snow for most of the year. It is the epicenter of Oregon's only national park. The bad idea would be the Crater Lake Lodge.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the bookcase behind biologist Jim Milestone's desk at Crater Lake National Park is a reminder that the National Park Service is "gravely concerned" about geothermal development just outside the park. The park service was so concerned that drilling for heat left by a volcano might rob the lake of clarity that it paid more than $600,000 for a series of dives to look for hot springs. It also focused attention on deep lakes, long the neglected stepchildren of oceanography.
TRAVEL
February 11, 2007 | Curt Hopkins, Special to The Times
WHEN I decided to visit Crater Lake in winter, I thought about cross-country skiing and ranger-guided snowshoe walks -- and the 43 feet of snowfall this place averages each year. I had worked two seasons at the national park in southwestern Oregon (and when I say two seasons, I mean two summers) -- once as a supply truck driver, once as a cook.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2005 | AL MARTINEZ
Picture this: There is a light rain falling and the road leading upward to 6,000 feet is steep and winding, but the car is in good shape, the windshield wipers are whopping out a disco beat and the traffic is light. So why am I leery? I don't trust mountains.
NEWS
April 13, 2004 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
The LAKE IN THE CRATER IS ROUND AND BLUE. ABOVE IT, on the lip of this blown-out old volcano, the old lodge stands shuttered and snowbound, closed since October. Inside, beyond the empty armchairs and darkened halls, the keeper of Crater Lake Lodge sits in a basement office facing his keyboard. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, you're thinking.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The birth of Crater Lake National Park 100 years ago was a long and difficult one, mostly because Congress in the 19th century thought its remote location made it a loser with tourists. But a Kansas schoolboy's fascination with the idea of a lake inside a volcano became an adult obsession, until the stars finally aligned and, on May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the proclamation creating the nation's fifth national park.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
Seeking to avert flooding, workers began draining a volcanic lake in the Philippines today, after thousands of nearby residents were evacuated from their homes. Water began trickling out of Mt. Pinatubo as workers carved out a small channel to drain the rising crater lake. A "gentle" flow of water from the volcano's crater spilled into the Bucao River nearby, apparently posing no immediate threat to villages, said Delfin Garcia of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
A dozen tribesmen with picks and shovels climbed the Mt. Pinatubo volcano Thursday on a dangerous mission to drain a crater lake that threatens their villages with massive floods. Tugging a leashed pig to sacrifice to their mountain god, the Aeta tribesmen planned to carve a notch in the volcano's crater to slowly release water from the rising lake. Accompanied by a dozen porters and two engineers, the diggers are expected to chop 16 feet off the lowest point of Pinatubo's summit.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The birth of Crater Lake National Park 100 years ago was a long and difficult one, mostly because Congress in the 19th century thought its remote location made it a loser with tourists. But a Kansas schoolboy's fascination with the idea of a lake inside a volcano became an adult obsession, until the stars finally aligned and, on May 22, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the proclamation creating the nation's fifth national park.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Using the same deep-sea technology that treasure hunters use to find Spanish galleons, scientists plan to map Crater Lake in hopes of unlocking the secrets of the volcano that formed it. On Monday, a boat equipped with echo-sounding equipment will start sending its pings into the cobalt-blue waters of the nation's deepest and clearest lake, which formed from the caldera left after 12,000-foot Mt. Mazama erupted 7,700 years ago.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Geologists plan to hack a notch into the crater of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines in a dangerous operation to drain a volcanic lake that threatens nearby villages with mass floods, scientists said. Workers with picks and shovels are expected to climb the 4,740-foot volcano next week to chop 16 feet off the lowest point of Pinatubo's summit and bleed the crater lake, said Mylene Villegas, head geologist of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | TIM SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It began quietly, with a white mist that bubbled out of this crater lake deep in Cameroon's mountainous interior. The mist formed into a cloud, dropped over a cliff and poured down lush valleys, speeding silently through sleeping villages. Minutes later, the placid lake erupted, spewing out an enormous burst of water that created a 200-foot wave--and a concentrated fog of carbon dioxide vented from deep inside the Earth.
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