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Cray Research Inc

BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | From Associated Press
Convex Computer Corp. on Tuesday started a supercomputer slugfest, unveiling three computer families, with one that directly challenges industry leader Cray Research Inc. The 20 products in the company's C-3, for third generation, series make supercomputers more accessible by lowering their cost, Convex officials said. "We want to add value to the customers," said Convex President and Chief Executive Robert J. Paluck.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who makes the fastest supercomputers in the world? Increasingly, the answer seems to be Japan. That bothers American scientists, who worry that Japan's supercomputer advantage will translate into greater Japanese competitiveness in a broad range of industries, including pharmaceuticals and semiconductors, where the machines help design new products, and automobiles, where they simulate crash tests. The U.S. government has responded to the threat with a heavy hand.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1990
Marcelo Gumucio, president and chief operating officer of Cray Research Inc., has resigned from both positions at the supercomputer maker. Cray Chairman and Chief Executive John A. Rollwagen said for the "foreseeable future" he will assume Gumucio's responsibilities in addition to his current duties. Rollwagen said in a letter to employees that he and Gumucio "were unable to agree" on how the Minneapolis company should be run.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1990 | From Times wire services
Supercomputer-maker Cray Research Inc., which has seen several key leadership changes in recent years, said today that Marcelo Gumucio submitted his resignation as president, chief operating officer and a member of its board. Cray Chief Executive Officer John Rollwagen cited differences of management style for the surprise departure of Gumucio, who became president in November, 1988.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1990 | DATAQUEST, DATAQUEST is a market-intelligence firm based in San Jose
A supercomputer capable of performing billions of calculations per second may cost as much as $25 million. Therefore the sale of as few as 15 supercomputers can make the difference between a strong and weak performance for the entire industry. Two factors may cause another shakeout among manufacturers. First, government institutions are cutting back. They have consistently purchased the largest systems, contributing, for example, 50% of the revenue of Cray Research Inc., the industry leader.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking its first move into lower-priced, lowered-powered models, supercomputer pioneer Cray Research said Thursday that it has tentatively agreed to acquire a Silicon Valley maker of so-called mini-supercomputers. Terms of the all-cash purchase of Supertek Computer of Santa Clara, Calif., were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Persistent sluggish computer sales have prompted three more high-technology companies to trim their work forces. Cray Research Inc., a Minneapolis supercomputer maker, said Monday that it was laying off about 400 employees in its Wisconsin manufacturing operations because of slowing demand for its state-of-the art scientific machines. The layoffs represent about 7% of the company's worldwide work force of about 5,400. Motorola Inc., of Schaumburg, Ill.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1989 | Associated Press
Cray Research Inc. of the United States, the world's largest supercomputer maker, and Hitachi have agreed to share technology in Cray's first deal with a Japanese computer maker, according to media reports. The nationally circulated Asahi Shimbun newspaper, Japan Broadcasting Corp. and Kyodo News Service, all quoting unidentified "industry sources," said the two have agreed to exchange supercomputer hardware technology, including circuits for high-speed analysis of scientific information.
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