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BUSINESS
April 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Shares of America's only remaining supercomputer maker, Cray Research Inc., tumbled in heavy trading Tuesday after the company reported sharply lower earnings and forecast another quarter of weak results. Cray stock skidded $6.125 to close at $49 on volume of over 1 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange. Cray's first-quarter earnings dropped to $1.5 million, or 5 cents a share, from $26.4 million, 85 cents a share, a year ago. Revenue fell to $116.1 million from $145.
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BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | From Reuters
Computer maker Silicon Graphics Inc. is in talks to sell Cray Research--once one of the nation's technological gems--to a little-known technology acquisition firm called Gores Technology Group, industry sources said. One source said that the companies have been talking for at least two months and that Gores, with operations in Los Angeles and Boulder, Colo., originally offered $100 million for the struggling supercomputer maker.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 1990 | From Times wire services
Supercomputer-maker Cray Research Inc., which has seen several key leadership changes in recent years, said today that Marcelo Gumucio submitted his resignation as president, chief operating officer and a member of its board. Cray Chief Executive Officer John Rollwagen cited differences of management style for the surprise departure of Gumucio, who became president in November, 1988.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cray Research, the only U.S. supercomputer maker, emerged victorious Friday when the U.S. International Trade Commission upheld a dumping complaint and triggered the imposition of tariffs as high as 454% on Japanese supercomputers, effectively pricing them out of the market. The financial impact of the decision will be limited, as just a handful of Japanese supercomputers are in operation in this country.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1999 | From Reuters
Computer maker Silicon Graphics Inc. is in talks to sell Cray Research--once one of the nation's technological gems--to a little-known technology acquisition firm called Gores Technology Group, industry sources said. One source said that the companies have been talking for at least two months and that Gores, with operations in Los Angeles and Boulder, Colo., originally offered $100 million for the struggling supercomputer maker.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
In a combination of the biggest and possibly the brightest in the computer industry, IBM said Tuesday that it intends to join forces with supercomputer superstar Steve Chen to develop advanced computing systems. Details of the pending partnership, which is expected to be created early next year, were not revealed. Under terms of the preliminary agreement, however, IBM said it would provide unspecified initial funding to Chen's company, Supercomputer Systems, of Eau Claire, Wis.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, Silicon Graphics Inc., the maker of powerful graphics computers used to render the special effects in motion pictures such as "Forrest Gump" and "Jurassic Park" as well as 3-D workstations for scientists and engineers, will announce its intention to acquire troubled supercomputer pioneer Cray Research at a news conference to be held today in New York, sources said. Cray executives are expected to support the acquisition.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Powerful Computer Unveiled: Cray Research Inc. unveiled a supercomputer four times more powerful than the fastest model the company has on the market. The C90 is geared toward customers with a need for speed. It has 16 central processing units and a peak speed of 16 gigaflops--16 billion calculations per second. The company has six or seven signed orders for the $30-million machine, said Charles Grassl, a Cray Research senior marketing analyst.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the top U.S. supercomputer maker, miffed at losing a major contract to a Japanese competitor, accused Japan on Friday of violating a trade agreement on fair bidding. John A. Rollwagen, head of Minnesota-based Cray Research Inc., said a special government appeals board was being protectionist in upholding a public institute's decision to buy a supercomputer from NEC Corp.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Boulder, Colo.-based National Center for Atmospheric Research has acquired an additional Cray supercomputer after Minnesota-based Cray Research, the last U.S. supercomputer manufacturer, blocked the federal agency's plans to purchase a Japanese-made NEC supercomputer.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Silicon Graphics said Wednesday that it lost $49 million in its fiscal fourth quarter after taking a charge of $102 million for its acquisition of supercomputer company Cray Research. But the Mountain View, Calif.-based computer systems maker on its own enjoyed record profit, exceeding analysts' expectations. The company also announced that its president, Thomas Jermoluk, has resigned effective immediately to head At Home Corp.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1996 | From Associated Press
Cray Research Inc. stepped up its battle to keep a lock on the U.S. supercomputer market by filing a complaint of dumping Monday against a Japanese competitor. Eagan, Minn.-based Cray accused NEC Corp. of winning a contract with a federal climate laboratory last spring by offering four supercomputers for the price of one. NEC denies the allegation. "This is very serious to us. This is a very big deal to us," said Robert Ewald, Cray's president and chief operating officer.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The era of the supercomputer is fading. Silicon Graphics Inc., the Mountain View, Calif., manufacturer of 3-D workstations, announced Monday that it will acquire Cray Research Inc., the last of the supercomputer companies. Cray, the inventor of the computer engineering marvels, will lose its independence. Silicon Graphics agreed to purchase Cray for $752 million, a relatively modest premium over its market value of $644.4 million.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, Silicon Graphics Inc., the maker of powerful graphics computers used to render the special effects in motion pictures such as "Forrest Gump" and "Jurassic Park" as well as 3-D workstations for scientists and engineers, will announce its intention to acquire troubled supercomputer pioneer Cray Research at a news conference to be held today in New York, sources said. Cray executives are expected to support the acquisition.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1995 | WILLIAM MCCALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The thing that makes a supercomputer super today is the same thing that drives a home computer. But more of it. Supercomputers were once room-size machines and the stuff of technology legends, helping the government forecast weather or scientists analyze earthquakes, create new drugs and understand nuclear physics. They're still the most powerful and expensive computers being made but now they look like big refrigerators.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1992 | From Reuters
Cray Research Inc., the world's largest supercomputer maker, said Wednesday that it will use a computer chip from Digital Equipment Corp. to power the new-generation machines it plans to roll out next year. Chairman John Rollwagen said Cray will use Digital's Alpha chip in a radically new line of supercomputers called massively parallel processors. Rollwagen called Digital's chip the fastest in the world. Cray Research shares jumped $2.125 to $46.50 in New York Stock Exchange trading.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a long way from heading supercomputer giant Cray Research. But for John Rollwagen, working for Chatsworth-based Plasma & Materials Technologies Inc.--a small technology company often confused with a blood bank--is like deja vu . "I absolutely fell in love with it," says Rollwagen, who was named PMT's chairman last month. "It reminded me so much of Cray in the middle '70s I could hardly stand it."
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